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granpa60

marine batteries

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Do a search in this forum there were some in-depth discussions last year.

 

.... but in a nutshell:

 

Starting batteries are made to start engines and should not be allowed to drain low, or they will die a premature death. The higher the cold cranking amps (CCA) the "stronger" the battery. Any battery that you get should meet the minimum CCA requirements of your engine (check your manual).

 

Deep cycle batteries are made to withstand constant draining and recharging - hence the name deep cycle (very low to high charge). The more Reserve Capacity (RC) the more power (amp/hours) the battery can discharge. These batteries are great for running electronics all day and recharging daily.

 

The best batteries from marine use is a pair of Deep Cycle batteries with enough CCA's to start your engine. In other words, the best of both worlds.

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View PostDo a search in this forum there were some in-depth discussions last year.

 

.... but in a nutshell:

 

Starting batteries are made to start engines and should not be allowed to drain low, or they will die a premature death. The higher the cold cranking amps (CCA) the "stronger" the battery. Any battery that you get should meet the minimum CCA requirements of your engine (check your manual).

 

Deep cycle batteries are made to withstand constant draining and recharging - hence the name deep cycle (very low to high charge). The more Reserve Capacity (RC) the more power (amp/hours) the battery can discharge. These batteries are great for running electronics all day and recharging daily.

 

The best batteries from marine use is a pair of Deep Cycle batteries with enough CCA's to start your engine. In other words, the best of both worlds.

 

 

 

thx much, very helpful.

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On my boat, I go with a dedicated starting battery for the motor, and a dedicated deep cycle battery for my electronics and lights.

 

I have them separated by a Blue Seas Dual Battery Plus switch, which allows both batteries to be "on", but not connected to each other. This allows me to always have both batteries set up for their specific purpose, but does not allow one that might be low to pull down the other. I can also combine them if needed to help start the motor if my starting battery is low.

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View PostWhat is wrong with having a deep cycle battery for a cranking (starting) battery? headscratch.gif

 

Absolutely nothing as long as it has the CCA rating that the engine requires. As a matter of fact, its the best solution that you could have.

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View PostThere are now dual purpose batteries which I find to be very convenient and reliable. I use Nautilus brand, but I know there are others.

 

That's a marketing gimic. Tell me exactly what the characteristics of a dual purpose battery are? I bet you can't, and neither can Nautilus. The reason being, there really is no such thing. Either its a very well made Starting battery or a poorly made Deep Cycle battery.

 

Pay the couple extra bucks and get the deep cycle that can start your engine.

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A friend of mine from another site wrote this:

 

Deep cycle batteries and starting batteries are very different in design and intended use.

 

Starting batteries have thin plates and are designed to discharge and recharge quickly. They produce a quick high amp burst of power which is needed for cranking over an out board or car motor. They produce high amp output but can not sustain this out put for very long. Thus cranking your motor over a bunch or times or for a long time with out starting will kill the battery. The flip side of this is that they also charge back up very quickly and can be charged at high rates (up to 50 amps). These batteries can be charged back up with the outboard or a car motor with out causing damage to the battery or performance issues. Basically starting or cranking batteries are like sprinters, they can run hard for short distances but can't run marathons. They are also not good at long drawn out loads. For this reason they are not good for powering trolling motors or other electronics where the power consumption is low but very long.

 

Deep cycle batteries are designed very different and have thick plates and are very good at producing long duration loads but not capable of producing high amps. These are marathon runners but not good at sprinting. They are designed for long low draw downs and are perfect for the constant draw of a trolling motor or other electronics. They also need to be charged back up slower and at lower amp rates than starting batteries. Charging them at too high a rate will permanently damage the plates and cause performance issues and eventual failure. They discharge and recharge slowly.

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View PostA friend of mine from another site wrote this:

 

Deep cycle batteries and starting batteries are very different in design and intended use.

 

Starting batteries have thin plates and are designed to discharge and recharge quickly. They produce a quick high amp burst of power which is needed for cranking over an out board or car motor. They produce high amp output but can not sustain this out put for very long. Thus cranking your motor over a bunch or times or for a long time with out starting will kill the battery. The flip side of this is that they also charge back up very quickly and can be charged at high rates (up to 50 amps). These batteries can be charged back up with the outboard or a car motor with out causing damage to the battery or performance issues. Basically starting or cranking batteries are like sprinters, they can run hard for short distances but can't run marathons. They are also not good at long drawn out loads. For this reason they are not good for powering trolling motors or other electronics where the power consumption is low but very long.

 

Deep cycle batteries are designed very different and have thick plates and are very good at producing long duration loads but not capable of producing high amps. These are marathon runners but not good at sprinting. They are designed for long low draw downs and are perfect for the constant draw of a trolling motor or other electronics. They also need to be charged back up slower and at lower amp rates than starting batteries. Charging them at too high a rate will permanently damage the plates and cause performance issues and eventual failure. They discharge and recharge slowly.

 

Your friend is mostly right but not really. The "burst" of amps is known as Cold Cranking Amps or CCA. Every battery has a CCA rating. This is the "burst" or amps that your buddy is referring to. Every motor requires a minimum number of CCA's to start.

 

The net/net is if the battery has the CCA's it will start your motor, regardless of whether or not it's a starting battery or deep cycle.

 

Charging rates is bull. There is no setting on a charger except for construction, which can be lead/acid, gel, or glass matt.

 

Again, get a deep cycle that can start your engine.

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Charging rates is bull. There is no setting on a charger except for construction, which can be lead/acid, gel, or glass matt.

 

 

 

If that is true, why do the ProMariner onboard chargers come with 3 different "plugs" to use depending on the type of battery/batteries to be charged and why does ProMariner tell you NOT to charge different battery types at the same time.?

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View PostThat's a marketing gimic. Tell me exactly what the characteristics of a dual purpose battery are? I bet you can't, and neither can Nautilus. The reason being, there really is no such thing. Either its a very well made Starting battery or a poorly made Deep Cycle battery.

 

Pay the couple extra bucks and get the deep cycle that can start your engine.

 

Whoa! Cranky today, but right as usual, its a good deep cycle with enough cranking amps to start my 6.2L Mercruiser with no problem.

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View PostWhoa! Cranky today, but right as usual, its a good deep cycle with enough cranking amps to start my 6.2L Mercruiser with no problem.

 

Actually that was yesterday... So what's it to ya? wink.gif

 

My apologies to any and all that I may have crossed. I was a little cranky yesterday, but I'm in a good mood todaysmile.gif

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Last I looked there was only 2 or 3 companies producing batteries , none in the US. Most fancy batteries are just re-cased same old.

 

Real marine batteries are HUGE, you can't buy them at walmart or most marine shops either.

 

I think it was Exide battery that was here in Watertown MA, they closed down due to idiotic laws, they were threatened with lawsuits because the factory was dangerous to pregnant women but also threatened because they wouldn't hire pregenant women.

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