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old dog

through hole

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I use a 1/8th bit and a drill press.

 

1. Mark where you want your nose and tail holes with an awl or punch. Make a small dent. If you are center drilling then just use the dents made from mounting the stock in the lathe.

 

2. Put a nail through a piece of wood. Nice and straight. (use your drill press to make a pilot hole) I use a nail that that has a diameter the same as the drill bit you will use to make the through hole. This will make it more accurate when you are repeating step 6 later. I use 1/8" for through holes.

 

3. Put nail/wood on drill press table (nail point pointing up) and place your lure on the nail (either end of the lure) and adjust the table height so you can fit your work just under your drill bit installed in the chuck.

 

4. Remove lure. Put a 1/4" metal rod in the chuck. It needs to be long enough when mounted in the chuck and you extend the quill the rod touches the tip of the nail. I have several of different lengths. You can probably use threaded rod if you can not find plain metal rods. Extend the rod down to the nail. Center the nail to the end of the metal rod and clamp the nail/wood in place. I have drilled a small dent in the center of the end of the rods to make centering the nail easier.

 

5. Remove the rod and put your drill bit in.

 

6. Place lure on the nail on the nose or tail mark made in step 1.

 

7. Drill slowly and back the bit out after every advance of 1/4" to 1/2" to clear sawdust. This will keep the bit tracking true. The harder the wood the less the advance between sawdust clearings.

 

8. When you drilled as far as you can from one side, flip the lure and repeat steps 6 & 7. I have some washers I put on the nail so when after I flip and put the other side on the nail it does not slide down the nail. You want the wood to come down just past the point of the nail. This will center the 1/8" hole on the 1/8" nail and be more accurate.

 

9. Connect the two holes using a long bit (12" telephone installers or airplane bit) in a hand held drill. Before I start this step I take a small disk of plastic (cut from a coffee can lid) with a small slit cut in it and slide it onto the drill to mark on the bit how far I have to go (plus 1/2") to be in the middle of the lure. I like to start with the tail side, then do the nose side. FOLLOW THE ADVICE IN STEP 7 plus use light pressure and let the drill do the work. Run the drill at full speed. Also turn the lure about a quarter turn after each sawdust clearing. This will compensate for any body english or flex in the drill bit.

 

10. Ream it out several times once you have made it through.

 

11. If using a tail weight enlarge the tail hole using several increasingly larger bits. I will place the nose hole on the nail to keep things centered. Use the depth stop or a plastic disk to control the depth.

 

12. If using a nose grommet enlarge the nose hole to the appropriate diameter deep enough for the grommet. I do this with a hand drill and the disk of plastic to mark the depth.

 

13. For drilling any belly holes I put the blank in a v-block and line the blank up by eye. I will put a fence on the press table to butt the v-block against so I can repeat for multiple blanks. Drill the first one. If it is off a little - nudge the fence. If the v in your block is centered and the side of the block against the fence is parallel to the center of the v you can drill centered holes anywhere along the bottom of the plug.

 

If your through holes did not meet up all is not lost. I have been able (about half the time) to walk the drill to make the holes meet. Hold the plug where you would think if I made the hole go a little to the left it would meet up. Take the long bit and start re-drilling down the hole but move the drill to the right so you get slight flex in the bit. This will force the point of the drill to track left. It is a zen thing and works some of the time.

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View Postheadscratch.gif Is There any way to get a 5/64 hole to go through a plug IN A STRAIGHT LINE? frown.gif My holes are off by at least 1/4 of an inch. Any help will be welcome. smile.gif

 

 

How long are the plugs you're drilling and are you drilling from one or both ends?

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Your drill, 5/64 (.078) is pretty small. In most cases when drilling small holes you should increase spindle speed....BUT....if it's a long drill you may "whip it" which means bend it from centrifugal force.

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View PostYour drill, 5/64 (.078) is pretty small. In most cases when drilling small holes you should increase spindle speed....BUT....if it's a long drill you may "whip it" which means bend it from centrifugal force.

 

 

Listen to him , he has variable speed , and knows how to use it.smile.gifcwm15.gif

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have not messed up a through hole on the lathe yet. i do use a really small 5/32 to start the hole and then attach my long shaft bit so that when it enters the existing hole (about three inches deep into the plug) it tends to wander less since there is less wiggle room. i used to use the drill press a lot and its just important to drill a small area and lift the bit out so you clean the hole of dust/chips and repeat.

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I don't bother drilling starter holes on both sides. If you mark the center of one end of the blank, use a drill press and take your time clearing as you go you may not come out exactly centered on the other side but if you are close, once you turn the blank on the lathe it doesnt matter. You'd never know if it was centered through or not. If you miss by too much though you'll end up with a flat spot along the length of your turned blank.

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If you are drilling on a drill press, can you drill the hole before you put it on the lathe? If you can, here are some pictures of tools you can easily build to hold your plug blank. The two on the bottom of the first pic were either custom made or bought at a store that caters to pen turners, like woodcraft.

 

If drilling on a DP, have you checked to see if the table is perpendicular to the drill bit?

 

Hope this helps some

Rob

 

 

200661712738_jig1.JPG

 

200661712814_jig3.JPG

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