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Affordable = Not Affordable

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I keep thinking with the debate about affordable healthcare, that the last two projects the government took on to make something affordable, the price rocketed through the roof.

 

Housing and College Education

 

Trought Slayer was complaing that his healthcare was costing him $800 and other insurance carriers was about the same. His logic was that comptition (or lack thereof) was not driving down the cost enough.

 

You don't need but less than a handful to create a floor in pricing and would suggest that $800 is what it costs.

 

 

If you required insurance companies to lower that premium, they would stop doing business in that state.

 

 

If yoiu gave TS and teh masses access to funds (tax breaks, cash ect) to help pay for that insurance would the same thing happen to the cost of healthcare that has happened to the housing market and the tutition?

 

 

Would the demand for healthcare go up, and so doctors would start charging more?

 

 

Here is another thought:

 

I think the biggest problem is individual insurance (group insurance is less of an issue).

 

Why not do something that state do for car insurance. Require that insurance companies that provide group insurance in a state provide access to indiviuals an basic plan with competitive rates. To mitigate the pre existing condition problem, make that an assigned pool program. You apply for the insurance through the state, who then assigns to by lottery to an insurance company.

 

 

This reducuses the risk of an individual situation to the insurance company.

 

 

I would also tie in that the rates you pay carry penalties for smokers, obese and other persons who voluntarily make themselves high risk.

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I am pretty much open to any changes regarding our healthcare system but government run healtcare.

 

To say it simply, I feel its at a unsustainable track and pace. I also think its something that needs to be taken care of sooner rather then later.

 

While Im not happy about the government run healthcare plan, at least the healthcare issues are being discussed by everyone now. Hopefully some real working ideas will come out of it.

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View PostI am pretty much open to any changes regarding our healthcare system but government run healtcare.

 

To say it simply, I feel its at a unsustainable track and pace. I also think its something that needs to be taken care of sooner rather then later.

 

While Im not happy about the government run healthcare plan, at least the healthcare issues are being discussed by everyone now. Hopefully some real working ideas will come out of it.

 

I think WE ALL can agree with this. What is so wrong, and downright scary, is how hellbent Obama is on ramming this through, NOW!! He is acting like we are all going to die next week if we don't, and his tone about sound more like a threat, than a voice of reason, and hope.

 

I don't like it at all. It's too fast, and too pushy. I feel like he's a salesman, annoying the crap outta me. "

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View PostI think WE ALL can agree with this. What is so wrong, and downright scary, is how hellbent Obama is on ramming this through, NOW!! He is acting like we are all going to die next week if we don't, and his tone about sound more like a threat, than a voice of reason, and hope.

 

 

I don't like it at all. It's too fast, and too pushy. I feel like he's a salesman, annoying the crap outta me. "

 

I agree. While I do want urgency on this matter, not so much though that more mistakes are made.

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These guys dont get too upset much....

 

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Three of the world's biggest drugmakers posted better-than-expected quarterly earnings on Wednesday and gave bullish forecasts for the rest of the year, demonstrating the industry's resilience in the weak economy.

 

Results from the world's top two drugmakers -- Pfizer Inc and GlaxoSmithKline -- and Eli Lilly and Co follow the upbeat report earlier this week from another industry titan, Merck & Co .

 

"The big theme is that pharmaceutical sales are largely holding up in this economic downturn," Morningstar analyst Damien Conover said. "It reiterates the point that healthcare and pharmaceuticals specifically are largely resilient to economic downturns."

 

The strong forecasts contrast with doubts about the industry's long-term outlook, as a dearth of new products and generic competition are forcing the companies to rely on mega mergers and cost cutting to shore up profits.

 

Such cost-control efforts buoyed Pfizer, the world's largest drugmaker, which symbolizes the industry's woes.

 

Pfizer's shares rose 3.4 percent after it reported better-than-expected earnings as cost-cuts took hold, and the company raised its full-year forecast.

 

Shares of global No. 2 drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline rose less than 1 percent as it posted profit slightly ahead of targets and predicted flu vaccine sales would spur second-half strength.

 

Lilly boosted its full-year forecast, although its shares gave back initial gains after the Indianapolis-based drugmaker cautioned that a currency benefit to international inventories that boosted first-half results would not be repeated.

 

Despite the solid results, the outcome of U.S. health reform efforts and fears of drug price controls remain a "big question mark" hanging over the pharmaceutical industry and preventing investors from diving in, said Peter Jankovskis, co-chief investment officer with OakBrook Investments

 

"It's certainly encouraging that they've held up well and are able to advance forecasts going forward," Jankovskis said. "Perhaps once this cloud lifts, it will bring people back to the sector and to the industry."

 

Rival drugmakers Roche , Bristol-Myers Squibb and Wyeth are due to report on Thursday.

 

THE NUMBERS

 

Pfizer's second-quarter earnings fell 19 percent as the strong dollar crimped revenue across its product line.

 

The world's largest drugmaker earned $2.26 billion, or 34 cents per share, compared with $2.78 billion, or 41 cents per share, in the year-earlier period.

 

Excluding special items, the New York-based drugmaker earned 48 cents per share, a penny better than analyst expectations, according to Reuters Estimates.

 

Pfizer sales fell 9 percent to $10.98 billion, shy of the $11.26 billion estimate, but revenue would have been generally unchanged without the impact of the strong dollar, which weakens the value of overseas sales.

 

Pfizer has been cutting jobs and other costs to shore up profits as its top-selling medicines endure generic competition and other pressures.

 

"As expected, Pfizer delivered solid cost management in the second quarter," Leerink Swann analyst Seamus Fernandez said in a research note.

 

Glaxo's pretax, pre-restructuring profit in the second quarter was 2.25 billion pounds ($3.7 billion), equivalent to earnings per share before major restructuring charges of 31 pence (about 51 cents), up 14 percent, on sales up 15 percent at 6.75 billion pounds ($11.07 billion).

 

Analysts had forecast Glaxo EPS of 29.8 pence (about 50 cents) and sales of just under 6.7 billion pounds ($10.99 billion), according to a Reuters poll.

 

The British drugmaker said growing sales of new products and its portfolio of flu products should help drive its improving performance into the second half of the year as the heavy impact of generic competition to its formerly patented drugs begins to abate.

 

Lilly's net income rose 21 percent to $1.16 billion, or $1.06 per share, in the second quarter. That compared with $959 million, or 88 cents per share, in the year-earlier period, when Lilly had a favorable tax rate.

 

Excluding special items, Lilly earned $1.12 per share. Analysts on average expected $1.02 per share, according to Reuters Estimates.

 

Lilly said it expects to launch its long-awaited blood clot-preventer Effient, which will vie with Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol's Plavix, in the United States in early August.

 

But Leerink's Fernandez noted that overseas sales of the drug showed no growth in the second quarter, despite introduction in several new countrie

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The problem is the illegals, welfare cases. They clog up the emergency rooms across the nation. We foot the bill. Another buch of awesome people are the people who sue for every little thing, and make the doctors do a 1000 tests just so they don't get sued.

 

Get rid of Illegals, and stop these bloodsucking lazy SOBs that make a job of having babies and collecting welfare, and get rid of the people who sue for money...

 

Then the insurances companies and hospitals can not say a word because of the above mentioned teat suckers... They will have to lower rates because they don't have to worry anymore.

 

Things are so effed up because of the Progressives and their way of thinking. This is why these above mentioned people get away with this crap...mad.gif

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