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Ben Lippen

Stripping stain/dye from wood trim

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Guys, I have a couple of mahogany pieces/cut-offs ( 1 x , 3" cove, 2" cove) that were waste, leftover from a job awhile back. I've ben using up some of the 1 x cut-offs for different projects, and finally found a use for the cove cut-offs. The thing is, it was covered with a combination stain and dye, that makes it nearly black. A real shame to do that to beautiful wood. I've ben sanding the flat stock with a belt sander as I've used it to remove the stain.

However, unless I really get after it or run it through the planer, I still have these dark pores that definitely don't look good sometimes. But then I'm changing the size of the material, which I don't always wanna do. And I obviously cant treat the cove pieces the same way.

Anyway, before I start googling, does anyone have any leads on safe, non-toxic stuff to use to strip this stuff?

The greener the better smile.gif

If it's between harsh stuff and hand sanding, I'll sand.

 

Thanks smile.gif

 

Ben

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Mahogany is a real toughie because its relatively soft so the stain goes deep, and its a very porous wood so stain removers and bleaches can't go deep enough to work.

 

I had to strip a mahogany hope chest a few years back. I was able to lighten it up considerably, but it still was not back to its natural color.

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John,

We used to play around with some antique Chris Craft's in the shop.

The only thing we had luck with was Alkali Fortified M/C, which is a Marine grade Methylene Chloride Stripper, NASTY STUFF!

Most times we would remove a bottom plank and run it through the planner to get the paint off, that way we could use any mahogany on the underside and the stuff we planned would match the original. When thickness was an issue, we'd use the above in the paint booth. It will work, but just watch the open flames and the brain cells... like I did wink.gif .

Rob

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How about roughing it up a bit, applying some Kilz or Wil Bond and then painting it? Is it for something that will show or for your work bench or something?

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View Postcould you offset it with some pore filler like Behlens

 

 

There you go. Then go over it with a lighter color Stain and call it 'Leopard Mahogany' and charge an 'Arm and a Leg' for it!

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View PostThere you go. Then go over it with a lighter color Stain and call it 'Leopard Mahogany' and charge an 'Arm and a Leg' for it!

 

 

cwm27.gif

I thought of the exact same thing at work today cwm13.gif

Leopard mahogany icon14.gif

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Ben they make a crystalized bleach that will do the trick .. When I refishinished antiques we got our supplies from a company called "Qwik Clean (SP)" in Dover Delaware .. I dont know what these guys are talking about because it works on the worst of stains .. I was in this business for 10 years and I did it all . Insurance work , Water damage , Fire Damage .. I was one of the best in this state for repairs and finish .. I dont see how things could have changed that much in 9 years since I did this .

Good luck and if you have questions I'll put you in touch with someone who will give you the answers you need .

 

A good overflow system gets anything out because it doesnt let the stain seep back in and whats left the bleach will take care of .. I can make Mahogany look like Oak wink.gif

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