Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Mick2360

Harry Reid on Obama the 'light skinned negro'

Rate this topic

79 posts in this topic

Whoops. Embarrassing quote here! More egalitarianism from the party of the people!

 

WASHINGTON, The top Democrat in the U.S. Senate apologized on Saturday for comments he made about Barack Obama's race during the 2008 presidential bid and are quoted in a yet-to-be-released book about the campaign.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada described in private then-Sen. Barack Obama as "light skinned" and "with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one." Obama is the nation's first African-American president.

 

 

Note from Mick2360: The Liberals will now tell us what he really meant! cwm27.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mick, what are you talking about? Harry Reid is a democrat. He didn't mean anything by it. If he was a Republican, you'd be hearing all the libs telling us what he meant by it because it would be different then. Democrats aren't racists. Repblicans are. I thought you knew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100109/.../us_obama_reid

"I deeply regret using such a poor choice of words. I sincerely apologize for offending any and all Americans, especially African-Americans for my improper comments," Reid said in a statement released after the excerpts were first reported on the Web site of The Atlantic.

What other words were there to choose from?

 

And please, libs/dems/commies, don't give me this "Harry Reid is a disgrace no matter what and shouldn't be re-elected" BS. This is the man the Democrats voted to be Majority Leader of the Senate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostWhoops. Embarrassing quote here! More egalitarianism from the party of the people!

 

WASHINGTON, The top Democrat in the U.S. Senate apologized on Saturday for comments he made about Barack Obama's race during the 2008 presidential bid and are quoted in a yet-to-be-released book about the campaign.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada described in private then-Sen. Barack Obama as "light skinned" and "with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one." Obama is the nation's first African-American president.

 

 

Note from Mick2360: The Liberals will now tell us what he really meant! cwm27.gif

 

 

"with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one."

 

Was Majority Leader Reid intimating that Obama's selective use of a "Negro dialect" was politically motivated manipulation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View Post"It's Story Book, Man", "He's Clean" say's 'hair plug Joe'. Just more words of wisdom from the party that gave us the KKK.

Brian

 

 

I bet Majority Leader Reid wishes he could have a do-over.

 

biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can hear Obama's responce "that old honky is just like Joe, a light brained white dude".

 

Of course when our POTUS is done with his reparations plans any hurtful words from his past will be forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostSuch boundless optimism is unrealistic.

 

This from the happy pessimist.

 

lichum.

 

I was quoting someone else from the "Racist Teaparty " thread:

 

View PostOne picture just brought down an entire movement. RIP Teabaggers.

 

One statement just brought down an entire political party. RIP Dems.

 

Neither are likely to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://biggovernment.com/2010/01/09/...negro-dialect/

 

An excellent point............

 

Interesting that the two magazine reporters, Mark Halperin and John Heileman, have been sitting on their knowledge of Reid's remarks for so long. Holding onto such a scoop to promote book sales would be understandable, except that the incident doesn't even make it into the promotional blurb for the book. Just move along, nothing to see here.

Which got me thinking about Trent Lott.

 

You remember him, right? The former Mississippi Senator was Senate Majority Leader back in 2002. Attending a birthday party for then Sen. Strom Thurmond, Sen. Lott made an idiotic statement:

'When Strom Thurmond ran for president, we voted for him. We're proud of it. And if the rest of the country had followed our lead, we wouldn't have had all these problems over all these years, either."

As you can imagine, a firestorm ensued. Kweisi Mfume, then President of the NAACP said that Lott's remarks were:

"the kind of callous, calculated, hateful bigotry that has no place in the halls of Congress"

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) said:

"It was shocking...a piercing voice through the fabric of black America"

Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) went even further :

"I simply do not believe the country can today afford to have someone who has made these statements again and again be the leader of the United States Senate"

It will be curious to see if Sen. Kerry thinks the country can afford to have Sen. Reid as leader of the Senate.

Reid's remarks also got me thinking about former Virginia Sen. George Allen. Running for reelection in 2006, the called out to a Democrat campaign operative at an event, calling him "macacca", an obscure french-colonial insult, generally thought to mean "monkey." (The operative was of indian descent.)

The Washington Post, in particular, seized on Allen's weird comment and made it a major issue in the Senator's reelection. They fanned the flames of the controversy so much that the paper's ombudsman felt the need to review its coverage, noting :

Did The Post overplay the incident? Not initially, but the coverage went on for too long after he apologized. The news stories, handled by the paper's Virginia political reporters, did not go overboard. An editorial was well done. Then the columnists weighed in, along with Style reporters and editorial cartoonist Tom Toles. No one piece was over the line. But when you put it all together, it looked like piling on.

In edition to extensive coverage throughout its pages, the Post ran at least six front-stage stories on Allen's remark.

Today, Reid's remarks warrant only scant Saturday-edition coverage. I should probably take this as a good sign that we've apparently moved beyond the issue of race.

The authors of the book knew about what Harry Reid said for a year or two. They didn't share it with anyone. But yet, there was Trent Lott and George Allen who both said questionable things that were reported almost immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostI was quoting someone else from the "Racist Teaparty " thread:

 

One statement just brought down an entire political party. RIP Dems.

 

Neither are likely to happen.

 

 

Got it.

 

I figured you did not agree with the statement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.