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M. saxatilis

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I never thought research methods could sound so eloquent. This is the best way I know to make fishing sound scientific. What do you think?

 

"The four-person angling crew, consisting of two anglers using artificial flies and two anglers using spinners and bait, systematically cast and retrieve their lures across the entire water surface in each site to sample all available habitats, including deepwater habitats adjacent to the area sampled during electrofishing..."

 

And yes, I'll be the one sampling with flies tongue.gif

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dont pee in the water when they are doing the electrofishing,

 

View PostI never thought research methods could sound so eloquent. This is the best way I know to make fishing sound scientific. What do you think?

 

"The four-person angling crew, consisting of two anglers using artificial flies and two anglers using spinners and bait, systematically cast and retrieve their lures across the entire water surface in each site to sample all available habitats, including deepwater habitats adjacent to the area sampled during electrofishing..."

 

And yes, I'll be the one sampling with flies tongue.gif

 

 

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Be careful M-sax.

 

I participated in a Hudson River Striped Bass Circle hook vs. J hook week long study a couple of years ago.

 

The feds and state biologists supplied the live bait and a bunch of us did the fishing. The area was smack in the middle of the river section that has produced the past three NY State over 50 pound striper records.

 

I caught a few fish and they were promptly pick up and taken to the holding pens that seperated the Cirle hooked from the J hooked fish.

 

When I ran out of bait, one day, I went back to the bait boat being manned by a HR Fisheries Biologist and a retired NYS Fisheries biologist who have been my friends for years.

 

We got to talking about duck hunting and I was sitting on my homemade casting platform on the front to a 14' Duranautic boat and I began to describe to the biologists the last time I took a triple on Mallards up the river a few miles north of our location.

 

Sitting on a bucket and going through the motions of shooting, first the closest drake mallard about two feet off the water, then swinging to the right and up about ten feet above the water and hitting the second one and then hearing my hunting partner say his gun was jammed, I swrung back sharply to the left and brought the gun up to hit a towering third bird.

 

At that point , my boat tilted under me and I fell ass over tea kettle into the Hudson River, in front of both biologists. They jumped into my boat and pulled my silly, wet ass back in the boat.

 

Thus endeth my day of striper fishing. The Hudson River was as cold as hell in early May.

 

So, remember where you are at all times and don't make an ass out of yourself.

 

biggrin.gif

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RJ - That's a great story! As I was reading it I was reminded of a great book published by the American Fisheries Society (AFS) titled Catch and Release in Marine Recreational Fisheries . In it is a great comparative study of Octopus Circle and traditional J hooks and relatedness to hooking mortality of bluefin tuna. More importantly and to the point, there is a paper titled "Effects of Catch and Release on Physiological Responses and Acute Mortality of Striped Bass". I seem to remember there being a connectin between a publication or two in this book and the striped bass fisheries of the Hudson. Interesting...

 

Maybe it was you!

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M. Sax,

 

There there was the MA Circle hook study utilizing 8 anglers with "J" hooks on one side a a "Head Boat" and 8 poles tied to the other side of the boats railing and fished with circle hooks. They were sent to the bottom and adjusted to fish a couple of feet above the bottom.

 

Over a Smithwicks Ale, at the Squires, in Chatham, MA, I was told this study was run out of Woods Hole, MA, and the fishing area was along the shore of Pompanesset and on up to W. Yarmouth, MA.

 

The untouched by human hands poles and bait out fished the human anglers by a 3:1 ration.

 

I never verified it, but I'm sure someone from MA might have participated in this endeavor. wink.gif

 

Brian,

 

My old Aunt Harriet Cleary told me that there was a true Irish Bard traced back in the 8th Century named Thomas with my tribes name ascribed to himself.

 

Reincarnation or genitics? I'll let you decide. You are no slouch at spinning a story yourself, Mully! Your command of the English language is far beyond my capacity to describe an event in all its glory.

 

Somerset, in a week! Rick is coming Friday and perhaps staying over and doing Saturday as well.

 

Sharpen you wit, Rick is an acomplished racontour in the style of Ernest Schwiebert! You can visualize the perfect crystal class and the done to a turn poached salmon served on a bed of watercress when he tells his tales of fishing with the gentleman from the Mainline in the limestone streams of Central Pennsylvania and the fabled Miramachi, deep in the woods, way back and beyond in the Canadian wilderness. He has come a long way from the greasy, smelly, anti-tank ONTOS mechanic the Marine Corps cut loose in 1963.

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