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DougH

Plumbing & Heating Freeze damadge?

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Can some one give me a crash course on freeze damadge?

 

I am looking at a home on sunday that is a foreclosure. It must have been a real nice house at one point. 2000 sq. feet, 1 acre of land, nice town that commands good home values.

 

It looks like they were in preforeclosure in 2008, this year actual foreclosure. And some where along the lines I am guessing that the heat was cut off, and the pipes were not properly winterized or drained.

 

I think the quickest anwser may be that since I have to ask, I can't handle it.

 

That being said I am very handy, and I pick up new skills well. The price is right on the house and the property.

 

I am going to look at the house on Sunday. I am assuming that I should be looking for water damadge around the house to try to get an idea of the extent of the damadge.

 

The baseboard heat is now cold water baseboard, I bet that is a possible area of damadge. Would damadge to a boiler core be visual?

 

What about the worse case. If I had to re rock half a house, and redo the whole plumbing system, kooky.gifcwm27.gif , how should I start estimating the total cost if mostly DIY.

 

Maybe I should run away but it looks like it has so much potential. Damn shame the prior owners / bank let the pipes freeze.

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Unfinished basement as far as I can tell from my drive by. Two bathrooms. I think the heat is powered by an oil fire boiler.

 

My plan is to take a look at the place on Sunday. If I like the layout, and it isn't a total mess I will see about getting some pro's in there to take a look.

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View PostUnfinished basement as far as I can tell from my drive by. Two bathrooms. I think the heat is powered by an oil fire boiler.

 

My plan is to take a look at the place on Sunday. If I like the layout, and it isn't a total mess I will see about getting some pro's in there to take a look.

 

 

Bring a camera, and take pictures.

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Might be a moot point. I just found out that the home is in the mae family, homepath program.

 

They won't accept offers contingent on sale of your current home, and my girlfriends buyers have their own contingency that involves going before the town zoning board. Group of retired nuns, they want to hold services and rent one room to visiting nuns. Although it sounds like a bad punch line it has made this a frusterating process. cwm13.gif

 

I don't think it would be prudent to run the risk of ended up with two mortgages.

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View PostAlso it could be a possible vacated Meth Lab. There are tons and tons of foreclosures that are actually unfit to live in because of the toxic poisons given off by meth.

 

 

It could be but this is a Fannie Mae home so think that they would have disclosed that on the MLS. There isn't a big problem around here with meth labs that I am aware of.

 

They did disclose mold, but who knows about the actual severity of the mold.

 

It may be a little in the basement, or it might be the whole house.

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If you can't test with water to find leaks in the plumbing and heating system, invest in a little air compressor. Buy a gauge and install it on the domestic and heating system. If you have obvious splits that you can see then these must be fixed before you do an air or water test. Some damage can be trapped behind walls and impossible to see. Some cracks and splits in piping and mechanical equipment won't show unless there is air or water in the system.

 

100-125lbs for an hour would be fine for the domestic water system. Close all the valves going to the fixtures, including the HWH. The HWH can be tested with air, just take the T and P and plug it. 125lbs air test to the HWH tank is fine.

 

Test the supply and return on the heat. Isolate the zones from the boiler. 60lbs would be fine for a couple of hours. To test the boiler the T and P must be pulled and plugged. 40lbs for an hour or so is good to test the boiler.

 

If this is too much work for you hire a mechanic. It's better to know now what the issues are, then later down the road after you trade papers.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

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other thing you could do is just bid the house like it all needs to be replaced.

 

forclosure i bought last spring went all winter without being winterized, and i got the house cheap .

 

when i turned on the water to see how bad it was there was only one pipe that had frozen and blew apart a solder joint.

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I am still going to look at it, and that is my plan.

 

I have a friend who is a licensed plumber that will help without gouging me. I am going to factor the price of all new pex plumbing into the price, and pex tools.

 

I will be getting some pro advice on everything if I like the property otherwise.

 

I will report back with pictures on Sunday.

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I thought I would update this thread since every one was so helpful with their anwsers.

 

I am going to pass on veiwing the house. I just heard back from my realtor who had some other agents in the office already inside the property.

 

The pipe burst on the upper levels, and water was flowing for several days. It was actually under deposit and the interested parties at the time went to view the house and come in to a basement with three feet of water, and the ceilings coming down.

 

From their descriptions the entire house, or a large portion would need to be gutted down to studs. Almost all of the walls, and ceiling would need to be completely redone.

 

Maybe for an investment it would still make sense, but I am looking for a house that I can move into in the next two to three months.

 

This would be a huge bite to chew!

 

So for the contractors out there... where would you even start with pitching an estimate for this job??!!

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You estimate a house like that by including demo to the studs, Three 40 yd dumpsters, new boiler, 50% new heating loop, new baseboard units, new flooring, something for damaged doors, windows, trim, appliances, kitchen cabs, countertops, insulation, sheetrock, painting, maybe new service, and something for wiring as the gut job will negate any grandfathering and you'll have to meet the latest codes. (Smoke alarms, basmt sprinklers, GFI's). If you have to pay someone figure 50% of the cost to build the house in your area. You may do better in this economy but watch out for hacks. Probably a good investment property if you can buy it right but if you're using borrowed bucks and you're in a hurry this joints not for you.

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