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Bad batch of epoxy...

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I've tied 6 rods this past week. My first foray into rod wrapping.

The first rod, I didn't measure the Rod Smith epoxy well enough and it stayed tacky.

 

I put a second and then third coat over it. All looked good until sat it in the sun. Thfree of the guides have tacky epoxy bleeding through the second and third coats and making tacky balls of ooze redface.gif

 

Should I just strip them down and fix them or can I let them sit a while and coat then a 4thy time cwm31.gif

 

I've noticed I need to applications to get good coverage. Is this normal?

 

The rest of the rods, all look good with 2 coats.

J

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Careful measuring of the two parts and mixing for a full four minutes is very important to a full cure. You want to stir the epoxy rather than whip the stuff. If you whip it, you will have a ton of air in the mix, and also, a load of air bubbles. Once mixed, pour it out on a foil tray for use. I make them by folding a square sheet of foil in half and in half again, then I fold a half inch of the sides over, all the way flat. Flip them back up to where they make walls, and they will make corners all by themselves, IF you do not try to pull them apart. Any bubbles will float to the top and most will pop. The rest can be popped with a quick sweep of the heat of the flame of a small torch. Just be careful to be absolutely sure you do not allow the flame to contact the finish, or it will boil, and you will get these micro bubbles that are extremely hard to get rid of. It can also discolor the finish. One last thing... Heating the finish will shorten the working time considerably, so take this into account when doing this method of bubble release. It is something that works for me, but you may find it does not fit your working style, but then again, it just mightsmile.gif

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I use the syringe method to measure and then stir it up until it goes clear. I then use the tin-foil method, but use a small straw to blow hot air to release the bubbles.

 

Once on the rod, I sit there with my dorky jewelers glasses blowing on the wraps if I see a bubble appear. I then check back every 5-10 minutes and don my dorky glasses again to check for those late blooming bubbles.

 

You are the 1st person I know that used RodSmith epoxy.

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Probably not if you're not being careful in measuring,

 

I use plain old aluminum measuring spoons like you use in the kitchen.

 

I do as the others but I put the two parts on a flat piece of aluminum foil on a piece of flat glass and mix with a spatula. I then, as previous posted, allow it to breath.

 

If you do get a bad cure, you can scrape the questionable stuff off then reapply using properly measured and mixed epoxy.

 

Ditto on the Rodsmith. I've never heard of anyone using it. JMHO C2

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Sorry, bad batch referred to my mixing not the product itself.

I made the bad batch... All mixed batched since then have been fine.

 

My question was not if the epoxy was bad,it was what do I do now... Stripthe guides and do it again? Give it time and another coat????

 

Will the poorly mixed 1st quote continue to ooze or will it set up if given enough time?

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Jason,

I am sorry to say, that I think that the epoxy that is encapsulated under the fully cured stuff will continue to ooze. It has hod more than enough time to catalyze, and it is still oozing?

I am going to say it... Strip it, and re-wrap it

There, I said it!

Feel better now?biggrin.gif

 

You learned one thing...

When messing with epoxy, till you get it down 100%, do not coat a whole mess of rods at onceredface.gif

I did something similar in the beginning.

I had taken 5 days doing my first decorative wrap, a very nice deeply faded Maltese Cross. I did not get my mix right... Twicecwm27.gif

I cut it all off, and did not do the wrap a second timemad.gifbiggrin.gif

 

Careful measuring of the two parts and mixing for a full four minutes is very important to a full cure. You want to stir the epoxy rather than whip the stuff. If you whip it, you will have a ton of air in the mix, and also, a load of air bubbles. Once mixed, pour it out on a foil tray for use. I make them by folding a square sheet of foil in half and in half again, then I fold a half inch of the sides over, all the way flat. Flip them back up to where they make walls, and they will make corners all by themselves, IF you do not try to pull them apart. Any bubbles will float to the top and most will pop. The rest can be popped with a quick sweep of the heat of the flame of a small torch. Just be careful to be absolutely sure you do not allow the flame to contact the finish, or it will boil, and you will get these micro bubbles that are extremely hard to get rid of. It can also discolor the finish. One last thing... Heating the finish will shorten the working time considerably, so take this into account when doing this method of bubble release. It is something that works for me, but you may find it does not fit your working style, but then again, it just might

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I've been using syringes since the second batch. Problem I had was not using them the 1st time...

 

I do pour it out onto a flat surface before applying

 

I'm certain I'll be fine from here on out.

 

But.... I'm going to let the one rod sit and stew for awhile before I strip it.

I'm stubborn... biggrin.gif And patient biggrin.gif

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Throw away the syringes and buy yourself a set of stainless steel measuring spoons, They will give you very accurate measurements on the amounts of epoxy you are using. Then follow the methods the others talk about with the aluminum trays to help alleviate the bubbles.

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I have sprayed alot of two part epoxy paint which is basically two part epoxy with pigment added. My experience is when it doesnt harden and remains tacky it will stay that way and must be stripped off and redone.

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The syringes are great!

Drill a hole in the lid of each bottle of product so the syringe slides in and locks tight just before it bottoms out.

When you want to draw some resin or hardener, turn the bottle upside down, overfill the syringe a tad, tip the bottle over, squeeze out the excess till you have your desired, measured amount, spin the syringe out of the cap, and eject the stuff into your mixing cup.

No hassle, precise measurementwink.gif

Thanks Billy!40.gif

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