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Chief2

Little confidence booster of local B

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Walked into my Local B&T today, walking in on the middle of a conversation. This conversation gave me just a LITTLE more hope for the future of striped bass. Now my stance on C&R is whatever you want to do. If It's legal, I have no place to insist you do anything else. However, I think conservation is smart and should be at least explained by B&T employees.

 

The conversation was the employee explaining to a customer. Novice, or beginner, at that. He was explaining how it is really not good for you to take the larger striped bass(25#+ was the exact terminology) because they are spawning, extremely fertile females that are a LARGE factor in keeping the fish population healthy.

 

Just thought I'd share a nice story.

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View PostThe conversation was the employee explaining to a customer. Novice, or beginner, at that. He was explaining how it is really not good for you to take the larger striped bass(25#+ was the exact terminology) because they are spawning, extremely fertile females that are a LARGE factor in keeping the fish population healthy.

 

 

Just thought I'd share a nice story.

 

That's great news...too bad so many shops reward the heros with photos and now even video - good to hear that there's ONE shop out there trying to educate icon14.gif

 

 

TimS

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Chief, I've never tasted a striped bass, but in Texas bullreds over the slot of 20-28" taste horrible to me. In Texas, you are allowed to keep a total of 2 per year as long as you tag it with a tag affixed to your fishing license. When I release them, I kinda fib and tell people that usually the bigger fish are full of worms. This year, I'll just say that they are spawning, and full of eggs, and if people don't let the bigger ones go, our kid's won't have anything to catch, and I don't have to feel guilty about being untruthful.

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I have a friend (acquaintance) who fishes several times a week in his boat who catches large striped bass regularly bunker chunking and he keeps them (within the limit). He asked me about the larger striped bass being full of PCB's and mercury, and I said yes they are don't eat them to try and stop him from keeping so many.

 

Well, he is still catching and keeping and I asked why, he said he doesn't eat them anymore, now he just gives them all away. Gee what a nice guy he is.

 

I don't understand why people feel compelled to keep fish whether they eat them or not? To release of fish seems so abhorrent to them.They just don't seem to care about the conservation of these fish regardless of what you say.

 

Even worse, another person from the same dock keeps the fish to feed his dog. Saves off the food bill he says. It makes me sick because the guy is a very very wealthy real estate developer.

 

I just don't get it.

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View PostI have a friend (acquaintance) who fishes several times a week in his boat who catches large striped bass regularly bunker chunking and he keeps them (within the limit). He asked me about the larger striped bass being full of PCB's and mercury, and I said yes they are don't eat them to try and stop him from keeping so many.

 

Well, he is still catching and keeping and I asked why, he said he doesn't eat them anymore, now he just gives them all away. Gee what a nice guy he is.

 

I don't understand why people feel compelled to keep fish whether they eat them or not? To release of fish seems so abhorrent to them.They just don't seem to care about the conservation of these fish regardless of what you say.

 

Even worse, another person from the same dock keeps the fish to feed his dog. Saves off the food bill he says. It makes me sick because the guy is a very very wealthy real estate developer.

 

I just don't get it.

 

 

I dont get it either, but as long as he is within the limit, not much else to say. You dont really hear too many people talking about catching and releasing large fluke, do you? I love fishing for striped bass and do keep my share of fish, but I am not wasteful. I just think it is a double standard sometimes when compared to other fish.

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I fully understand the theory and agree with with most of you. Fact of the matter is, if it's within your legal limit...we really have no right to tell people what to do with their fish. Im 100% in agreement with the eat what you catch (hunting and fishing) ethic, but unfortunately if fish and game set's a limit on size, and your within that...who are we to tell you what to do? If there was really a big problem with the breeder's being harvested, dont you think fish and game would inact a slot limit? Just thinking aloud...

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Actually it is NMFAA(i think) that does more about the regulations, pushing for stricter limits/guidelines.

 

I as well keep a FEW fish, maybe 2-3 a year, and never in the breeder category(which isn't hard to do because I have yet to get one). I agree in NOT preaching about C&R because if they are legal, it is fully their right to keep the fish for WHATEVER they want. But just to see a B&T employee explaining why a lot of people release them, and that it is a good idea to help the species, was a welcomed surprise.

 

As to TIM, this is one of the shops promoting photos and videos, but at least this employee is trying to help a little bit. They also have a log-book, and encourage C&R and just writing the info in the book rather than the photo/video.

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I caught my first striper from the shore the other night, fishing in Brooklyn of all places with my 5 year old son. It was barely a keeper (just shy of 30"). My son was excited, I took a quick picture of him with the fish, then I got started to releasing it when he got upset. I explained the conservation end, that we wouldn't want to eat anything from the East River regardless, and that we'd keep the next one. 'But it took you this long to catch the first one, what if we don't get another one' Lucky for him there were too many witnesses... wink.gif

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I think until average Striper fisherman gets educated on how many years it takes for a female fish to reach the forty pound mark approx 16-17 years and 19-20 years to hit the fifty pound mark. And how valuable fish in this size class are to the fishery as far as superior egg production and passing on their superior genetic traits.

 

It is the same lesson learned in the fresh water community with Large Mouth Bass They learned to let the big females go and breed and be caught another day. and if you want some for the table fine harvest the small 12"-14" bass for the table. The same is true with Muskies it is almost all catch and release.

 

In saltwater the Sailfish and Billfish fisherman have wised up and now almost all of the tournaments and recreation fishing for these fish is almost all catch and release.

 

The question is when are we going to learn as fisherman to protect and self regulate and educate are own ranks for the sake of the great fish we all spend so much time and effort pursuing the Striped Bass?

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