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VictorS

fishing deep water with worms

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so i went out to day and tried fishing some deep water with a 3/16 tru tungsten worm weight with a 7 inch power worm....i am usually fishing water around 6-8 ft......has anyone had good sucess fishing the middle of a lake of deeper parts....seems almost everytime i go out i see everyone fishing the banks .......ive also used jigs shakey heads etc....but the try tungsten worm weight set up seems like it could work real well if the fish are there....wanted see if anyone has used this technique thanks....(the obvious is get a fish finder which i didnt have today)

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Its a good approach in the summer and later in the year as winter approaches. I feel most of the bass especially the bigger bass stay deep during the day and move shallow as it gets dark and into the night. There will also be bass that stay shallow all day but I think most hunker down deep during the day.

 

Try a carolina rig with a worm, senko, lizards, etc. It will give you a good idea of the bottom and any structure and you can cover a good amount of water fast. Since you dont have a sonar you arent going to be able to pinpoint one piece of structure, you are going to need to find it through trial and error. If you get a sonar look for creek channels, points, old xmas trees, etc and target these areas.

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Fishing deep water without sonar requires more patience than it's probably worth. But that doesn't mean you have to keep pounding the banks like everyone else is doing. You can fish the areas that bass use in transition to and from deeper water. They are found in places where deep and shallow water are really close to one another. Depending on the lake, sometimes you can look at they lay of the land above the water and notice an area that has a point or maybe a steep dropoff. You can quickly guess at the depth by counting how many seconds your lure takes to reach the bottom. Fish will suspend themselves in the middle of a dropoff. Fish will also hold just off shore on either side of a point. Its a little easier to fish these places than going blind in the middle of the lake. The fish won't always be there just llike they won't always be in shallow water. But if you can find a pattern, it will often work the same all over the lake.

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I've been fishing deep with a large chartruese crankbait and nailing some nice bass. I agree that this is more of a 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon tactic. Early a.m. its spinnerbaits or poppers in skinny water.

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Going deep is deadly right now. Winner in a local tournament on the East End last week was won with 24 lbs, for 5 fish!! All fish caught in 10- 15 feet on a 5" power worm and 5/16 tungsten weight pegged.

Lunker was 6.20 lbs caught in 12 feet on a 1/2 oz chatterbait slow rolled. GO DEEP!!!biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifcwm40.gifcwm40.gif

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I prefer fishing deep because I'm targeting trophy bass and pickerel that feed on perch & perch are primarily deep bottom feeders themselves...not to mention water temps, sunlight etc.

 

been using texas rigged worms/grubs w/ bullet weights, weigted inline spinners w/ weedless hook, bucktail jigs w/ sluggo and crankbaits. last sunday I bagged a 5lb LM on a Giant/Super shad rap, perch pattern, out in open water maybe 10' depths. caught my PB pickerel, 6lbs + on a texas rigged worm with a 1/2oz bullet weight.

 

I had a depth finder a few years ago so I was able to learn some things about the countour and deep structure

 

go deep!

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Deep is relative. How deep? Deep on one water might be 10ft where as another it might be 30ft. Without electronics its like shooting a needle in a hay stack for the most part unless you are fishing visible structure such as the tail end of point that extends into deeper water. It also depends on the fish and bait in the water you're fishing, along with what kind of on shore structure there is and if the water level fluctuates through the season or stays steady.

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victor, there is at least one good book with topographical maps of alot of NJs lakes, even some smaller lakes.

 

this could help you find structure like points, bends in channels, etc. it even labels brushpiles and rocky bottom in some lakes.

 

PM me if you want and I'll see if I can dig it out of my collection to give you a name.

 

blindly fishing deep water on a lake bigger than a few acres would be one of my last choices.

 

ALSO, read the surrounding land. if it is along, narrow impoundment, a sharp bend in the lake probably means a bend in the channel and possibly a point jutting into it, for example.

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thanks for all the advice i went out today and actually did really well.......was fishing pretty deep water from 10-20 ft......i used a 1/4 stand up jig with a cabin creek spider grub......caught bout 7 fish.....one perch which had to be about a lb....also a bunch of smallies biggest was bout 2lbs nice fish......also i think a large crappie couldnt tell he fell off b4 i could land him......seems like fishing the deep water now is key

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View Postthanks for all the advice i went out today and actually did really well.......was fishing pretty deep water from 10-20 ft......i used a 1/4 stand up jig with a cabin creek spider grub......caught bout 7 fish.....one perch which had to be about a lb....also a bunch of smallies biggest was bout 2lbs nice fish......also i think a large crappie couldnt tell he fell off b4 i could land him......seems like fishing the deep water now is key

 

 

Absolutely true!

 

Especially now because it's the middle of the summer. You can fish the shallows, there are some fish that will stay there but to get quantity as well as quality you have to go deep.

 

I find that during the morning and evenings are the best times to fish the shallows during the heat of the summer. During the middle of the day (11-3 or 4ish) the largemouths tend to stay deep.

 

As for smallmouths they stay deep for pretty much the whole summer with few exceptions. You can also try deep diving crankbaits for smallmouth as well as largemouth and with those you might be able to avoid catching smaller fish such as bluegill, crappie or even smaller bass. Unless you want to catch all those, which is completely acceptable, then I would stick to smaller soft plastics.

 

 

Good luck, beers.gif

 

-Tommy

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