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paranoidjack

My first 60 hours....

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I know fishing is a learning curve, so I'm dedicated and patient.

 

I have used lures (kastmasters, poppers, fake worms), and baits (mackerel, squid, sand eels, live eels.

 

I have gone out 12 times. High tide, low tide, in the middle.

 

Brewster Seaside, Sesuit, Pleasant Bay, West Dennis, Smuggler's Cove, Barnstable Harbor, and the Canal once.

 

The more I go out, the fewer bites I seem to get, and have not caught even one fish yet.

 

I am insanely frustrated...lure fishing I can understand, but c'mon...baiting a hook and letting it sit for 10 minutes???

 

A 5" perch would have made me happy. Really, it would.

 

Most of the time I've gone alone as I don't have many friends that fish, so I'm modeling myself after what I've researched, and talk to some guys I meet by the water.

 

Is this a bad time of year, or should I change my username to "paranoidskunk?"

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has been given to you by Brother Learner. Learn how to catch fish at one spot before you decide to go elsewhere .

 

Each place you will fish will have a learning curve to it. Fish will hold at that spot, buit you will need to learn when and what method works the best.

 

Patients and more patiens are the key words to learning a new spot along with not getting stuck into using just one method, night, day, tidal changes, ect. Experiment and record findings in a log, check with others that you may find fishing the same location and do a little brain washing.Compare the differences and adjust. If you remain persistant and patient succes will prevale.

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Don't listen to that mean man behind the curtain! 40.gif

 

-bd

 

View Postquit the stupid sport and give me all your gear!biggrin.gif

 

 

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agreed with the guys above me. pick a spot and fish it at every phase of the tide, day and night, spring through fall, and just keep a log of what works under what conditions. ie: what plug with what tide phase with what moon phase with what wind direction and speed at what time of year and time of day

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Heya. I have skunked so far this year as well. I know its insanely frustrating but hang in there, it'll come. The more I spend throwing my line in water, more I learn about fishing in general. You know what they say, if it was easy, it would be called 'catching' not fishing. And like couple people said, its good to pick a spot and stick with it for awhile. I just started fishing Canal this year(went again Saturday morning with no fish...) and I'm learning a lot about the place. Hang in there.biggrin.gif

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Focus in on one or two spots

 

fish at night

 

focus in on just a few lures and learn to work them well

 

if you just want to catch a fish, bait has a shorter learning curve

 

spend a few bucks in your local b&t and ask for some tips

 

soaking clams is always a good plan for getting a tug on your line

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Thanks for the replies guys and gals, makes me feel better.

 

Although I've been unsuccessful so far, I REALLY find myself enjoying it. What exactly, I'm not sure, as I've got nothing, but something sure is peaceful and kathartic about this!

 

I prefer night fishing. In fact, most of my outings have been from 10pm-6am.

 

Although I'm no fisherman, I am getting better at telling those that are full of it. REALLY getting tired of hearing "fish at high, or two before to two after."

 

After some research I'm concluded this doesn't make much sense, and it makes entirely more sense to know the LOCATION, as some are probably better at low, and some better at high!

 

Funny you should say stick to one spot....my plan was to catch a nice fish, and STAY THERE all year. It's just that I haven't got that one yet! But once I do - I'm staying put. My buddy just let me in on a good spot in Chat that I'll check out tomorrow night.

 

...just took tons of flak from the Mrs. as we didn't get back from the Barnstable county fair in time for me to go hit some high tide action up at Point of Rock...getting more difficult to defend myself for "fishing" when I haven't got one yet! It'll come, and she'll wake up in bed with a 40" striper in my spot.....

 

As soon as I get one, I'm staying put. Would you folks suggest I stick to bay or ocean for a beginner? I find ocean much trickier as strong currents feel like a fish, and there seems to be more seaweed as well, but people say better and larger fish.

 

If anyone needs their car worked on, a computer fixed, french taught to them, the guitar, or perhaps some tasty old government software, and wants to take me out for a night trip....let me know biggrin.gif

 

Thanks again folks, really enjoying this forum and sport so far. It's shameful to raise a family on the Cape and not fish.

 

One question I do have; there are millions of lures. I hear poppers and a ton of other fisherman vernacular that means nothing to me.

 

I got to a B&T, been to nearly all major ones on Cape, and don't get much in terms of which are good starters. Can anyone suggest a lure that is a known value for stripers and blues, and I'll tie that sucker on and fish with nothing but that for months. I'm just afraid I'm using the wrong stuff...using a kastmaster now.

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View Post

 

 

One question I do have; there are millions of lures. I hear poppers and a ton of other fisherman vernacular that means nothing to me.

 

 

I got to a B&T, been to nearly all major ones on Cape, and don't get much in terms of which are good starters. Can anyone suggest a lure that is a known value for stripers and blues, and I'll tie that sucker on and fish with nothing but that for months. I'm just afraid I'm using the wrong stuff...using a kastmaster now.

 

bait is going to be the easiest to learn with, but it wouldnt hurt to have a few polaris style poppers in case you happen to run into a blitz, mainly during low light conditions, but this time of year, you will probably be more successful with live eels, rigged eels, or eelskin plugs, at night then anything else

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Just returned from a week in Falmouth. Try the south side from first light till an hour after sunup with a SS popper and a small teaser. I had cocktail-size and smaller Blues there with a few short Stripers mixed in 4 of 5 mornings last week. Most of the action was just after sun up, but the earlier start will increase your odds of a bigger fish.

 

All of the above is great info, but it sounds like you need a jump start to get your first... Good luck.

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PJ: I noticed that in the lures you mentioned you didn't include swimming plugs or jigs. I'd just suggest trying a sub-surface swimmer as well, maybe a Yozuri...something like 5 1/4 inch or thereabouts, Rebels the same size or maybe something by Stan Gibbs.....and here's one that ought to bring you some action if there are any fish around. Tie on a 1/4 oz, or 3/8 oz jig direct to mono (no swivels, snaps, etc.) hook a seaworm on the jig so it streams behind on your retrieve...lob cast (so you don't snap the worm off) and slow-retrieve....especially good fished from a jetty or in the rips & currents around an estuary...it's sort of the beach fisherman's tube 'n worm. Be patient, they'll find you

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