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Record marble trout

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Something like this is U-N-B-E-L-I-E-V-A-B-L-E yet it happened.

 

Today, an italian angler on a Slovenian river Soča caught a giant marble trout of 22,5 kg and 120 cm using a streamer and a 0,25 mm tippet:

 

soska009.jpg

 

Until today a marble trout over 15 kg was never caught using rod and reel, the big specimens were usually found dead - like this record specimen of 105 cm and estimated 20 kg found dead during spawning:

 

velik_2.jpg

 

or the slovenian record marble found dead in the May of 1997, measured 125 cm and 25 kg:

 

kopijaodsokanajveja0091qt.jpg

 

 

More on

 

http://www.ribiska-druzina-tolmin.si...opic.php?t=479

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Any trout that big is a marvelous specimen.

 

I confess I've never heard the name "marbled trout." Is this a subspecies of the brown trout?

 

By any name, a marvelous catch. Perhaps we should all add a trip to Slovenia to our wish list.

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Did allittle reading its Salmo marmoratus world record is 55lbs (doubt FF) Does have vermiculations resembling a bit of laker/ brookie characteristics. Biggest problem is Hybridization with brown trout which could lead to extinction...Very few genetically pure populations. For those with no boundries I would place it on your "to catch" list. TC Mark

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Marble trout (Salmo trutta marmoratus) is an endemic subspecies of Salmo trutta, indigenius to mountain rivers that flow into Adriatic sea. Because of the isolation from the other Salmo trutta (brown or sea trout) a sub - species developed. These trout have distinctive marbled pattern and are piscivorius - thus they can grow to enormous dimensions. they cross breed with brown trout which was brought into these waters by man in 19th century. The cross bred offspring is fertile too (thus a sub-species). Marble trout are found in Adriatic orientated rivers of Italy, Slovenia, Croatia and Montenegro. The most famous are Slovenian rivers Soča and Idrijca although marble trout live in a few less known Slovenian rivers too. Artificial breeding is well thought out and genetically pure specimens used for breeding exist. It is said that pure marble trout from big rivers like Soča when they are intensively fed with fish and have enough space for swimming, can very quickly grow to weight of over 20# even in captivity. Luckily such "trophies" are not bred and then released into fishing waters (yet).

 

A big streamer is the correct bait for these trout because it is not uncommon for even a 20" trout to attack and eat a 12" fish.

 

Janez

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View PostSo its similar to a large Tamen. Cool and that one magnificent fish.

 

Sean, you have probably thought of huchen (hucho hucho) - a taimen's cousin that also lives in slovenian waters.

 

 

Huchen:

 

62jRisQwqQZRpTuD.v.jpg

 

 

Marble trout:

 

6lu63YdlDxiKXCWp.v.jpg

 

 

But to some extent you are right - what huchen is in the rivers of Danubian flow that is what the giant marbles are in the rivers that flow into the Adriatic sea - a giant salmonoid predator on top of the foodchain.

 

 

Janez

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A spectacular fish.

 

All the trouts seem to hybridize easily with others, which does have the unfortunate consequence of costing us genetically unique populations.

I don't know if the Sunapee trout of New Hampshire exists any more; nor the golden trout of the high Cascades.

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View PostMarble trout (Salmo trutta marmoratus) is an endemic subspecies of Salmo trutta

 

Janez

 

Not only is it a subspecies of brown trout, but cousin to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

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View PostA spectacular fish.

 

All the trouts seem to hybridize easily with others, which does have the unfortunate consequence of costing us genetically unique populations.

I don't know if the Sunapee trout of New Hampshire exists any more; nor the golden trout of the high Cascades.

 

 

The Sunapees are also referred to as Bluebacks. They are here in Maine in limited locations.

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I am surprised we have not heard more form this area given the huge trout species. I would think intrepid anglers who travel the world for lifetime fishing opportunity would be reporting regularly. Orvis and other international fishing outfitters don't adveritse trips for this fishery? Wonder why?

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