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Striper Bling?

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Caught a schoolie yesterday with a tag through it's back. Anyone seen this before? It was pretty well covered in algae but I was able to pull the number off it. It had some other writing on it but it was too hard to scrape everything away to read all of it and I didn't want to keep the fish out of water long enough to do it. Either way looks pretty painful...why not tag the fin?

 

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Those tags are meant to be removed by cutting them at the knot. Take it home and carefully clean it off with sponge. You want to log the fishes length, girth, condition, including any odd markings or lesions, and location. Did I forget anything folks? headscratch.gif

If you use put the tag in the fin, it will unfortunately, tear out rather quickly.

This type of tag does seem to do a lot of damage to the fish, and I much prefer the little spaghetti tags that have a little tiny barbed dart on one end. This type is inserted just beneath the skin and the skin seems to heal around it. It is sort of a mini version of the one we use offshore.

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Some guy was talking about a tagged fsh the other day.He cut of the tag & took it home & there was an address to sent it to along with info. They sent him $125.00 for his efferts! You might have thrown away a few bucks.

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View PostThat appears to be an American Littoral Society tag. You should send in the information. They are based in Sandy Hook, NJ.

 

 

That would be my guess too. I have sent several tags to them off of fish I have caught, and although I have never received cash as mentioned above (lucky SOB)...I have received hats and tee-shirts, etc. American Littoral Society is on Sandy Hook, but I think the mailng address is Highlands.

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I caught a striper with one of these tags put in by AMATEURS! Exactly what I experienced. A huge clump of algae hanging from the tag and a huge gaping infected hole in the stripers tail. I called them and asked why they don't use a single strand spaghetti tag that wouldn't get hung up in the flotsam. American Littoral Society should really rethink their methods. Their methods are counterproductive as to their goal, which is striper conservation. This picture just got me burning again and I wish bad mojo on any amateur "biologist" who is tagging stripers with this method. Spread the word members and stop this barbaric method of tagging.

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Those tags are meant to be removed by cutting them at the knot. Take it home and carefully clean it off with sponge. You want to log the fishes length, girth, condition, including any odd markings or lesions, and location.

 

Yeah, don't forget to mention the infected gaping hole where the tag was. BTW, don't expect cash from the American Littoral Society. I was surprised to hear someone got a hat or shirt from them. Their goal is to "tag" (I call it maim) as many stripers as they can, using volunteers, who strangely enough have to pay for the tagging kits to "help" get migration info from other fishermen who catch them. Again, this is a great site with a lot of members, call the American Littoral Society and ask that they change to single strand spaghetti tags. This method of tagging is barbaric!

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I believe that if the fishermen and women who are volunteering to put these tags in these stripers saw what the effects of their actions were down the road, many of them would stop tagging and demand that the American Littoral Society change their methods of tagging. The problem is with the knot that is tied in the tag. It catches onto all kind of crap while the striper is migrating and feeding and causing significant harm to these fish. To any SOL members who do volunteer for the ALS, this is not an attack on you and I suppose you feel that you are doing a good thing when you see that nice bright, yellow tag swim away. People who catch these tagged fish down the road will have a different opinion, however. I'm willing to bet that the tags are completely covered with a ball of algae just as was described on this post. I wonder how many stripers actually die of infection from this method of tagging in the name of "conservation". This method of tagging is not beneficial to the conservation of striped bass and needs to be changed to the single strand spaghetti tag. Oh yeah, YES I do feel VERY STRONGLY about this. Very strongly INDEED! Glad you noticed.

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View PostThat appears to be an American Littoral Society tag. You should send in the information. They are based in Sandy Hook, NJ.

 

View PostThose tags are meant to be removed by cutting them at the knot. Take it home and carefully clean it off with sponge. You want to log the fishes length, girth, condition, including any odd markings or lesions, and location.

 

Yeah, don't forget to mention the infected gaping hole where the tag was. BTW, don't expect cash from the American Littoral Society. I was surprised to hear someone got a hat or shirt from them. Their goal is to "tag" (I call it maim) as many stripers as they can, using volunteers, who strangely enough have to pay for the tagging kits to "help" get migration info from other fishermen who catch them. Again, this is a great site with a lot of members, call the American Littoral Society and ask that they change to single strand spaghetti tags. This method of tagging is barbaric!

 

I am glad someone mentioned where these tags are supposed to be called in to, and who we should be speaking with to get the style of tag changed.

Is there any way we, the people of SOL might make a petition to ask that ALS switch to the single strand spaghetti tag? a 20,000+ signature request sure would go a long way towards helping the striper.smile.gif

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I just sent an e mail to them with a copy of that photo. I'll let everyone knows what their reply is.

I caught a few tagged fish years ago but they were the barbed tags. Toof measurements and clipped of the tag and sent it in. It wasn't the Litorial Society, I think it was NJ fish and wildlife. Sent me a Cetificate with the original tagging info and a hat. Pretty cool.

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View PostI caught a striper with one of these tags put in by AMATEURS! Exactly what I experienced. A huge clump of algae hanging from the tag and a huge gaping infected hole in the stripers tail. I called them and asked why they don't use a single strand spaghetti tag that wouldn't get hung up in the flotsam. American Littoral Society should really rethink their methods. Their methods are counterproductive as to their goal, which is striper conservation. This picture just got me burning again and I wish bad mojo on any amateur "biologist" who is tagging stripers with this method. Spread the word members and stop this barbaric method of tagging.

 

 

I don't see any gaping hole that is infected...it's just a puncture wound an it heals...the fish looks good and its feeding...those tags work fine...the fish is not in pain.

 

I would still rather see the kind of tags that don't put large holes in fish becasue even when you do remove the tag the fish is scarred an its obvious.

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Below is an excerpt of the results of some of the research that is carried out by The American Littoral Society.

This, along with protecting public access to the coast (more often than not for fisherman), restoring impacted marine and estuarine environments, fighting to preserve uplands that are critical to the health of estuaries that in-turn shelter and feed developing game fishes, educating the public(including giving the opportunity to enjoy and study the wonders of our coastal environment to hundreds of underpriviledged urban children - who probably were afforded the first opportunity in thier lives to go fishing), is just a small fraction of the work that they have been conducting since 1963.

 

Do not be swayed by the rantings of ignorance - see for yourself.

http://www.littoralsociety.org/Default.aspx

 

Abstract--Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) were tagged and released in Atlantic coastal areas between Massachusetts and Florida from 1963 through 2003 as part of a National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) project and a volunteer program sponsored by the American Littoral Society (ALS). A total of 15,699 bluefish were tagged by NMFS and 20,398 by ALS volunteers and 4.3% (1075 NMFS tags and 464 ALS tags) were recaptured and reported. Time-at-large was limited; 65.8% of the recaptured tags were returned within two months of tagging, although nineteen of the returned tags remained at large for two years or more. Tag returns indicated seasonal migrations of fish between the Middle Atlantic Bight and Florida. Three groups of bluefish are proposed for Atlantic coastal waters on the basis of tag return data and are defined by the seasonal occurrence of fish between 30 and 45 cm fork length. The northern group occupied the area from Massachusetts to Delaware between late spring and late fall. Bluefish in the central region between Maryland and North Carolina represented a combination of seasonal transient and resident fish, as did the southern group in Florida. Mixing occurs among all three groups; and larger fish (>45 cm) spend winters in offshore areas. Estimates of von Bertalanffy growth parameters from tagging data were comparable to scale-based estimates. Swimming speeds between point of release and recapture averaged 2.6 km per day, and seasonal spikes greater than 5 km per day corresponded with periods of migration in spring and autumn.

Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is a pelagic species with a worldwide distribution in temperate and subtropical oceans. In the United States, bluefish are found along the Atlantic coast from southern Florida to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and occasionally as far north as Nova Scotia (Collette and Klein-MacPhee, 2002). The broad-scale seasonal movements of bluefish are known within the commercial and recreational fishing communities (Hersey, 1987), but details of the migratory pattern remain poorly documented in the scientific literature. Tagging studies provide the most direct evidence of seasonal movements, but the only published account for the Atlantic coast stock is a study in Long Island Sound by Lund and Maltezos (1970). Wilk (1977) provided a description of bluefish migration that remains the accepted standard and which was based on seasonal distribution of commercial and recreational catches, as well as on unpublished results of a tagging project conducted during the 1960s by David Deuel and colleagues at the NMFS James. J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory (formerly known as the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratory). The proposed migration involved a north-south coastal movement between New York-New Jersey offshore waters and southeastern Florida offshore waters during the fall and a return spring migration along the same route. Larger fish (i.e. greater than three pounds) were believed to follow a more offshore pathway.

The identification of distinct bluefish stocks contributing to this migratory group has been the subject of multiple investigations. The racial composition of bluefish on the Atlantic coast was investigated by Lund (1961) who concluded, primarily from differences in the number of gill rakers of small bluefish, that six races existed along the coast. Lassiter (1962) found differences in first year growth on scales, which indicated that two groups of fish inhabited North Carolina waters. Returned tags from bluefish tagged in the Long Island area (Lund and Maltezos, 1970) also indicated two distinct stocks, although not necessarily the same groups as defined by Lassiter (1962). More recently, some scientists have concluded that either two distinct spawning groups exist (Norcross et al., 1974; Kendall and Walford, 1979) or one stock with two distinct survival periods (Hare and Cowen, 1993; Smith et al., 1994). Others, probing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (Graves et al., 1993), have concluded that Atlantic coast bluefish constitute a single population. A discriminant function analysis of morphometric data has corroborated the one stock hypothesis despite evidence of phenotypically plastic characteristics (Austin et al., 1999).

Mark-recapture experiments provide an empirical method for evaluating both migratory behavior and stock composition. In 1962, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) initiated a study of the migratory patterns of bluefish to obtain information on the population structure of the Atlantic coast stock; this coastwide tagging program continued until 1967. The American Littoral Society (ALS) also coordinates an annual tagging program by private citizens that has resulted in 20 years of tag releases for a variety of species, including bluefish. This combined tag-recapture information constitutes the largest known tagging database for this species. The goal of our study was to investigate the migratory behavior of bluefish along the Atlantic coast by using the results of these previously unpublished tagging studies and to examine the single stock hypothesis in context of tag recovery information.

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Do not be swayed by the rantings of ignorance - see for yourself.

 

http://www.littoralsociety.org/Default.aspx

 

 

The rantings of ignorance?

 

The photo in the first post of this thread shows the tag in the wrong place on that fish.

 

This type of tag is supposed to be placed near the tail of the fish (but not too close, or you will cut other vital structures) not by cutting a huge incision through the thickest part of the body. This is where a single strand "dart" style tag removes a lot of room for accidental injury and interpretation for installation.

 

If you were going to install a radio transmitter on a loggerhead turtle, would you bolt through the edge of the shell, use an adhesive, or use 4" lag bolts in the middle of the turtles back?cwm15.gifcwm40.gif Hey, I know! Let's scrub a spot on the shell, dry it off, and use a time release adhesivewink.gif

 

Yep, no doubt, we are all just ranting ignoranttongue.gif

 

Shame on you sir!cwm13.gif

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