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Material Quantity

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What are some of the basic tying materials a beginner needs? Also when buying peacock herl/bucktails and etc... how much is enough??? I see a lot of lots on ebay for pretty cheap. Would those lots be sufficient or am I better off buying single items in larger amounts?

 

Thanks

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View PostWhat are some of the basic tying materials a beginner needs? Also when buying peacock herl/bucktails and etc... how much is enough??? I see a lot of lots on ebay for pretty cheap. Would those lots be sufficient or am I better off buying single items in larger amounts?

 

Thanks

 

Being a beginner take in a class near by and/or head to the show in somerset the weekend of the 23rd.You'll get a real education by watching the tyers in TYERS ROW.They are there to answer your questions and help you with what YOU want to learn to tie.Also,you can purchase top quality materials at the show.Remember...You get what you pay for.I'll let others chime in on this one...

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Well "need" is a relative term wink.giftongue.gif .

 

I think if you are just starting you should get the basic tools (vice, scissors, bobbin, thread, mustad 34007 hooks), a handful of saltwater grade bucktails (white, yellow, olive, grey), a pack or two of Crystal Flash (pearl) and a wad of peacock hearl (1/4 ounce is a good start).

 

You might add some stick on eyes, some dumbell eys, and some epoxy if you like. Or just start off with a bottle of Sally Hansen Hard As Nails for head cement.

 

With that you can tie bucktail deceivers and clousers which is a GREAT start. From there you can add some strung saddle and tie hackle deceivers, 1/2 and 1/2's, ect.

 

I always liked the idea of starting with a couple basic patterns and then slowly expand. Each time you want to tackle a new pattern buy the materials you don't already own for just that pattern and tie away. Then move on to another new pattern. Within a short period of time you will have accumulated a LOT of materials, and you can tie almost anything.

 

Good luck, and ask questions when you have them.

 

Alan

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I have a different approach to getting material for starting to tie flies. what I do is buy the assortment packs of materials and when certain materials in the packs run out, just get more fo them, only in the standard bags with only one material of its kind. I then find it a lot easier then having to go out ot get material every time i find a new pattern.

 

Food for thought!

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View PostWell "need" is a relative term wink.giftongue.gif .

 

I think if you are just starting you should get the basic tools (vice, scissors, bobbin, thread, mustad 34007 hooks), a handful of saltwater grade bucktails (white, yellow, olive, grey), a pack or two of Crystal Flash (pearl) and a wad of peacock hearl (1/4 ounce is a good start).

 

You might add some stick on eyes, some dumbell eys, and some epoxy if you like. Or just start off with a bottle of Sally Hansen Hard As Nails for head cement.

 

With that you can tie bucktail deceivers and clousers which is a GREAT start. From there you can add some strung saddle and tie hackle deceivers, 1/2 and 1/2's, ect.

 

I always liked the idea of starting with a couple basic patterns and then slowly expand. Each time you want to tackle a new pattern buy the materials you don't already own for just that pattern and tie away. Then move on to another new pattern. Within a short period of time you will have accumulated a LOT of materials, and you can tie almost anything.

 

Good luck, and ask questions when you have them.

 

Alan

 

I think Alan pretty much said it all. Plus a whip finisher buy a decent bobbin with a ceramic insert. And if you decide tying is not for you,you haven't invested a lot of money. You can always add on as you go. The bay is a good place to get some nice cheap but real good surgical siccors, some of the best I have ever used. I think I picked up a dozen for about $10-$15..

Fly tying Material can cost a nice piece of change so search not only on line fly shops but other options. Craft stores,99 cent stores Sewing supplies ETC & if your looking for anything special post it here & I'm sure someone will know where you can obtain it. Fly Tyers are some crazy people cwm27.gif Some more than others!! Myself included!cwm31.gif

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View PostI have a different approach to getting material for starting to tie flies. what I do is buy the assortment packs of materials and when certain materials in the packs run out, just get more fo them, only in the standard bags with only one material of its kind. I then find it a lot easier then having to go out ot get material every time i find a new pattern.

 

Food for thought!

 

 

 

i find a problem with this is i would have materials that i may never use, by building as you go you wont get overwelmed wich is pretty easy, also lets youget good at a fly or 2 before moving on, then when your ready you move on and add a few more materials, also keeps you from going over your ability, and waisting pricier materials when starting out

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View Posti never really sax this problem. and i always found ways to tie with what i got. never really seemed to waste anything.

 

 

but if your just learning your better to learn proper and then add to not play from the beginning, good technique will get you a lot further if you start with the basics and work your way up,

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View PostWell "need" is a relative term wink.giftongue.gif .

 

I think if you are just starting you should get the basic tools (vice, scissors, bobbin, thread, mustad 34007 hooks), a handful of saltwater grade bucktails (white, yellow, olive, grey), a pack or two of Crystal Flash (pearl) and a wad of peacock hearl (1/4 ounce is a good start).

 

You might add some stick on eyes, some dumbell eys, and some epoxy if you like. Or just start off with a bottle of Sally Hansen Hard As Nails for head cement.

 

With that you can tie bucktail deceivers and clousers which is a GREAT start. From there you can add some strung saddle and tie hackle deceivers, 1/2 and 1/2's, ect.

 

I always liked the idea of starting with a couple basic patterns and then slowly expand. Each time you want to tackle a new pattern buy the materials you don't already own for just that pattern and tie away. Then move on to another new pattern. Within a short period of time you will have accumulated a LOT of materials, and you can tie almost anything.

 

Good luck, and ask questions when you have them.

 

Alan

 

 

What Alan said is useful advise.

 

Tie a few Ray's flies at first. It's a simple tie and a very useful fly for saltwater applications. All you need is some bucktail and a few strands of flash to get started. If money is an issue, tie with white thread. You can use it with any application. If you need to, marker over it afterwards.

 

Tie a few deceivers by adding a few strung saddle hackles building on your bucktail experience. Be neat in all your tying steps. If there's flaws, correct them before the next step. Learn to control the handling of materials. It's good to get into good habits right away. Develop patience and consistency. As your tying improves, buy a few more tying materials and build on your experience.

 

I think at this point in your tying experience, that quanity of a material isn't important. Having more choice of materials will be more beneficial.

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View Postwhat ever your right again amazing

 

 

Dude, he's 14.....I knew everything when I was 14 too...LOL!!

 

At least the kid is interested in fly fishing...not too common these days.

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ctaylor, definetly true, but i have taught a few kids my age to tie flies, and some of them really got the hang of it. they were really crappy, but they still got the hang of it. one of them even did a whip finish by hand with no instruction! Kids my age do have potential with fly tying, but they just never seem to find that potential, how strange....

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View PostDude, he's 14.....I knew everything when I was 14 too...LOL!!

 

At least the kid is interested in fly fishing...not too common these days.

 

 

its amazing though theres alot of guys here that sell alotof flys for atleast a partial living that most of us look up tos fly, and a ton of incredible tyers here in general, im definately not one of them but im not gonna tell tell dave nelson how to tye his flies ,

its been a rough winter and on top of that quit smoking, nerves are a bit shot right now and i let it out

 

but id love to see some of his flys tough critic he is and allbiggrin.gif , mine aint pretty but i show em when i think that they will work, or have worked

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No doubt B.Flies...stick with it, man...I wish I would have...probably would have kept me out of alot of trouble.

 

Lostcentral...good for you...I quit smoking about 3 years ago and I thank god everyday that I was able to put that habit down. It is amazing how that stuff grabs you...you don't realize it until you quit.

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