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Metal fishing thread

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Big Krokodiles, or any other spoon, work fine in salt, but they will plane up when fished across a rip or other strong current. Unless the fish are on top they'd be a second choice. Since most fish, most of the time, are hugging the bottom to exploit breaks in the current flow, you'd be better off with a diamond (they work in the surf) or other heavily keeled tin.

 

For fun, I have some Tady 77s (five ounces) coming in from Chark. They'll have trebles and it'll take to experimenting to get them to do well with single hooks, but the experiment will be fun.

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View PostCan a spoon type metal like a 2.25 oz Crocadile work properly in a fast moving rip like a inlet outflow and how shallow can it run on a slow retrieve? I have a spot of the end of an inlet jetty that requires a very long cast on the dropping tide. The reef out there can be very shallow on the bottom half of the tide and it needs to stay shallow (3-4 ft) to not get hung up.

 

View PostBig Krokodiles, or any other spoon, work fine in salt, but they will plane up when fished across a rip or other strong current. Unless the fish are on top they'd be a second choice. Since most fish, most of the time, are hugging the bottom to exploit breaks in the current flow, you'd be better off with a diamond (they work in the surf) or other heavily keeled tin.

 

 

For fun, I have some Tady 77s (five ounces) coming in from Chark. They'll have trebles and it'll take to experimenting to get them to do well with single hooks, but the experiment will be fun.

 

+1

 

 

Anything that is long and flat will plane up like Brian said in a current. When all you have are those long/flat metals...cast out and let it sink, do nothing till you think you're at the bottom or close to it. The retrieve + current will get these metals very high in the water which could be good or bad... Metals like Deadly dicks and hopkins and hopkins shorties PB40's PJ nautilus, bufferfish..etc.....and so on... diamond jigs might be better suited for current than anything flat. Diamond jigs work without the tube too and will get better distance while still replicating the smaller baitfish like anchovies rainfish spearing and so on.

 

 

Just get a dressed treble, bare treble or a single siwash hook on an Ava to replace the tube if you need more distance. Like bucktails, adjust the weight as necessary. Flat calm surf, 007, 117. moderate to heavy surf usually requires the 027 and up.

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View PostCan a spoon type metal like a 2.25 oz Crocadile work properly in a fast moving rip like a inlet outflow and how shallow can it run on a slow retrieve? I have a spot of the end of an inlet jetty that requires a very long cast on the dropping tide. The reef out there can be very shallow on the bottom half of the tide and it needs to stay shallow (3-4 ft) to not get hung up.

 

 

The 2.25 oz Kroc, in calm water, will run about 5'-8' deep with a retrieve speed around 3' per second ( about 1 full turn of the reel each second). It's harder to make it run less than 4'-5' deep on a long cast, but I often do just that! You need to start the retrieve before splashdown, with the rod tip high. (Thicker line helps too). Suprisingly, the 3.25 oz Kroc is a bit better for running slow and shallow. Both cast well out to at least 80 yds. Both sizes are quite stable in fast current and both sizes catch bass. The rip currents could help the Krocs stay up higher in the water column, so they might be just right for the conditions! They were my best-producing bass lures this year, often catching when they wouldn't hit anything else except live baitfish!

 

A better choice in the situation you've described than the brass-based Krocs might be the 2 oz or 3 oz stainless steel Original Gator spoons. SS has about 90% of the density of brass, so the Gators should run significantly more shallow than the Krocs at the same retrieve speed. I expect they would be another good tool for working your spot! However, I would also expect them to be somewhat less stable in fast current, due to their greater surface areas relative to their masses.

 

A key to fishing metals is to find the lure's point of mechanical resonance, that speed where the lure has the most action relative to the rate of retrieve. At that point, the lure's combined forward motion and side-to-side wobbling motion will sweep out the maximum area per second, which will result in the greatest amount of lift and action relative to the retrieve speed. This is the operating point that I've found is most appealing to fish, that point of maximum action and bouyancy with the slowest practical forward motion. Much like pencil poppers!

 

The significant speed when fishing any metal is the lure's speed relative to the water around it. That is what will determine the specific retrieve speed that will put the metal near its point of mechanical resonance. You need to feel for this operating point by slightly varying the retrieve speed and feeling when the metal generates the most resistance relative to the retrieve speed. It requires practice on every cast to find the metal's best operating point and to stay in that narrow range through the varying currents.

 

I heart.gif striper fishing with spoons and tins! smile.gif

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Alot of great info here as was already mentioned by several of you. I mostly fish the sandy beaches of southern NJ and having a wide array of wood, plastics, rubber artificials.....i almost exclusively end up predominately using metals, tins !! It seems like the wave action and terrain that is offered down here is well suited for metals. Not to mention the ease of carrying a wide array of shapes and sizes for the amount of beach walking and tossing helps out the arms and shoulders for hours and hours....

 

Question....Does anyone else have and experience the same sandy beach outlay ? What kind of metals, tins do you use and for what species and situations ? Some of my best presentations in additons to feathers and bucktails dressings are the single trailer hooks with a wide variety of rubber....different colors of curly tails, small Fin-S, worms.....just so much that can be attahced to a metal/tin-----not to mention a GREAT "truck driver" for the teaser application. Anybody else have the same experiences ? Please, can you tell me some of your successful catches with them ?

 

Thanks again for what is a great informational piece that all of us can and are using.......

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Expanding my metal arsinal, I caught my first fish (A KEEPER TOO) on a DD with a feathered single hook.

 

Lots of small thin bait around.

 

Casts very well with a nice wiggle.

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View PostExpanding my metal arsinal, I caught my first fish (A KEEPER TOO) on a DD with a feathered single hook.

 

 

Lots of small thin bait around.

 

 

Casts very well with a nice wiggle.

 

PJ Pojee has that same tight wiggle.

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Bump

 

I have had success on kast masters and deadly dicks.Cast them out as far as you can and give a nice slow retrieve.But I like to let it sink to the bottom and let it sink for a second.Then give is a hard yank.I got a ton of fish doing this in the past years.i like to dress em with one of my single side wash hooks I tied up my self.I like to jig a crippled hering with a teazer tied on to my swivel that connects my mail line to my clip.

 

tight lines

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