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Tommy B

Will a better Reel help with Casting

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Casting farther is relative to your whole setup. A reel filled with line will out cast a reel low on line. A rod rated for 1/2 oz to 2oz, wont cast a 4 ounce sinker for crap, load it right in the rating zone and it will preform better. You'll have to identify your whole setup and baits you will be using, then the pros on this board I learned so much from should chime in.

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Depends on your technique, rod, the weight of the lure/bait, aerodynamics of projectile, type line and test, as well as the reel design. Sounds like you have a spinning reel.

 

Longer, reverse-tapered spool spinning reels can add distance, but the other things above are important too..

 

Can you describe your set up and what you want to throw?

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In your case, you will do better working on your technique than buying a different reel.

 

I read what you wrote, and think that you are looking for an answer that is not related to the issue you are experiencing.

 

There is a reason why driving ranges exist for golfers- it improves their game. Driving ranges do not exist for fishermen, but that does not mean that the same activity will not improve your game.

 

Practice with what you have until you are sure you have learned how to maximize its potential and then move on.

 

Why do I guess this without knowing you? Because you are looking at your reel as the problem.

 

A spinning reel is a storage device for the line. How far a spinning reel casts is largely dependent on how effective you are as a caster, the rod and the wieght you are casting. In this respect, spinning reels are pretty honest. Casting reels will give you the benefit of the doubt: a better casting reel will give a bad caster better distance (conversely, they will punish him worse).

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As said above, rod, casting technique and line diameter are the most important for distance providing your using a spinning reel.

 

The smaller diameter of the line will outcast thicker line.

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Maybe it could be put this way, a better reel won't hurt you ability to fish and cast as much as bad reel. For instance, the Penn saltwater spin-fishers, one of which I fished with for years has a nasty habit of the bail flipping closed on hard casts. So, although a tough, durable reel I would call this a bad reel especially when you watch your twenty dollar plug fly out past the breakers because it has just snapped off.

 

For both fishing and casting, you want a reel to be light in wieght, to cast well (allows for good delivery of line with minimal line twist, tangles, etc...) to have sufficient line backing even after a good cast, it should have good drag system, it should be durable enough to handle the salt without having to break it down for a cleaning after every outing.

 

I think it is still difficult to get all of these things done well in one reel - there is always a trade-off. For instance, the Penn reel you mention are know for being durable in the salt, yet they are very heavy, they often have plenty of backing but cast poorly due to lip/spool design and the lack of a reverse taper on the spool/good line lay from the wind on. Especially, when using braid but even with mono they sometime tend to just blow up on a cast.

 

An example of a good reel that won't hinder your fishing or casting is the Daiwa Tourney 2600. Its light, has an excellent drag system, has the ABS reverse taper spool for good line lay and casting, can be fished in multiple nor'easters and be just about under water before it needs some cleaning, and is not all that expensive. It is deficient in having enough line in the backing during certain surf and casting situations - it too has a trade off.

 

There are other examples of both bad and good reels out there, but the bottom line is you want to pick a reel that will put as few performance obstacles in the way of good fishing or casting. You don't want to be compensating for something that lacks in a reel while using it because that will take away your focus on casting or fishing. A good reel does its job of allowing you to cast and fishs without being noticed.

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Can't get very far with that 50# test Ande!

Seriously, line, weight, rod and reel make up the team. They are all interdependant.

 

AMMO

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Well I got a star rod Steller lite 9.0

with a Penn Power Graph 4000

and 20lb spider Wire

 

 

and the Bail is always fliping closed on me

on hard casts

 

but I think you guys hit it on the head

its mostly a matter of skill and the only way to aquire that skill is with pratice

 

Thanks for your replys and time smile.gif

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An inexpensive reel might not last for years and years, it might blow up with the first 15# blue that hits your plug or bait. But this reel might be a good caster.

 

I agree with what's been said previously, rod, line, lures and casting ability by the person casting all play a significant role in heaving.

 

Practice makes perfect. You said you have a 4000, I'm assuming this is a Capiva, right? This reel has a casting spool, but the internal components don't have the quality as say, a 704z.

 

Take a look at the big picture my friend, there is always a big picture, sometimes we fail to see it. If you need anymore advice, give us a post. you will get the best advice here. Hope you find the right setup. icon14.gif

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Bail snapping shut on the cast, eh?

 

Try THIS...

 

With the bail open, rotate the crank until it wants to close, note the position. Let it close, barely turn the crank so you're just past the point, and NOW open it. Bet the bail doesn't close on the next cast!

 

Most of the time, gravity causes slight rotation in the crank, so the gears turn, and then the bail snaps shut. Using the method described above, the crank would have to go through almost 360 degrees ...ain't gonna happen!

 

Of course, you could always cut the damned thing off!

 

Ammo

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I got one of the cheeper penns

I think its a 4000 or 4 something

 

do any of you think one of the more pricer reels will let me cast longer

 

You received many excellent advices and allow me to chime in.

 

The key to distance casting is technique and having a well balanced outfit! Work on your technique (stance, arm motion, timing and follow through). A well balanced outfit needs to have a well tuned reel, fresh line filled to the rim, and a proper rod that will compliment the reel. In general, get acquainted with your entire set up and practice on your technique.

 

If you want a good casting book, Get the Ron Arra Distance Casting Book. It will help you understand the dynamics of casting and it has many other tips like reel maintenance.

 

Hope this helps.

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