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oldschool77

Help needed to properly adjust drag using scale and choosing correct swivel rating

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Hey folks. Twice recently I had some snap offs and I believe my drag was not properly adjusted. Plus I am still dealing with a slight learning curve after converting to braid last season. I don't make nearly the same mistakes but I am always learning limitations of my drag settings. I definitely don't crank it on and I don't let it slip on a strong cast. I have heard a safe starting point is roughly 25% of the lines rating and others use "feel" over anything else.

 

How much does drag "A" vs drag "B" on a different reel play into the setting using the same line meaning one manufacturers (Shimano) over say another (Okuma?)

 

Is the rod sensitivity/rating something of importance? (lower drag for faster action rods?)

 

How do you treat low memory braid to mono when setting drag? I assume braid would require LESS drag due to the sheer resilience vs the more forgiving/elastic mono.

 

As a side question how do you choose your swivel test based on the line rating? If I use 75 test swivels (size 4 spro) to slightly help casting is that fine with 30lb PP?

 

Sure the size of the fish you plan to land is the ultimate deciding factor but with Power Pro braid (mostly using 20-30lb) I realize setting the hook is touchy and I have yanked many a plug out of a fishes mouth hastily yanking on the rod before patiently waiting for a proper hook set.

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I usually set my drags between 25 - 30% of line test rating.

Standard rule for snap swivels is 3x line strength.

Reel manufacturer shouldn't make a difference, but I would check how smooth the drags are. If they're jerky, then you need to fix the drag.

I don't know what difference rod action would have on drag settings either.

You don't mention mono or fluorocarbon top shot. Braid doesn't stretch, a sudden jerk on the line can break it. If you're not, then try using a top shot to provide some cushion against sudden shock.

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I assume by topshot you mean a shock leader. I do use a 50lb flouro but because it is about 24-36 inches I didn't think the amount of "give" was noticeable.

 

Thanks on the snap swivels...I am only 2x's the amount not 3 x's.

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Simple: Set the drag to what you think you'll need and when you catch a fish you'll know whether or not you'll need to back it off or tighten it. Don't make it more complicated than it really is. wink.gif

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View PostSimple: Set the drag to what you think you'll need and when you catch a fish you'll know whether or not you'll need to back it off or tighten it. Don't make it more complicated than it really is. wink.gif

 

That is the whole reason why I posted...I can't figure it out! If I had a vague idea I wouldn't be losing fish unnecessarily!! I have been catching fish for a long time but I want to know if my drag has been the reason for lost fish or "operator error" (ME!)

 

 

I make solid hook sets and i am careful on my retrieve but i feel like the fish should run more then I let it. There is nothing complicated about setting it properly once and then after every teardown knowing a "starting point" instead of guessing or using "feel"

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20 to 30lb braid - set your drag at between 8 & 10lb. Use a scale the first few times, pull by hand after you set it on a scale to get a feel. Muscle memory will then take effect and you won't need a scale. The only break offs should be from rubbing the line on structure (rocks etc) or from line that was nicked up already.

 

Swivels - I use Krok #7 on almost all my setups; small enough for me to be comfortable with it and strong enough to feel confident it won't fail.

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I've never used anything more than the pull test. It has worked for me since I began fishing 18 years ago. My suggestion is simplify it. You will lose fish. I happens to everyone, your drag may not be the one to blame. There are way too many variables.

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View PostI've never used anything more than the pull test. It has worked for me since I began fishing 18 years ago. My suggestion is simplify it. You will lose fish. I happens to everyone, your drag may not be the one to blame. There are way too many variables.

 

 

Yeah, really its the guy holding the rod who's to blame. I screwed up a big fish recently. My fault, totally. Partly because I've been using a lever drag bottom fishing for a while, then started using a star drag baitcaster in the surf. I wasn't use to the way the drag works and kept setting it too light, so I tightened it. Hooked fish, BIG FISH thought I was still having the too light problem, buttoned down. Pop. Felt like the inside of the cheek or something broke and I nearly got hit with the rig, if it was mono I would have. Saw it at the surface, it was big, and there were three or four others about the same size that came up with their top two fins out of the water just out a few feet past it, when it came up (never saw that before). Hooked another one and did the same thing, on the next cast because the drag was still on lockdown. Again, my fault.

 

The pull test works, I actually set the drag with a 10lb dumbell. Tie a loop to it. Then rig the rod with a swivel, leader and hook and no sinker. Then hook the hook on the loop and lift the rod to 45 degrees and set the drag based on the weight and how it feels. I do this almost every time I am about to go out just to make sure--I think it helps with making sure the knots are good, too. I DID NOT do this the day I messed up, since its a star drag and I thought it wouldn't matter.

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View Post20 to 30lb braid - set your drag at between 8 & 10lb. Use a scale the first few times, pull by hand after you set it on a scale to get a feel. Muscle memory will then take effect and you won't need a scale. The only break offs should be from rubbing the line on structure (rocks etc) or from line that was nicked up already.

 

Swivels - I use Krok #7 on almost all my setups; small enough for me to be comfortable with it and strong enough to feel confident it won't fail.

 

I agree this that is good advice.

 

I don't even use a scale. I just got used to giving it a pull and that "muscle memory" tells me wear to set the drag and it usually works out to when the fish want to run he could pull the drag if I need to tighten the drag a little i'll do that if the fish is taking more line than he should.

 

You need to to have some give with braid to make up for the lack of stretch in the line.

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View PostYou definately do not need a drag scale for bass.Using braid,tighten your drag until you can pull line with your hand,without getting cut.

 

If you get cut, your drag is to tight.biggrin.gif

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View PostI agree this that is good advice.

 

I don't even use a scale. I just got used to giving it a pull and that "muscle memory" tells me wear to set the drag and it usually works out to when the fish want to run he could pull the drag if I need to tighten the drag a little i'll do that if the fish is taking more line than he should.

 

You need to to have some give with braid to make up for the lack of stretch in the line.

 

I prefer to palm my spool, but that is a personal preference and very much a feel thing.

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