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Slow Cooking Seafood

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View PostI'd think it would get dry and tough.

 

 

I agree, most oven fish are baked or broiled at high temps for a reason, but that's just my opinion experience.

 

Anybody else?

 

I'd rather do slow cooking, more beers that way. beers.gif

 

wink.gif

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Canyondiver taught me the "butter poach". Cooking lobster out of the shell, or monkfish, in a mix of butter and oil at about 200 degrees. icon14.gif

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I was reading online about cooking fish at 250 making the finished product more juicy and a bit like a cross between sashimi and cooked fish. Sounds great but would like to hear if anyone has tried this.

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Sous-vide (pronounced /suːˈviːd/),[1] French for "under vacuum",[1] is a method of cooking that is intended to maintain the integrity of ingredients by heating them for an extended period at relatively low temperatures. Food is cooked for a long time, sometimes well over 24 hours. Unlike cooking in a slow cooker, sous-vide cooking uses airtight plastic bags placed in hot water well below boiling point (usually around 60°C or 140°F).

 

Other than poaching, I would be concerned about drying the fish - making fish jerky.

 

Disclaimer: I've not used the sous-vide method, nor have I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express latelybiggrin.gif

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If you're interested to try sous vide there was an article on Serious Eats blog about doing it with salmon on the cheap with ziplock bags and a plastic cooler. To 125*

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View PostSous-vide (pronounced /suːˈviːd/),[1] French for "under vacuum",[1] is a method of cooking that is intended to maintain the integrity of ingredients by heating them for an extended period at relatively low temperatures. Food is cooked for a long time, sometimes well over 24 hours. Unlike cooking in a slow cooker, sous-vide cooking uses airtight plastic bags placed in hot water well below boiling point (usually around 60°C or 140°F).

 

Other than poaching, I would be concerned about drying the fish - making fish jerky.

 

Disclaimer: I've not used the sous-vide method, nor have I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express latelybiggrin.gif

 

 

If you wraped it in foil then it would steam and stay moist right? There is a home sous-vide cooker for a few hundred bucks dunno how good it is. Maybe one day I'll get one.

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Many years ago I'd slow cook American shad about 4 hour at 250F. Scale, head, gut, put a couple strips of bacon on top, then wrap in foil and bake. After 4 hours all the bones are dissolved. Good eats, even better when its cold.

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View PostMany years ago I'd slow cook American shad about 4 hour at 250F. Scale, head, gut, put a couple strips of bacon on top, then wrap in foil and bake. After 4 hours all the bones are dissolved. Good eats, even better when its cold.

 

with the roe or without?

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PeterO - I've never baked shad row. I'm not a fan of shad row. About the biggest row I've fried has been herring row and even that was a bit much for me. I'll stick with frying row from panfish like yellow perch and crappies.

 

If shad are baked as you would bake other fish, like 350F for an hour or so, then you gotta fight a bazillion hair bones, not worth it. But all the bones are gone after 4+ hours at 250F, or at least they've gotten very soft and quite eatable.

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I had shad done that way back in the '70's when they were plentiful. A buddys mom cooked them low and slow with lemon, about 200-250F.

 

No bones left and it was very good.

 

Without roe.

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I can't eat shellfish, but if I'm cooking fish, I never finish it in the oven or on the stove... I always take it off/out/whatever a little before it's done and then let it finish cooking on the counter. that way it's never over done.

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I slow roast salmon with pretty good reults. Place on a buttered pan with more butter smeared over the fillet, 12-14 minutes at 250 degrees, depending on how done you like it. It cooks more evenly this way, stays pretty tender and salmon is fatty enough to not dry out. The butter usually gets mixed with some fresh chopped herbs, minced shallot, dill, lemon zest, pickled ginger, whatever I'm in the mood for.

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