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Boring Bees

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How do we get rid of them?

 

We'd like to have some more entertaining bees around, maybe ones that don't drill holes in our wood.

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nope. they're actual bees.

 

they bore holes into wood... sawdust everywhere.

 

and they're big. big ole boring bees.

 

no fun at all.

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View Postnope. they're actual bees.

 

they bore holes into wood... sawdust everywhere.

 

and they're big. big ole boring bees.

 

no fun at all.

 

We just have the honey bees, and annoying bees that like to buzz around your head while your in the outfield playing baseball cwm13.gif

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From wikismile.gif

Carpenter bees are sometimes dissuaded from making nests in painted or stained wood. Paint is a better deterrent than stain, and bare wood is very inviting to a bee looking for a place to start a new nest. However, X. virginica will nest in almost any soft wood , particularly if it is exposed to the sun. In cases where carpenter bees persist in spite of paint, the edge of the wood can be covered with a narrow strip of flashing or screening, and painted, thus providing a physical barrier.

The eastern carpenter bee is faithful to its home, preferring to lay eggs in the same hole it was born in and hibernated in. Females who leave the natal tunnel prefer to live nearby, often digging a new hole a few inches away in the same piece of wood. Over many years, the bees may almost completely hollow out a single board, or a few boards, without ever touching adjacent pieces. Thus, carpenter bee habitations tend to remain clumped in one area. Because each female produces only a few young bees each year, their numbers grow slowly.

Since previous nests are the primary nests each year, blocking or poisoning nests can often backfire on the homeowner, by encouraging the carpenter bee to bore new nests. Over time the burrowing of these new holes may weaken structures.

An alternative means of preventing nesting in valuable wood is to attract the bees to another location by propping a beam of attractive bare wood where you would prefer the bees to stay. The theory is that the bees will build their nests in the wood you supply for them and stay away from your house. Often, an old wooden shed or barn sustains a population of carpenter bees.

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View PostHow do we get rid of them?

 

We'd like to have some more entertaining bees around, maybe ones that don't drill holes in our wood.

 

 

Do a search in the DIY forum.It was recently discussed. I've had some,invade my fascure board,and sprayed some pesticide in the hole,and filled with caulk.Haven't seen them since.

Supposedly they don't sting.But they sure look like they can put a hurtin on Ya!cwm31.gif

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View PostFrom wikismile.gif

 

Carpenter bees are sometimes dissuaded from making nests in painted or stained wood. Paint is a better deterrent than stain, and bare wood is very inviting to a bee looking for a place to start a new nest. However, X. virginica will nest in almost any soft wood , particularly if it is exposed to the sun. In cases where carpenter bees persist in spite of paint, the edge of the wood can be covered with a narrow strip of flashing or screening, and painted, thus providing a physical barrier.

 

The eastern carpenter bee is faithful to its home, preferring to lay eggs in the same hole it was born in and hibernated in. Females who leave the natal tunnel prefer to live nearby, often digging a new hole a few inches away in the same piece of wood. Over many years, the bees may almost completely hollow out a single board, or a few boards, without ever touching adjacent pieces. Thus, carpenter bee habitations tend to remain clumped in one area. Because each female produces only a few young bees each year, their numbers grow slowly.

 

Since previous nests are the primary nests each year, blocking or poisoning nests can often backfire on the homeowner, by encouraging the carpenter bee to bore new nests. Over time the burrowing of these new holes may weaken structures.

 

An alternative means of preventing nesting in valuable wood is to attract the bees to another location by propping a beam of attractive bare wood where you would prefer the bees to stay. The theory is that the bees will build their nests in the wood you supply for them and stay away from your house. Often, an old wooden shed or barn sustains a population of carpenter bees.

 

yes, but how do you get rid of them?

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View PostTell ya what. When I get to TX you can trade me for some Africanized killer bees. They ain't boring. cwm33.gif

 

I don't have any experience with the Africanized honey bees, but....fire ants...kiddos seem to get into them regularly.

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ive ben chasing these stupid things around with a long handle dip net and squishin em 1 by 1. they aint hard to catch. whoever said they populate slow, my ass cause theyres a shat ton of em all of a sudden, crapping down the siding and all cwm13.gif peaches cant have that, nosir

 

the bee juice spray dont work which is weird. wasps or hornets even snif this stuff they go bags up, ive covered carpenters in it and they just dust it off and buzz away

 

im starting to feel bad. like the suburban pol pot of the insect world, i dont want to be that guy. might have to give the sacrificial 2x4 of harmony a whirl

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View PostApparently you shouldn't, they're good for "nature" Pollinator decline is a serious environmental issue and carpenter bees are being valued increasingly as important pollinators.

 

yes, but the "wood on our porch decline" is bad for staying good natured.wink.gif

 

 

they must die or be relocated.

 

 

but they're nasty big creatures.

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so let em eat my house caster? you wanna deal with peaches? my house is more important than the environment. i just asked icon14.gif

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