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mack1703

Question Re: Basement Water Leak- French Drain Or Dig Up Foundation

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I just have a quick question about a small leak I have in only one spot in my basement. I have had multiple people come in for estimates. Two people said I need a french drain and sump pump installed and another said the side of my foundation needs to be dug up and sealed. I dry locked the walls prior to knowing I had a leak because I am in the process of finishing my basement and soon noticed in this one area the dry lock bubbled and I found a small amount of water on the floor but it is not running down the walls. Isnt it true that a french drain would only fix a leak coming from the floor? Or being that I have bubbles on the walls would you tend to think the foundation has a leak. I have also noticed brownish rings where rebarb goes through. I am not sure if you can help me with the information I have given but would appreciate your thoughts. Thank you.

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You have rainwater making its way down the outside of the foundation wall and migrating inside. A French drain won't stop that problem at all. You need to stop the problem at the source. Check all gutters and downspouts first to make sure they are directing water away from the house. Inspect the soil around the foundation for holes and soft areas and re-grade, or compact the soil if necessary.

 

Taking the time to check and correct these items could save you thousands of $$$ in unnecessary repairs.smile.gif

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A french drain would keep water that enters your basement through the walls contained to the trough piping and the pit. If you are in the process of refinishing your basement and you already have the beginnings of a water situation then spend the cash to fix what you can and protect your investment with the french drain. Not sure what you're using to finish the walls, be keep in mind mold loves moisture and paper and wood. $50-$55 per linear foot including a triple pumped pit is a cheap insurance policy if you're dropping good money to finish the basement.

 

I see it almost every day!

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View PostYou have rainwater making its way down the outside of the foundation wall and migrating inside. A French drain won't stop that problem at all. You need to stop the problem at the source. Check all gutters and downspouts first to make sure they are directing water away from the house. Inspect the soil around the foundation for holes and soft areas and re-grade, or compact the soil if necessary.

 

Taking the time to check and correct these items could save you thousands of $$$ in unnecessary repairs.smile.gif

 

 

what he said, better to stop the water from the outside than to deal with it on the inside. try extending you downspouts 6-8' out away from the house and make sure ground around house slopes away from the walls.wink.gif

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if you find that the water is going from the outside surface and making a channel down where the foundation and soil meet, you can pour a loose mortar mix down there to help plug it up

 

this action would be in addition to re-routing the rainwater and fixing the grade, not in lieu of it

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Ok again I'm glad I stopped in this fourm. Last year my girl left hose running in front of the house. The hose was away from the foundation but was leaking at the faucet fitting. Flooded the whole basement. I dug down around the foundation and there was no black tar ,sealer or whatever it's called. Is there suposed to be something and if so how far down would it be?

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View PostOk again I'm glad I stopped in this fourm. Last year my girl left hose running in front of the house. The hose was away from the foundation but was leaking at the faucet fitting. Flooded the whole basement. I dug down around the foundation and there was no black tar ,sealer or whatever it's called. Is there suposed to be something and if so how far down would it be?

 

it's called foundation coating, it starts at the footings and covers right up about a foot away from the top of the foundation, some houses don't have any at all and they never flood,

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View PostAt a minimum the foundation should have been damp proofed with foundation coating, it looks like tar.

It should cover from grade down to the top of the footing.

 

You type fast Matt wink.gif.

 

I have tared alot of foundations in my youth, what a crappy job, and messy,now I pay someone to do it,

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Mack, fix the water outside first, it will be cheaper, last longer and give you more options in the future.

 

Look at the grade of your land around your house. There should be no place at all where water flows toward your house. Make the water stay away from your house.

 

If you have no gutters and water issues inside, you need to put in gutters and control where the water goes.

 

If you have gutters and water issues inside, you need to direct the downspouts to an area away from your house.

 

Doing a "french drain" will help get the water that is getting inside your house, back outside (with a pump). This requires electricity, think about your worst nightmare, a storm when it rains & rains, and the power is off.

 

Fix it outside, Gravity will work in your favor not against you. The "french drain" should be the last resort, not the first.

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View PostYou have rainwater making its way down the outside of the foundation wall and migrating inside. A French drain won't stop that problem at all. You need to stop the problem at the source. Check all gutters and downspouts first to make sure they are directing water away from the house. Inspect the soil around the foundation for holes and soft areas and re-grade, or compact the soil if necessary.

 

Taking the time to check and correct these items could save you thousands of $$$ in unnecessary repairs.smile.gif

 

Excellent advise that worked for me. This past fall I noticed the DryLok bubbling in one corner. Went outside in the rain and noticed that the downspout at that corner of the house was backed-up and flowing out of the pipe. I traced the pipe and found that a root system from a bush had invaded my 4" drain pipe down by the garage downspout.

 

I removed the roots, which looked like a 12" square rag and the pipe drained properly and fixed my problem.

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Thanks everyone - your advice was extremely helpful. I looked carefully & looked at all my grading & it is sloping towards my foundation & 1 of my gutter leaders was off & I just never noticed it. I put an extension on the gutter leader & will pick up a bunch of dirt & am going to regrade my house. Thanks again!

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