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BrianBM

Skishing and Sharks

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This is inspired by a thread in the SW Fly Fishing Forum. If curious for some shark-in-surf chatter, stop by and take a look.

 

It seems logical to me that the surfcasters who are most likely to meet sharks in the wash are the guys who skish at Montauk. They swim out to rocks, often with live eels; they make nice splashy noises; they may smell of fish, or have one, when they go home. I've never heard of a skisher meeting a shark, but I'll bet it's happened.

 

Meeting sharks while wading or skishing is the topic. Who has a story.

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There is no doubt that anybody who spends a lot of time in the water has had sharks very close to them. They are probably just not aware of it being were not usually on they're menu lol.

 

All I know is I've been surfing since I was about 10 or 11 and have surfed all over here, east coast, Cailfornia, Carribean,etc. Spend a couple years in Hawaii and I have only seen a shark once. I have surfed one of the most shark invested loactions in all of Hawaii numerous times and never seen one. But There is no doubt in my mind that they were there plenty of times if not nearly every time. The bottom line is a shark attacking a human is an extremely rare occrurance and statistically you have a much higher shot at getting hit by lightning.

 

 

I remeber talking about this recently with Blasko and I think he mentioned he has not had any shark experiences out there. But maybe him and others will chime in, I too am interested.

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I often thought about that when wading off a few beaches in Alameda Ca. What really caught my attention is the color of my waders "green". The part that had me going where I fished there where a lot of cow nose rays which matched the color of my waders. Fishing in the San Francisco Bay where outside the gate is what is called the red triangle "Great White Shark" territory! They do come into the bay at times to feed on herring and seals. We picked them up with our electronics but have not seen them take a seal inside the bay. the fish on the electronics can also be sturgeon which are in the area also feeding on herring. The places where I used to surf fish was very shallow tops 4' but the stripers used to come in to feed with the incoming tide and the top of the outgoing tide.

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what I would like to know is whats the biggest bass caught while skishing .. doesnt sound so effective to me

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View Postwhat I would like to know is whats the biggest bass caught while skishing .. doesnt sound so effective to me

 

IMO it's not worth it, I tried it on the North Side of Montauk just to get the hang of it and it is such a pain in the ass. It's hard to stay in a good position, you're constantly drifting and it is very hard to get in a good cast and make a proper retrieve. Unless I was certain that there were cow sized bass out of my casting range at a given time and place, I would not try it again.

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ive had an 18# bass.. its fun...thats all there is to it..when a fish pulls you around nothing beats it... i only do it once in a while but its a rush

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View Postwhat I would like to know is whats the biggest bass caught while skishing .. doesnt sound so effective to me

 

I don't think Paul Melnyk would agree with you.cwm13.gifbiggrin.gif

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This is such a "strange" way to fish and when I strange, I do not mean that it is wrong. My feeling is that you have eels in a pouch, so you smell like eels. You are wearing a wet suit and look like a seal. Seals are shark food. Put it all together, you look and smell like shark bait.

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View PostI don't think Paul Melnyk would agree with you.cwm13.gifbiggrin.gif

 

 

IM sure he wouldnt .... I just dont see how its humanly possible to float for so long ....

 

How many known skishers are there.

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View PostIM sure he wouldnt .... I just dont see how its humanly possible to float for so long ....

 

How many known skishers are there.

 

You'd be amazed. I did not think it was popular either but everytime I go to Montauk, there is always someone crawling out of the water at night. Happens everytime I am there...

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I've fished with countless sharks for 5 years in Florida. I waded the flats alone every evening from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m., 6-7 days a week during the hight of the season. I can probably count on my hand how many other "waders" I saw out there during that time. It really took some guts to be alone in that element.

 

These flats were in the gulf, and not like the sunny bonefish flats one would think of a bit south of there. Dark bottom mixed with mud and sand spots, and fully covered in seagrass with water ranging from knee to waist deep. It was LOADED with fish, sharks, stingrays, hermit crabs (they love camping out in your wading boots) etc. Basically you wouldn't "spot" the sharks until they came around your feet. That is unless they crash through chasing other fish, or cruised with their fin on the surface.

 

I experienced some hairy stuff out there cwm31.gif and it was scary to know the only thing between you and the shore is a half a mile of waist deep water. There's no escape and its all in fate's hands.

 

I had numerous sharks from feeding together in a group around me. They pushed up on the flat and massacred schools of jacks and mullet, at times 10-15 yards away,working as a unit. (really scary when the mullet used you as "structure") Some evenings I watched them work the entire flat (about a mile long) basically eye level with me as the sun set. Really incredible. (I had the same experience often with bottle nose dolphin, but like up here, they killed the bite) Its one of those times when you know your experiencing something unique.

 

I never once got bumped (knowingly) or bit. I really think it was because when they came through on the feed I didn't run around splashing crazy. I moved, but took my usual slow and steady steps. I also NEVER shuffled my feet. Shuffling your feet rings the dinner bell, and I'm sure it looks no different to a shark then a fish pushing through the grass. They always had a buffet of snacks out there, and there was plenty of fish to go around for both of us.

 

I seriously have countless stories with everything from big shark encounters, to messing with dolphin (or them messing with me), a near fights with a giant Blue Heron, and getting run over by a manatee. One of these days I need to dig up my fishing journal and post a few.

 

But for now I need to stop internet fishing and get some work donebeatin.gifbeatin.gif

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View PostI just dont see how its humanly possible to float for so long ....

 

 

 

It is not a matter of "human possibility" but rather simple physics. Your wet suit makes you positively bouyant, creating lift greater than you water weight, thus you float.cwm15.gif Please don't take this the wrong way but you have an opinion on everythingtongue.gif

 

As far a sharks, I'm told there are plenty. I have never seen them, but I skish at night, and would guess they are pretty hard to see, unless they surface nearby.

 

I have been "bumped" and "brushed" by things, but I opted not to turn my light on to seecwm31.gif

 

 

I know they are there.

 

I wear a black suit and fins with a brown top, pretty seal like, yes, but I recall reading several studies about shark attacks and Hi Vis orange survival gear and there was mention of this color being refered to by the CG as "Yum Yum orange" I don't know how true any of that is, but I stick with the black/brown combo.

 

As far as the effectiveness, I have yet to break #40lbs. I have hooked a couple heart breakers, but not landed them. I think you have just as good a shot from the shore, probably better, except under certain conditions.

 

Ususally conditions are what influence my choice to skish, it is not something I do exclusively, but I do enjoy the experience.

 

As far as technique, it does require some getting used to and adjusting of techniques, but I find it alot easier than rock hoping.

 

These are just my experiences, their are plenty who have far more experience than I, as I only have 3 seasons under my belt.

 

Its fun and it is productive, but its just another tool in the box. It certainly has its hazards, such as getting tossed into the rocks in a nasty shore break, boats, fog, beach casters, (been caught twice-redface.gif both times were my own fault as I didn't know there were casters behind me and I moved) and ofcourse sharks.

 

Once you get the hang of it, it is not hard to release blues, or re tie if you break off.

 

If I do keep a fish, which is very occasional, I keep it on a 6' rope. I never keep a bleeder, unless I am going right in.

 

Most drifts last for 25 minutes, but many nights you can simply swim back and repeat the drift over and over. In this case you can spend 3-4 hrs in the water.

 

The worst thing that ever happened was I got sea lice in my wetsuit. Don't ask me how. They were in my suit on my lower back and chewed the crap out of me. I bled the entire 1 1/2 hr drive back from Mtk. It took about four days to heal.

 

Melnyk says the hardest part about skishing is getting in and out. It can be tough on the south side rocks.

 

Personally I think the hardest part is putting up with Melnykbiggrin.gif

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View Post Please don't take this the wrong way but you have an opinion on everythingtongue.gif

 

As far as the effectiveness, I have yet to break #40lbs. I have hooked a couple heart breakers, but not landed them. I think you have just as good a shot from the shore, probably better, except under certain conditions.

 

 

 

 

Wrong way not taken smile.gif ... Yes, I have an opinion on everything but never afraid to learn and change it. Expessing my opinions have been food for learning from those that correct me.

 

See, I just learned that a wetsuite helps you float, never knew that.

 

I guess I wasnt wrong though as you say you have a better shot from shore.

 

TBD

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