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DDRRedneck500

Carp question(s)

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well, i've been fishing a body of water for a couple years now and have had great success with bluegill, bass, crappie, and catfish, though i've never tried going for carp before. however i know for a fact that there are LOTS of BIG carp in this reservoir. and that knowledge comes from an observation of mine that i have never seen in any other body of water. starting around an hour before sunset from spring through early fall, the carp start to jump. now not just a little splash on the surface, but carp actually launching their bodies almost completely out of the water. i've heard about on the mississippi carp doing this when a motot boat drives by, but the carp here are doing it apparently unprovoked. every couple minutes or so we just here what sounds like a kid jumping in the water, and sometimes we look over in time to see 20-40 pound carp jumping out of the water.

 

Any idea WHY they are doing this??? yes i know many fish when feeding on the surface can make quite a bit of commotion... but CARP? i've never even heard of them hitting the surface for food. normally they are bottom feeders..

 

and question number 2: if iam going to target these fish, would when they are behaving like this be the best time to target them? or might this activity be spurred on by some other factor than hunger making this time less than optimal? if so when should i target them?

 

thanks for any info.

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I don't exactly know why those fish do that but I do know that they are difficult to catch the ones that jump and the skittish ones that run and those just cruising the shore are nearly impossible to get. Look for carp that are feeding with there noses down to the bottom. These are feeding and are fairly easy to catch. In most cases you won't be able to see them any way but don't waste your time on the jumping ones they are not going to be easy

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I think, and I may be wrong, that it has something to do with the breeding season, if it's in the spring time. If not, I've also heard that they breach just as whales do, to rid themselves of parasites attached to their gills.....again, I may be wrong, but it's something to think about.

 

On another note, try a piece of bread crust, unweighted, floating on the surface at dusk/night....you may run into some heavy duty fish!

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View Post i've heard about on the mississippi carp doing this when a motot boat drives by.

 

I heart.gif carp fishing.

Don't wanna eat them.

 

Some American waterways have been invaded by the Asian carp, a non-native species.

 

When they sense a motorboat they jump high and sometimes hit people standing up in boats, knocking them down.

 

newipologo2.gifHomeSearchBrowseAbout IPOStaffLinks

Asian Carp Invasion Fish farm escapees threaten native river fish communities and boaters as well.

 

STORY BY P. J. PEREA

PHOTO BY ERIC GITTINGER

Illinois residents along the Mississippi, Ohio and Illinois rivers have been subjected to a strange sight in the past year�flying carp. It's not unusual for bighead and silver carp to land in boats, occasionally bouncing off shocked passengers, injuring drivers and, in some cases, causing damage to the boats. These carp have a habit of jumping when disturbed by the wake of a passing vessel.

 

oi0205081.jpg

INHS biologists Eric Ratcliff (left) and Ben Lubinski struggle to lift a trammel net full of 20- to 30-pound bighead carp.

Contrary to local lore that these fish are mutant carp from some weird experiment, they are actually escapees from the Arkansas aquaculture industry.

In their native China, their fast growth and ability to filter out algae and zooplankton while feeding made them an ideal aquaculture fish species. They were brought into the United States to control the algal blooms in catfish ponds and possibly provide a secondary market as a food item. But when the record flood waters of 1993 and 1995 along the Mississippi River inundated many fish farms, these fish were released into the natural system.

The fertile waters of the muddy Mississippi provided a nearly unlimited amount of food for the prolific and fast-growing fish, and soon their numbers skyrocketed. It wasn't long before the largest of the bighead and silver carp were damaging fishing gear.

With the potential of reaching 100 pounds, the bighead and silver carp are rapidly moving up the Mississippi, Ohio and Illinois rivers and, like a school of aquatic bullies, taking over critical backwater areas used by many native fish for spawning. A recent backwater fish kill in Missouri revealed that more than 90 percent of the fish occupying the backwater were grass, bighead and silver carp. Biologists monitoring the rapid growth and movement of the Asian carp populations in the river systems in Illinois are concerned.

Mark Pegg, the director of the Illinois Natural History Survey Illinois River Biological Station at Havana, worries that the fish pose a serious threat to native fish.

"These fish specialize in feeding on zooplankton (small crustaceans) and phytoplankton (small algae), which is the food base for all river fish," Pegg explained. "Larval fish must compete with these filter-feeding carp, and they also risk being eaten themselves."

Commercial fisherman have had a tough time selling the plentiful, fast-growing fish. The smaller fish can be scored and sold as a tasty fried fish item like the buffalo fish. The larger fish, however, are difficult to process, and the larger bones do not score easily. This makes them a tough sell to many consumers who expect their fish to be boneless.

Besides being hard to market, the fish are tough on boaters and boats, and are considered a potential threat to commercial and recreational boaters. Tales of large bighead and silver carp crashing through the windshields of vessels are becoming common.

When a carp the size of a bowling ball smacks into you, it is a potential trip to the hospital. Just ask Eric Gittinger, a fishery biologist with the INHS, who studies the fish populations of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers.

Gittinger has the unenviable distinction of being struck by Asian carp 12 times. One hit to his neck was severe enough that he had to see a doctor and undergo physical therapy. He is still suffering from chronic pain related to his injury.

"I was hit three times in 2001 and nine times in 2000," Gittinger said. "These things can launch themselves 10 feet vertically in the air and jump up to 20 feet horizontally. Most of the fish that jump are 5 to 15 pounds."

Gittinger theorizes that the jumping is a method of avoiding predators.

Unfortunately, these fish are here to stay. With established populations on the lower reaches of our major rivers, it is just a matter of time until one crashes into a boat near you. 8 OutdoorIllinois

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hey,

 

in the spring time, carp are jumping and splashing because this is when they breed. it can be tough to catch them during mating season which is usually end of may to early june in my lake, this is because they are more interested in breeding than eating.

 

during the summer and early fall carp are jumping to clean themselves off a bit. being bottom feeders they get dirty quickly. not too sure about parasites because ive never caught a carp with them.

 

during this time of year, if you know where the carp are just put some corn on a treble hook with a small weight and hang out. most important thing about carp fishing is be patient! they swim around constantly looking for food so it may take time before they come across your bait.

 

any other questions let me know

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Interesting carp story....

 

I visited Italy in April of last year to spend time with my girlfriend while she studied abroad...

 

We spent a full day at Villa Borghese, which is basically the Central Park of Rome. We rented a little row boat on this tiny pond within the park...

 

I'm rowing, and I'm watching these turtles and awesome little native salamanders running along the brush and cover on the lake. Of course, I'm looking for fish. I see a couple smaller panfish-looking type fish, and then, literally out of nowhere, I see this carp....no joke, it must have been at least a 50 pound fish, it was so big it frightened me for a moment. Then, I see another one, and another one...I realized this entire pond was CRAWLING with ENORMOUS carp! Seriously huge fish, big enough that they literally startled me when I noticed them, on a liter of wine, of coursetongue.gif

 

The entire time, all I can think about is, "I wish I had my ultralight gear and a can of corn....I just wanna see how big these mofos are!"

Just thought I'd share that little story....I love carpbeers.gif

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Mbrogan87 hit it dead on, in the spring they jump for breeding reasons and such, and durring the summer and fall they jump to clean themselves. The jumping carp you hear about in the Mississippi, Missouri and many other rivers are the invasive asian species, common or german carp do not jump when they hear a boat motor, they run the other way.

 

You can use corn, dog food, dough bait, flyrod, many many different ways to chase these bad boys, make sure you know how your drag works and that it works well, you cannot horse a carp you will have to play them the initial run is always the worst one and then it's just a waiting game to see who gets tired first. Even a 10lb fish will pull drag with 15-20lb line and a stiff rod. Hook one up and hold on for a minute then start winching it in when he decides to run away again let him go, then start in on him again.

 

 

Steve

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RE ""I wish I had my ultralight gear and a can of corn" or the flyrod comment...You guys are crazy! That would take forever! :-) I use my surf rods with 50lb braid and 30lb fluro leader on a fish finder rig. After having some hooks straightened, I switch to little Gamakatsus and haven't had a problem. I also always use corn.

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View PostRE ""I wish I had my ultralight gear and a can of corn" or the flyrod comment...You guys are crazy! That would take forever! :-) I use my surf rods with 50lb braid and 30lb fluro leader on a fish finder rig. After having some hooks straightened, I switch to little Gamakatsus and haven't had a problem. I also always use corn.

 

I here ya brother every time I mcatch one lighter than 10 pound test I have to replace the spool of line cause they streach it so much I like 20 pound.

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View Postjust put some corn on a treble hook with a small weight and hang out.

 

any other questions let me know

 

Isn't catching them with a single hook better for the carp? I would think using a treble would cause harm to the fish.

 

I'm only reffering to Common/Mirror Carp.

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View PostIsn't catching them with a single hook better for the carp? I would think using a treble would cause harm to the fish.

 

I'm only reffering to Common/Mirror Carp.

 

I get away with size 6 or 8 gamakatsu's....then again, I don't really do the classic "cast and wait" technique for carpsmile.gif

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Ok redneck, I don't know much about why they jump, so I won't talk about that. As for how to target them I wouldn't consider myself a carping expert, but I have caught them. First off you have to understand some lakes are different then others. For instance, I fish a lake where you can literally throw a few peices of corn on a small hook, and wait about 10mins and you'll most likely get bit. In this particular lake they will even hit worms, and they are not the least bit shy, it is pretty easy to catch them here and there are a good population of them. Now in a totally different lake I fish, there is a good population of carp, and they are really really shy, if you are standing on the bank and they see you move, they will stay away and getting them to bite will be nearly impossible. In this lake I find its best to quietly walk around the pond wearing polarized glasses, I try to see where there are a few hanging out, and then (while standing 3-5feet back from the waters edge so they don't notice you) I make a cast to the general area they are in. I then proceed to sit down to lower the chances of them noticing me. So depending on the lake your fishing the carp may be shy and hard to catch, or not easily spooked and hit as well as sunnies.

 

From what I imagine all carp are catchable, though there is a particular lake I fish where I just can't figure them out, I know there are plenty of carp in there as I see them all over the place, but despite my efforts I just can't get them to bite. The carp in this lake are extremely shy, and the least bit of movement will keep them away from you.

 

As for what baits to use, there are two that work best for me. Which is bread and corn. The bread you can fish 2 different ways. You can fish it on the top by breaking off a peice about 1 1/2 - 2 inches long by about 1inch - 3/4inch wide. Then "doughing" a small amount of this peice on the hook, while leaving the rest fluffy to keep it on the top. Then cast and let it float around, the carp will come up and eat it right off the top. The 2nd way to fish the bread is to simply roll it into a ball just a tad smaller then a pinball, but a hair larger then a marble. Hide the hook into this ball of bread, cast out and wait. Only problem with fishing bread is the sunnies/cats will sometimes rip it up on you, I've even caught bass on rare occasions with bread balls cwm13.gif. As for fishing corn, I like to take about 3-5 kernels and fill up a size 8 salmon egg hook. I then cast the corn weightless if I can get away with it, as I feel the least weight possible will keep the fish from spitting, I also use the bread weightless.

 

I will also chum a handful of corn in the area I plan to be fishing, same goes for bread (if you can manage to do this without calling in the calvary...aka the ducks/geese).

 

Mainly I'd say your biggest concern is finding out how shy/picky the carp are in the lake you plan to be targeting them in. If you try the bread/corn tactic with no success I'd suggest you be more sneaky, meaning stand further away from the bank so they don't see you, or sitting down and trying not to move too much after you make your cast, basiclly act like your hunting deer. Then again, if the carp aren't shy at all in the lake you'll be targeting them in, you could probably do a dance at the edge of the water and they'd still bite (but I wouldn't recommend it wink.gif).

 

Even though this all sounds very complicated, trust me when I say its worth it, they will really fight you hard, good luck and feel free to let me know how it all goes.

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lmao .i was kayak fishing n saw couple kids on shore fishing,then suddenly i heard a big splash like a boulder was thrown in the water so i stared at the kids thinking they were throwing rocks at me but then realized that it was too far for the kids to throw the rock where the splash was. next i saw a big ass carp out of the water father away. i thought they were jumpin out of the water to eat the dragon flies that were flying around didnt know they were cleaning them selves lol. but sure startled me when they were jumpin around me hehe.

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