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Sore subject wink.gif.....none of my cucs are doing well this year, and I think the Lemon Cucs either died or the plants very small and haven't produced fruit.....

 

Not the seed or anything, it's just that my cucs in general suck this year....redface.gif

 

Hope to have garden pics tomorrow or Friday

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My neighbors cukes are doing badly, but for some reason my cukes won't stop producing. I've probably harvested 50 or more this season alone across 8 plants or so. My neighbor laughs everytime I bring more over to him saying that he doesnt know anyone else who has been lucky with cukes this summer... I have no clue why they've done well either...

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Well, I'm not sure if it is the weather, or...........

 

I rotate where I plant the cucs on a two year cycle....one year they go along the back fence of the garden and peas go along the side fence, and then the next year I switch them. This year the cucs are along the side fence. But it seems every year that they get planted there, they do poorly, while the years that they go in the back, they do extremely well.

 

This year I ALMOST planted them along the other side fence, knowing the past problems with the other spot, but I had read something early this spring that cucs don't like to be planted near sage (salvia), and that other side has a large sage bush planted right in the middle of the "row", so I opted not to put the cucs there. But in retrospect, they certainly could not have done any worse...redface.gif

 

Funny part is, I planted yellow summer squash and butternut squash next to the sage, and both of those are doing extremely well. In fact, the butternut has more fruit on it this year than I have gotten in the last 4 years combined. Since squash and cucs are closely related, go figure headscratch.gif.

 

The few cucs am I getting are small and badly mis-shapen, and come out looking more like gourds than cucs, and the fruit turns yellow, sour, and seedy quickly. And it's not just the variety, as there are at least 4 or 5 different types.

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View PostWell, I'm not sure if it is the weather, or...........

 

I rotate where I plant the cucs on a two year cycle....one year they go along the back fence of the garden and peas go along the side fence, and then the next year I switch them. This year the cucs are along the side fence. But it seems every year that they get planted there, they do poorly, while the years that they go in the back, they do extremely well.

 

This year I ALMOST planted them along the other side fence, knowing the past problems with the other spot, but I had read something early this spring that cucs don't like to be planted near sage (salvia), and that other side has a large sage bush planted right in the middle of the "row", so I opted not to put the cucs there. But in retrospect, they certainly could not have done any worse...redface.gif

 

Funny part is, I planted yellow summer squash and butternut squash next to the sage, and both of those are doing extremely well. In fact, the butternut has more fruit on it this year than I have gotten in the last 4 years combined. Since squash and cucs are closely related, go figure headscratch.gif.

 

The few cucs am I getting are small and badly mis-shapen, and come out looking more like gourds than cucs, and the fruit turns yellow, sour, and seedy quickly. And it's not just the variety, as there are at least 4 or 5 different types.

 

 

This is what happened to mine, then the plants just shriveled up and died.

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I was jsut reading some more, and one of my books said that it could be caused by Fusarium wilt. Another cause can be poor pollination.

 

After reading that, I found this and other similiar things using Google:

 

Question: Our cucumbers are small and misshapen -- some are curled into a "C" -- and the flavor is bitter. Why is this happening, and is there anything we can do to improve the crop?

 

Answer: The curling could be due to poor pollination or physical damage to the young cucumber. Cucumber fruits are composed of three interior segments or locules. For the cucumber to grow straight, all the seeds in each locule need to be properly pollinated. If one of the locules doesn't develop normally (because of improper pollination or physical damage to the fruit while it's still young) and the other two continue growing, then the cucumber will be curled. Growing cucumbers on the ground can also cause curling. Young cucumbers are growing so fast that if a stem or stick gets in the way, the fruit is forced to grow around it. Trellis your cucumber plants to avoid this problem. Bitterness is often related to water stress. Cucumbers grow quickly once pollinated. If there is any water stress during this period of rapid growth, they will tend to taste bitter. To avoid stress, water the plants deeply once or twice a week, letting the water soak at least six inches deep into the soil, and mulch with hay or straw to conserve moisture.

 

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But the poor pollination theory doesn't explain why mine always do poorly on the side fence, and always do well on the back fence. So I am leaning towards the wilt, as that fungus can stay in the soil for years.........

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