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parkfront

cracked female ferrule fix

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Hello all,

 

I'm new here and can already see that there is a wealth of fishing good stuff. I searched past posts for answeres, but none fit my situation sooooo..

 

I have a 3/8" long crack on the female side of the ferrule on the upper half of my 10' Hawaiian Gold spinning rod. I'm not really sure if it is graphite or fiberglass, but I'm guessing graphite by the collor and grey dust after sanding.

 

This picture was taken after removing the original finish and thread wrap and light sanding.

525

 

I would like to give it a long lasting repair. I have some ideas, but would like some help heading in the right direction.

 

My ideas:

 

1. add 1/2" of fiberglass or graphite, sand smooth and re-wrap with thread 3/4" up from end.

 

2. rewrap with thread only 3/4" up from end.

 

3. #1 or #2 above, then add some kind of protector that extends a little past the end and wrap again.

 

I rubberband the two halves of my rod together and keep them in my truck all the time and would like to add some kind of protector to keep the female end from getting beat up. I'd like to do the same to my 10' Ugly Stick.

 

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Oh....and specific products and where to get them would help too.

 

Gregory

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Just for a repair, wrapping that with a non stretch material like Kevlar thread will do the job fine. Flood it thoroughly with finish if its the non waxed type. Or use PG on the waxed type and after drying it for a few days give it a coat of epoxy finish. Just wrap tight though

 

I have been wondering if pulling out a few strands of thread from glass matting and using that to wrap like that would work. I haven't given it a go though yet

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Heres my take on this. That crack is likely to continue its journey if you don't cut it out. I would go at least 1/8 of an inch the good side of the crack and carefully saw through the blank. Having done this I would take a really close look to see I had absolutely no crack left. If a bit is left then use 400 wet and dry and a block and smooth it out. Keep end of blank pretty square. you can do this by wrapping a wrap of masking tape around it near the end to act as a guide. Use same tape trick when cutting blank to.

Then it's just a case of re wrapping over the top of the female joint as you normally would. OK you will lose some insertion length but if this rod has had some use it may not be that bad. Whilst you have this crack do not push up anything inside the blank as you will just lengthen the crack and make things a whole lot worse. Don't wrap excessively tightly or you can close up the ID even on a good blank which will not help you at all, as even less of the male will fit.

I fear any other solution will result in the blank splitting further and ultimately breaking if the crack is not taken out as part of the fix.

 

Mike

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One more option would be to over sleave it. Find another piece of blank very close to the same size and taper. Attach the 2 with rodbond, and wrap the ferrule end like it was before. You can make a small epoxy ramp at the end of hte over sleave and wrap a trim band again to give a clean appearance. I would make my over sleave the length of hte ferrule, meaning if the male end goes in 4" that would be my ferrule length. The only draw back to this would be if the rod is very parobolic, you may have a "dead" spot in the rod. Meaning it does not flex at the repair site like it does the rest of the rod. If it is a fast action rod, I wouldnt worry about the over sleave at all.

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An oversleeve is probably your best bet. But if it were me, I'd toss this thing, unless it's a very expensive rod. Cracked ferrules are no good, and if you're anything like me, you'll get failure at the absolute worst time, like when you're trying to get a good fish to the beach. I would certainly toss the Ugly Stik (you can use it to poke your dog or to stake your tomotes), as a rod that cheap is not worth putting the effort into repairing.

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had a similar crack on a rod of mine but it was much longer. i coated it with epoxy. then wrap it with some power pro line (low stretch) coated it again thn put a warp and finish on that. gave it to a friend for is son to fish. fished for 1 season , had fully of blues 10 -12 lbs and some small bass the i broke completely. i think if the crack is short enough and you will still have enough ferrule to work with i would go with Mike O,s recommendation. Seems the crack on mine did travel out from under the 4 in gorilla wrap i put on it. either way it sure wouldnt ever be my go to rod again.

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Thank you everyone,

 

I think Mike O's sugestion of cutting off the crack is the best bet because if I take off a 1/2" , the male end will still have 2-1/2"s inside. That seems like plenty.

 

Oversleeving is gonna be hard...no where to get sleeve material on island and the taper enlarges toward the end....I would have to redo all the existing guides. Oh...there is a guide located along the insertion length. I would think that adding a layer of fiberglass or graphite would achieve the same thing.

 

The Ugly Stik is new and uncracked...just want to do some preventative addition. A lot of people own and use Ugly Stiks here....they stand up to the constant use and abuse. Like the name says...they aint pretty but they work. And.....can't afford to throw usable tools in the trash!!

 

Any ideas on the end protection?

 

Thanks again

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Parkfront,

 

It really should not be necessary to reinforce the end of the female joint on your undamaged Ugly Stick. If you were to strip off all the Guides and get a brass bush turned up about say 0.5 inch long that matched exactally the blanks tapers and glued that on the end fine but very expensive to do and honestly not worth it. It also in my view is not worth putting an extra warp on top of the existing ferrule wrap it will not add much if any extra hoop strength.

 

It would be worth the small extra time to put two wraps on your damaged blank that you are repairing. Put your first wrap on then seal with CP or other very thin varnish/ epoxy and do another wrap on top. Whenever doing ferrule wraps I always insert male section and make a mark on it at the point where it is fully seated ie butting up to end of emale section. I make the mark with a white chinograph pencil. I remove male and then do a double check to make sure it is properly home and the mark is correct. When I have done the thread warp I re check to see that the male can still be inserted to the mark or at the very least close to it. If you over cook the thread tension you can close up the ID and leave yourself with not enough insertion length.

 

If you just want to protect the end of your blank against chipping then just glue on any small piece of plastic or metal tubing that extends a few mm beyond the length of the blank. This will make your UGly Stick even uglier. Perhaps the name Shakespear give to this series of rods is about the most accurate description of a range of rods for all time. LOL.

 

 

Mike

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Parkfront.

If you already did not know - the 2 part thread finish we all call epoxy is really not epoxy at all. It is merely a clear two part thread finisher.

West Systems just came out with a new (true) (Special Clear) epoxy - that is crystal clear and has amazing strength and bonding properties. I use it to bond my cork grips and reel seats/bushings. Their older epoxy that I have been using for the past 25 years is an amber color and does not do well with UV rays. But the new stuff is impervious to UV and drys crystal clear.

So what I would do is apply a little of the West System Special Clear epoxy to the crack and wrap it with waxed dental floss until cured - 24-48hrs. Careful to wipe any that may go through the crack into the female ferrule.

Un-wrap floss and GENTLY sand any epoxy residue off. The job you did on the rod now is overkill.

Then wrap the ferrule with matching thread and coat with the West System Special Clear epoxy as you would do with 2 part thread finish - done - and it will last a lifetime -that part anyway.

 

Downside is that the stuff is frighteningly expensive. To get both parts in the minimum quantity it would run you about $75.

 

If you decide to proceed this way your options are (1) to ship rod to me and I will do it for you or (2) I will ship the two parts in small plastic containers that you can mix at home.

Herb

PS - it would be easier for me to do the job than ship out the epoxy because you need two batches. One for the repair and the other for the coating. and if the epoxy gets out it will be a real mess.

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I ended up cutting off 1/2" and re-wrapping it.

 

I also re-wrapped the ugly stik's female ferrule up past the male insertion length. I wrapped it in black to blend in with the blank color and pup two coats of Flex Coat's color preserver/thread sealer and proceeded to add a first coat of B.D. Classic's Classic Super Coat. Problem....there seems to be a blue tint/hue to the color preserver covered area. The Super Coat seems to be clear where it extends past the wrap. I'm guessing I did not let the color preserver dry enough or the two products are not compatible, or I should have thinned out the color preserver first.

 

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated so I can finish up my repair and go catch some dinner.

525

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Parkfront,

 

Not a clue mate. Black should stay black CP or no CP. My suggestion would be either strip it off and re wrap with Gudebrob black thread natural nylon not the NCP version and apply your usual finish. But if my rod I would not bother I would just go fishing. The quality of your repair is more important.

 

Mike

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if the repair is solid and doesnt need to be changed in any way you could mix up another batch of finish and drop a little black pigment in it and re-coat. you can just get a botlle of testors paint let it settle and get a bit of the settled gunk from the bottom and mix it into you finish.

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