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Flyfishing for carp

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I have gleened some of the articles on Google, and did a search here but did not find a lot of info.

 

I still fairly new just came up on a year on FF. I know some people target carp on the fly and I have been site casting to carp in a 2-3 acre lake at work during lunch. No takers yet. Lake is fairly shallow but I have only been using floating line and I believe my leader is sinking enough to get into the strike zone. What patterns or types of fly's do people use for carp fishing? So far I have tried mostly nymps bu some wet fly's as well.

 

Currently the carp are spawning and have been thrashing around in the shallows for the last 10 days. Not sure if they are still feeding during this time or not but I have even tried to get them to strike out of aggreession with no luck.

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I have had a lot of luck with carp on the fly this year. I don't the choice of fly is the most important thing, though. But if a fly suggestion is what you want, I use a small (size 6 hook) wooly bugger, mostly yellow or chartreuse, with bead chain eyes.

 

PM me and I can send you a lengthy e-mail I wrote to a friend looking for carp advice. I can also point you to some videos I shot showing feeding carp.

 

I personally think the key is identifying which carp to cast to, and which ones to ignore!

 

Andrew

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As a general rule spawning carp do not like to eat...

As far as patterns - go with a rusty colored clouser swimming nymph, or a

crayfish pattern (same color). If thier eating vegitation off the trees, match whatever seeds are falling... or berries. A floating line is ok... just weight your flies accordingly... If they're tailing, go deep. If they're clooping (cruising the surface) they may not eat but if they do a streamer pattern mighhhht work. Stealth is the key... carp have extremely keen senses.

Good luck!

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Carp can be very canny critters. Our carp will occasionally hit very big Pike flies maybe through aggression, but using flies normally is not very productive. I would suggest you try floating dog biscuits which can be made to fashion onto a suitable hook. Try feeding dog biscuits and get the carp really going on them before you make your cast. It's very exciting watching that big moth come up and suck in the biscuit. Evening is the best time when the light is falling and the carp more easily fooled. I would grow a white beard before I could catch carp on std nymph patterns over here. If using real bait offends you, it is possible to buy artificial bread and use that instead. Carp love floating crust. Slow slow strike required.

 

Mike

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Now this is a post I can relate to...

 

I love to fish for carp and have been doing so for about 4 years now and have had many good days and many more not os good days on the water. I like small patterns for carp I will rarely fish anything larger than a #6 nymph hook and have been known to go as far as #16 dry fly hooks. Try anything that looks buggy (nymphs, tiny craws, buggers, all subsurface) When they are eating mulberries I like to use a small spun deer hair mulberry (purple mixed with a touch of red) on a size 10 or 8 wide gap nymph hook. When they move off of those I like to go to #14 and #16 cotton wood seed fluffs (single white or cream cdc feather palmered up the hook shank). Most of the time though I will be looking for "mudding" fish (fish with their nose down, tail up digging in the mud) and will throw smalll craws and some generic nymph stuff at them. My Favorite fly for carp is the head stand and I made a step-by video and put it on you-tube. I hope it's not a vilolation of site rules and if so please let me know and I will refrain in the future but here is a link to my video if you want to check it out.

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/fliesand.../0/Upxw7QgYN-Q

 

Steve

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Carp on the fly can be a blast. Its funny because I just stopped by my carp spot today after work. Caught 1 15 inch carp. I usually use a 5/6 wt but I have been using my 4 wt and it is much more interesting. FORTUNATELY there are 2 mulberries trees that hang over the water and they love the mulberry fly. I have caught them on san juan worms and small nymphs but if there are mullberries that is your best bet. I will attatch some photos. Look in the carps mouth and you will see the fly.

 

Carp remind me of bone fish, If you cast whithin a foot of them you spook them. If you cast 4 feet in front of them your fly might sink too deep and the take will be harder to see. I find that 2 1/2 feet is the perfect distance when sight casting. Also try to cast slightly to the side of the fish. This way you will see it turn and you can set the hook when you feel that he has taken the fly. Keep us posted on your success. The first few pictures are from a few weeks ago. Disreguard the dates. Every time I pull the memorie card to upload the pictures it resets to 2005.

525

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525

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Caught a number of carp on the fly in Lake Erie wading shallow, clear flats in the spring/early summer. Small woolly buggers stripped just on the bottom work great. The bite definitely slows once they start spawning, but there should be a hungry one or two around....

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I have not done much flyfishing in a couple of years,but I used to catch a few carp in a trout stream I frequented.I always drifted large stonefly nymphs,or a #6 Rabbit hair Mudler(a mudler minnow tied with coarse rabit fur loop dubbed and combed out and shaped like a mudler head )right under thier noses in the current.Really fun to get a 25 pounder on a 5 weight with 4x tippet in fast water!

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My best luck has been with a dark bodied (black or dark green with sparkle) wooly bugger type flies either on a #6 or #8 hook.

 

I find carp very spooky in shallow water requiring a quiet presentation. I try to drop it within a foot of their head, let it sink to eye level and give a twitch or two.

 

This year, water clarity has been a big issue and I have been disappointed. Only two fish so far.

 

Lately the fish have been spawning and I don't even see too many fish feeding. When you cast look for fish that are tailing, muddling on the bottom, or look for a stream of bubbles.

 

The video of tying the "head stand" fly was great. Thanks.

 

Good Luck,

 

Bill

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poor mans bone fish.. iv been trying for a while to hook up on one. i have thrown flies at them with my spinning rod and caught alot, but never on a fly rod....was tempted to throw bait on with my fly rod, JUST KIDDING

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If you can get close enough to get a cast out to the carp I would try a San Juan Worm on a dead drift. Down over here the carp fishing just got killed off! This upsets me more than I care to talk about. Where I live the carp used to live along the shore line and they where big. The Coy Herpes got the better of them and hundreds died off within the last couple of months. We had them over 40 lbs right on the surface and no one fished for them. I am an ex salty dog that fished for nothing but big fish and I bought my license just for the carp fishing. I fish at what most will be called the Colorado River. Which upstream and down stream is damned making Lake Havasu("Havasu= Blue"). Another fly which works well over here is called a cottonwood fly. There are plants(shrubs)which grows wild along the river and this plant grows a white with yellow center seed which resembles a egg fly in appearence. I tie mine with yellow thread and white dubbing. This is what I mainly use because of the cottonwood plant I have growing in my back yard. I can keep an eye on its developement. These little buds break off by being sweepted("water hitting the plant and dislodging the seeds"). We also have stripers which I will go after in the fall and early winter, other wise they are too small the rest of the year.

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Some darn interesting posts here.

 

I have no experience with carp. The latest Orvis mailing has an article about fishing for carp (OK, it's really a puff piece about the rod used, but let's not carp about that) that's mildly interesting and reiterates a couple of points made by previous posters in this thread: the need for accurate casting with small flies, the skittishness of the fish, etc.

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