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Kamel

The last Ice Age was 10,000 years ago.

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the original ice age was in 2002, it was certainly memorable and set the bar

 

the last ice age, dawn of the dinosaurs, was just last year 2009 and well it was kinda meh.

 

thats a facts icon14.gif

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View PostThere will be another.

End of story.

 

 

Or not....

 

 

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/temper...mperature.html

 

"The beginning of the Miocene, 24 million years ago, is when grasses first became common. It's sort of amazing that something we take so much for granted - grass - can be so new! But grasslands, as opposed to thicker forests and jungles, are characteristic of cooler climates. And as Nigel Calder has suggested, grasslands were crucial to the development of humans! We grew up on the border between forests and grasslands. That has a lot to do with why we stand on our hind legs and have hands rather than paws. Later, the agricultural revolution relied heavily on grasses like wheat, rice, corn, sorghum, rye, and millet. As we ate more of these plants, we drastically transformed them by breeding. In return, they drastically transformed us: the ability to stockpile surplus grains ended our hunter-gatherer lifestyle and gave rise to cities, kingdoms, and slave labor.

 

 

So, you could say we coevolved with grasses!

 

Indeed, the sequence of developments leading to humans came shortly after the first grasses. Apes split off from monkeys 21 million years ago, in the Miocene.

 

The genus Homo split off from other apes like gorillas and chimpanzees 5 million years ago, near the beginning of the Pliocene. The fully bipedal Home erectus dates back to 1.9 million years ago, near the end of the Pliocene.

 

Then, at the beginning of the Pleistocene, 1.8 million years ago, the Earth entered an even cooler phase, with jerky temperature variations causing a series of ice ages. Experts call them "glacials", and call the intervening periods "interglacials".

 

The latest glacial began around 70,000 years ago. As you probably know, people were around then. The Neanderthalers died out 35 thousand years ago, and the oldest cave paintings are 32 thousand years old. The glaciers reached their maximum extent around 21 thousand years ago, with ice sheets down to the Great Lakes and mouth of the Rhine, and covering the British Isles.

 

Around 16 thousand years ago it started seriously warming up, and temperatures reached their present levels around 10 thousand years ago. We can see this from oxygen isotopes in ice from Greenland, and we can see it from the rise of sea levels.

 

In September 2006, scientists from NASA, Columbia University and elsewhere published a paper on climate change which shows, among other things, a graph of the Earth's temperature over the last million years or so. You can see a bunch of glacials on this chart. You can see that the temperature is now becoming hotter than since the end of the last glacial. With just one more degree Celsius of warming, it'll be hotter than ever in the last million years.

 

In other words, we may be witnessing the end of the whole cycle of ice ages!

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View PostAll those exclamation points make that paper look like it's written for kids. That guy has an agenda and is on a mission. http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/economics/

 

 

I agree. But he's a mathematical physicist that plays around with Lie algebras. Anybody toying daily with differential equations and Lie theory is going to be a little intense.

 

It's a shame because he is factually correct. He only detracts from the objectivity of the facts by making it appear subjective with exclamations.

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