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National Saltwater Angler Registry

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From the New York Times online today:

 

 

EDITORIAL

 

 

A Fishermen's Phone Book

 

Published: June 28, 2009

 

 

Your mother was wrong: There are not, as far as we can tell, plenty of fish in the sea. At least not at the levels needed to sustain commercial and recreational fisheries of certain species. But how many fish are there, anyway? And how is fishing affecting their numbers? A new National Saltwater Angler Registry aims to help answer those questions.

 

Come January, saltwater sport fishermen will be required to give the National Marine Fisheries Service their name, address and phone number so they can be interviewed. The registry will replace a creaky system that relies on, among other things, random-digit phone surveys, with researchers asking whoever answers whether anyone there fished and what was caught.

 

Signing up is mandatory and free until 2011, and $15 to $25 after that. You're exempt if your state already has a saltwater fishing license program that collects the pertinent data. In New York, a new license becomes mandatory in October. New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Maine have not yet gotten with the program.

 

Saltwater licenses are old hat on the West Coast and in the gulf states. Although most fishermen here in the Northeast recognize the need for rules and responsible behavior to protect a threatened resource, many are also reluctant to start paying for something that's been free forever. And there are, of course, those who defend as God-given their right to "harvest" a crop they did nothing to sow. New York's license and fees ($10 a year for residents; $150 for a lifetime) will take some getting used to, but they are reasonable and necessary.

 

We're siding with this guy, who recently posted on a popular Internet fishing discussion group: "I think making people pay for a license invests them in the process, and perhaps will make folks begin to think before deciding to fill up a bucket with schoolie stripers" - that is, undersized, illegal striped bass - "or short fluke because 'I only fish once or twice a year.' "

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View PostFrom the New York Times online today:

 

 

EDITORIAL

A Fishermen's Phone Book

 

Published: June 28, 2009

Your mother was wrong: There are not, as far as we can tell, plenty of fish in the sea. At least not at the levels needed to sustain commercial and recreational fisheries of certain species. But how many fish are there, anyway? And how is fishing affecting their numbers? A new National Saltwater Angler Registry aims to help answer those questions.

 

Come January, saltwater sport fishermen will be required to give the National Marine Fisheries Service their name, address and phone number so they can be interviewed. The registry will replace a creaky system that relies on, among other things, random-digit phone surveys, with researchers asking whoever answers whether anyone there fished and what was caught.

 

Signing up is mandatory and free until 2011, and $15 to $25 after that. You're exempt if your state already has a saltwater fishing license program that collects the pertinent data. In New York, a new license becomes mandatory in October. New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Maine have not yet gotten with the program.

 

Saltwater licenses are old hat on the West Coast and in the gulf states. Although most fishermen here in the Northeast recognize the need for rules and responsible behavior to protect a threatened resource, many are also reluctant to start paying for something that's been free forever. And there are, of course, those who defend as God-given their right to "harvest" a crop they did nothing to sow.As opposed to politicians stuffing their pockets with monies for something they did not pay into either? New York's license and fees ($10 a year for residents; $150 for a lifetime) will take some getting used to, but they are reasonable and necessary.Just wait... Once we are "in the system" and licensed, we will be regulated to death so there will be more for the commercial interests that have lobbyists paying the politicos to screw us. I have NO problem with a FAIR system, but I can assure you it will be anything but.

 

We're siding with this guy, who recently posted on a popular Internet fishing discussion group: "I think making people pay for a license invests them in the process, and perhaps will make folks begin to think before deciding to fill up a bucket with schoolie stripers" - that is, undersized, illegal striped bass - "or short fluke because 'I only fish once or twice a year.' "

 

Give it 5-6 years... Mark my words, the axe is coming, and it is going to get uglyfrown.gif

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View PostFrom the New York Times online today:

 

 

EDITORIAL

A Fishermen's Phone Book

 

Published: June 28, 2009

Your mother was wrong: There are not, as far as we can tell, plenty of fish in the sea. At least not at the levels needed to sustain commercial and recreational fisheries of certain species. But how many fish are there, anyway? And how is fishing affecting their numbers? A new National Saltwater Angler Registry aims to help answer those questions.

 

Come January, saltwater sport fishermen will be required to give the National Marine Fisheries Service their name, address and phone number so they can be interviewed. The registry will replace a creaky system that relies on, among other things, random-digit phone surveys, with researchers asking whoever answers whether anyone there fished and what was caught.

 

Signing up is mandatory and free until 2011, and $15 to $25 after that. You're exempt if your state already has a saltwater fishing license program that collects the pertinent data. In New York, a new license becomes mandatory in October. New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Maine have not yet gotten with the program.

 

Saltwater licenses are old hat on the West Coast and in the gulf states. Although most fishermen here in the Northeast recognize the need for rules and responsible behavior to protect a threatened resource, many are also reluctant to start paying for something that's been free forever. And there are, of course, those who defend as God-given their right to "harvest" a crop they did nothing to sow. New York's license and fees ($10 a year for residents; $150 for a lifetime) will take some getting used to, but they are reasonable and necessary.

 

We're siding with this guy, who recently posted on a popular Internet fishing discussion group: "I think making people pay for a license invests them in the process, and perhaps will make folks begin to think before deciding to fill up a bucket with schoolie stripers" - that is, undersized, illegal striped bass - "or short fluke because 'I only fish once or twice a year.' "

 

So the article states that they don't know how many fish are in the sea but not enough to sustain the current fishery. The new registry will replace the creaky current random call system with a new not so random call system. By charging for a license the hope is the poaching will stop because poachers are expected to by licenses thereby becoming invested in the process. Did anyone think that because they are invested they might feel entitled to increase the number of fish they poach? Was this article in support of or against the salt water license?

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Some article - is that really the best they could do?

 

If you pay for a license, you *may* feel more vested and behave more appropriately? How well does that work out for other licenses? Do fewer people drive drunk because of a license?

 

There are a few positives you could work out of the situation - like the monies collected could be used towards conservation effort, hiring additional DEC officers for each state to help enforce the catch limits, or spent on research on the fisheries in question to ensure that they are not in danger of crashing.

 

At the end of the day, we all know what it is - Uncle Sam looking for loans everywhere he can get them, this time from recreational fishermen. This isn't going to help our situation one bit.

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Will I have to go door to door and introduce myself like the Registry that my neighbor is on?

 

"Hello....I just moved in next door. I'm required by law to inform you that I'm a Saltwater Angler."

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View Post"Hello....I just moved in next door. I'm required by law to inform you that I'm a Saltwater Angler."

 

 

 

hmm .. sounds an awful lot like another registry I dont want to be on!! cwm13.gif

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Fish Nerd wrote:

There are a few positives you could work out of the situation - like the monies collected could be used towards conservation effort, hiring additional DEC officers for each state to help enforce the catch limits, or spent on research on the fisheries in question to ensure that they are not in danger of crashing.

 

Unfortunately, the NY saltwater fishing licence does NOT set the money aside for more enforcement or better state management or research. It just shuffles it off to the general fund so the hacks in Albany and Gov. Patterson can shovel it out the window with the billions they already waste.

 

The hesitancy to submit to a saltwater license by so many anglers would be greatly reduced if the money collected went to such a dedicated fund that addressed those issues.

 

Then again, some of the states that actually created a dedicated fund ended up having their politicians raid it for other things down the line. They all SUCK!

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