Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
chicky

startup inertia

Rate this topic

28 posts in this topic

does anyone actually care? would you not buy a reel because of high startup inertia?

i see so many companies marketing "low startup"...so what?

any thoughts from the gallery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't much care about start up inertia. What really matters to me is that the drag not stutter and jerk after the spool is moving. With the size fish I catch I have little to worry about.biggrin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostI don't much care about start up inertia. What really matters to me is that the drag not stutter and jerk after the spool is moving. With the size fish I catch I have little to worry about.biggrin.gif

 

lol i'm with him ^^^^^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't mean much to me for most of my saltwater fishing because I am genereally using 20lbs test leaders. For bonefishing, though, I think that it can make a difference as leaders are often 8 or 10 lbs in breaking strength. With the abundance of coral an other abrasive materials, the strength can be even less on a well used leader. Any sharp force can snap a leader.

 

Having said all of that, I will let my inner nerd loose. Inertia is the resistance of an object to a change in motion, generally due to the mass of the object. What the reel manufacturers and testers are describing is more a function of the drag's "stickiness" when it first begins to rotate, rather than a function of the spool's mass. In engineering, this property is known as "stiction", a combination of "stickiness" and "friction". It doesn't sound as high tech as inertia, but is more applicable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Low inertia on start is intended to save light tippet. For fast movers like bones, albies, grayling, etc where you're using light tippet you want startup to be smooth because if the drag sticks even a little on the fish's first run at startup you can end up with a snapped tippet.

 

Most people use 16 - 20lb tippet when fishing bass and blues so the sticktion factor is not much of an issue unless you hook into a monster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This fall I was in Michigan swinging flies on the spey rod in clear water for steelhead. We used fairly light tippet and the fish always grabbed at the end of the swing. The hardest part about that type of fishing is that you are not supposed to set the hook or you break off instantly. What we did was to loosen the drag enough so that the fish would actually pull line off the reel before lightly lifting the rod to set the hook. After all hell broke lose we'd have to fumble around with the drag so it was a bit tough to get used to. I think a low inertia or "striction" reel would be very handy in a situation like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it might be an issue with light tippets--but for the most part it is a sales point.

 

Maybe with bones--but do not do enough to say for sure. Albies on the other hand not an issue for the most part. I love to fish 8 or 6 pound for albies and use the Sage 3500d or the newer replacement 6010 --broken a ton off but not the reels fault.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've broken a lot of tippets because my own hand tends to have questionable ability to smoothly let go of the line. I can't think of losing one fish due to drag "sticktion" in salt water scenarios...and I'm not using very expensive reels.

 

Additionally, doesn't a well handled rod help lessen the immediateness of pressure on a drag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tell my wife that I have high startup inertia, she says thats BS, I'm just a lazy procrastinator.

 

I agree that low startup inertia is not so important with most of the fishing I do (stripers) but it's useful for speedsters. I also think, if nothing else, low startup inertia is a positive indicator of a reel's design and the quality of its components.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chicky,

 

With all of the fish I've ever put on the reel, I never had a problem with startup inertia. Especially with albacore. All a bunch of hype for SW but may mean something in FW.

 

Spig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO what protects light tippets is a good flexing rod tip,not startup inertia.You need a good shock absorber first.A lot of tippets are broken well before the fish ever gets put on the reel,especially in FW.In all my readings of guys like Joe Brooks,Lee Wulff and others,I never heard them mention startup inertia,only the importance of a smooth drag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It hasn't been an issue on any reel made in the last decade that I'm aware of. If you're buying 40$ okuma reels off the shelf at wal-mart, you probably don't care anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Low inertia on start is intended to save light tippet. For fast movers like bones, albies, grayling, etc

 

i hate to pick on anyone, but grayling are not fast movers -- perhaps you're talking of a saltwater that i have not heard of, but the whistling sailfish of the north are not fast. again sorry to pick, but i just found that to be too funnybiggrin.gif

 

can't say that i have witnessed a case where it was start up inertia's fault for breaking leader, but i will say that its a pain in the butt on some reels. the old ross canyon reels and all loomis reels are pretty bad about it.

 

i fish for large rainbows in super clear water with light leaders and a lot of start inertia on a reel makes me set the drag lighter that normal to adjust for it. not a big deal as you can always palm the reel for a little extra, but it really scares me when someones fighting a hot fish in the ten pound range on 6 lb leader.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.