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Steve in Mass

"Vegetable" Based Parchment Paper?

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Short of ordering it on-line, anyone know the type of brick and mortar store that might carry it? Thought I might find it at Whole Foods Market, but no dice. The health food store Donna goes to might have it, but not sure, and don't know when she will be going up there again.

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Revisiting this.........still haven't found vegetable parchment other than on-line for lots of $$$.....but in doing more research, a new question came up.

 

Is standard supermarket bought parchment paper any different than vegetable parchment? headscratch.gif

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View PostRevisiting this.........still haven't found vegetable parchment other than on-line for lots of $$$.....but in doing more research, a new question came up.

 

Is standard supermarket bought parchment paper any different than vegetable parchment? headscratch.gif

 

 

standard parchment is very probably made from wood pulp

 

i wonder if the "vegetable" parchment is made of bamboo fibers since bamboo shoots are properly considered a vegetable

 

i'm just considering any high cellulose vegetable residue apt to be left from a particular crop in quantities that make sense to further process

 

corn stalks?

tomato skins?

sugar cane stalks after squeezing?

rice plants?

pumpkin/squash vines would be a stretch

 

maybe finding out where it is made would give you a clue as to what it is made from

 

probably not any labeling rules regarding how one would define "vegetable" except that it not be wood pulp

 

bet you could make some yourself if you put your creative mind to it!!!

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DB - best info I could find is that vegetable parchment is made by passing a "waterleaf" of pulp fibers thru a bath of sulfuric acid to hydrolyze it, and then rinsing to stop the hydrolysis. There was no indication of what type of pulp the waterleaf is made of.

 

Another source said that now most parchment is vegetable parchment and made from cotton rags or alpha cellulose. Other references say it can also be made from pulp of fir trees, cotton, or flax.

 

Seems much of it is made in China.

 

I checked a box of Reynolds standard parchment at Stop and Shop today, and while there was no indication of what it is made of, it did say made in France.

 

I guess if I can find unbleached, un-siliconed standard parchment (or at least un-silconed), it will serve my purpose.

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View Poststandard parchment is very probably made from wood pulp

 

i wonder if the "vegetable" parchment is made of bamboo fibers since bamboo shoots are properly considered a vegetable

 

i'm just considering any high cellulose vegetable residue apt to be left from a particular crop in quantities that make sense to further process

 

corn stalks?

tomato skins?

sugar cane stalks after squeezing?

rice plants?

pumpkin/squash vines would be a stretch

 

Vegetable (paper) parchment is made by passing a waterleaf made of pulp fibers into sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid hydrolyses and solubilises the main natural organic polymer, cellulose, present in the pulp wood fibers. The paper web is then washed in water, which stops the hydrolysis of the cellulose and causes a kind of cellulose coating to form on the waterleaf. The final paper is dried. This coating is a natural non-porous cement, that gives to the vegetable parchment paper its resistance to grease and its semi-translucency.

Other processes can be used to obtain grease-resistant paper, such as by highly beating the fibers giving an even more translucent paper with the same grease resistance. Silicone and other coatings may also be applied to the parchment. One can obtain grease resistance by waxing the paper or by using fluorine-based chemicals. A silicone-coating treatment produces a cross-linked material with high density, stability and heat resistance and low surface tension which imparts good anti-stick or release properties. Chromium salts can also be used to impart moderate anti-stick properties.

 

maybe finding out where it is made would give you a clue as to what it is made from

 

probably not any labeling rules regarding how one would define "vegetable" except that it not be wood pulp

 

bet you could make some yourself if you put your creative mind to it!!!

 

 

I still think it's used to wrap butter but I've never seen the stuff around on a shelf

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Okay, I am beginning to think that regular parchment will work just fine.

 

The reason for the inquiry - I STILL want to make hot tamales, but I don't want to use corn husks. The reason for that is I want to try to come close to a recipe that I had when I was in NOLA back in 1983 that was made by a friend's aunt. These were made using papers as opposed to the corn husks, and unlike standard tamales, were not big and fat, but more the size of Jones Breakfast sausages. The recipe is similiar to Mississipi Delta Hot Tamales as opposed to Mexican tamales, and the tamales are simmered in a hot pepper based broth. I also believe that the masa is mixed INTO the meat filling as opposed to it being spread on the wrapper and then rolled around the meat filling.

 

And I have a feeling that unless the tamale wrappers are readily available in NOLA, she didn't go out of her way to mail order vegetable parchment.

 

I have a recipe I found that seems very similiar to what she did, and in fact the Ms. Barbara mentioned could well be her for all I know.

 

http://www.cookinglouisiana.com/Cook...s%20-%20JG.htm

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View PostGo for it.

 

I've never had a tamale in anything but husks but have heard of people using foil, parchment, even brown bags cut up.

 

 

you should try my banana leaf wrapped tamales

 

excelente, cabron!

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View Postyou should try my banana leaf wrapped tamales

 

excelente, cabron!

 

 

 

This one? I remembered it, didn't try it.

 

I thought about making green corn tamales last year when we were getting some decent local white corn but never quite got my head around it. Silver Queen- never had that "extra" dozen ears to fool with. Recipes use fresh corn cut off the ear and ground with cheese, some lard, some green chiles, maybe a little milk or cream, and wrapped in the husks it came in.

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