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mitchman

Bass w/eggs

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Was out on the boat in upper BB on May 8 and got into a nice blitz of bass. We took a few home and upon filleting them discovered that several had eggs in them (fish 28" to 34"). A buddy of mine took home a fish from waqouit he caught on May 15th and it had eggs in it as well. So whats the deal? Are these fish staging to spawn in the area? Or are these fish that didn't successfully spawn? Or are these fish that are just maturing & developing first batch of eggs? headscratch.gif

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The past few years, ever bass I've kept from mid May through July had eggs in them. I kept one last week, and she was loaded. A buddy gave me a frame for lobster bait from a fish he kept the other night, and when I chopped it up, she was full as well.

 

So, are these bass not spawning? Or, are there just residual eggs left over from spawning?

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My guess is that females species of most sea life are always carrying roe. I don't think that I have ever caught a female lobster that didn't have roe inside of her. I see the same with mackerel and other bait fish.

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Good point JTR, but I guess the question is how long does it take the female to regenerate eggs after spawning? I can't imagine that they can do it in a time period between spawning in the Chesapeake/Hudson in late march/April and now. Spawning is a huge drain on fish and I would think that their bodies would put energy towards recovering first before putting energy into reproducing, but hey, Im not a fisheries biologist!

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I spoke with a few of the bass experts here at work.

 

A few fish always come up with roe, especially this time of year, so it's not unheard of. But if there's a greater number than normal then that's definitely peculiar.

 

One interesting theory I heard was that it's thought that a certain number of males are required to congregate before a female will spawn. If a female doesn't run into this cluster of males, she'll never breed, and will head north still full of roe. The prevalence of mycobacteriosis in the Chesapeake/Hudson could be a contributor to this. The males are the fish most affected, as they stay in the bays/rivers longer than the females. If males are unfit/sick/dead and are not congregating, then the females never receive the trigger to spawn, and they head north still full of eggs.

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View Post....

 

If males are unfit/sick/dead and are not congregating, then the females never receive the trigger to spawn, and they head north still full of eggs.

 

 

Isn't the size limit down there like 15" in the bay itself for most of the year. No wonder why all the males are dead...cwm40.gif

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View PostIsn't the size limit down there like 15" in the bay itself for most of the year. No wonder why all the males are dead...cwm40.gif

 

The MD regs are 2 fish at 18" however only 1 can be over 28" most of the year, however, in the spring trophy season from Mid april to may its 1 fish 28" or bigger. But its an absolute slaughter by the boat guys I can tell ya I used to live down there.....

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I had one about 34 inches that I kept as it was hooked in the gills. It was really fat and I found out that she was loaded with eggs as well. I have never seen so many eggs in a fish before.

 

I was wondering what this meant as well. headscratch.gif

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