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Stripers-Do They Taste Better From Salt Water?.....

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....I'd think that stripers would taste better from salt or brackish water than fresh water, is this true? I live in Tennessee, there's plenty of freshwater stripers to be caught here from 20 to 50 pounds, even larger. This year is the first time I've seriously fished for them, but I have caught them while fishing for other species quite often the last 20 to 25 years. If I'm not mistaken, the state record here may be near 65 pounds or more.

 

To me, stripers don't taste nearly as good as yellow perch, catfish, crappie, bluegill, or even white bass for that matter, but I'm beginning to really love to fish for them. The water temps down here are getting pretty warm now, I'll probably not eat any more stripers until winter or early next spring.

 

What's your opinion, do you like to eat them or not? I usually release at least 95% of what I catch, and if one is going to die, I have friends who'll take them off my hands. I surfed into this website a few weeks ago, there's striped bass fishermen in TN, but the message boards aren't nearly as active as this one, and I've picked up some tips on here already.

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In his classic Encyclopedia of Fish Cookery, A.J. McClane wrote "landlocked popu*la*tions of striped bass ... is in*ferior to a prime fish taken from saltwater." Author McClane wrote prolificly on fishing and on fish cookery.

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Thanks for the reply, Nils.

 

I don't know much about the northeast coast fishing and dining, but is striped bass commonly sold in seafood restaurants up there? I'm a hillbilly and have never ventured any further north than West VA and northern OH.

 

As I mentioned earlier, I'm really enjoying this message board. Seems as though many of the common saltwater striper lures are pretty much the same as here in Dixie. smile.gif They started stocking TN Wildlife Resource Agency lakes with stripers in the 1960's and 1970's, but it took until the late 1980's for some of the locals down here to finally realize it is beneficial. There are still a few diehard local yokels down here that are bass and crappie purists who will sling a muskie or striper up onto the shore to rot, they claim they're ruining our lakes. I don't think so, the bass, crappie, and other popular species are making a big comeback. highfive.gif

 

BTW, I live near the Clinch River, which held the U.S. striper record for a few months during the 1980's. A fellow by the name of Ralph Dallas caught one over 60 lbs. on a snowy day in December while fishing with an 18" skipjack near a fossil fuel plant. Someone in California broke the record in a few weeks or months, and it has been broken several times since. From my home, I can drive over to the Clinch in about 20 minutes.

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in NJ and NY I know that catching striped bass for sale is illegal. Whether it done to a restaurant, or from fisherman to fisherman.

 

I also believe it is illegal to serve striped bass on any table other than a private home in these states.

 

I think there is a fairly strong guideline along most of the Eastern seaboard in regards to this as of late. I have never seen it, but I believe that striper's while not protected, were one of the most saught after fish out there.

 

 

I personally think striper is kind of bland. the meat is VERY white, nice and firm, but flaky. Doesn't fall apart easily, cooks very well, accepts flavors and marinades VERY well. It is a VERY good fish to eat(out of salt at least). I know this because I do not like a whole lot of fish. I'll eat bluefish any time I am forced to keep it(gut-hooked, or party boat where gaffed, etc.) but generally I will ONLY eat Striper, Weakfish, Croaker. Nothing else for me.

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View Postin NJ and NY I know that catching striped bass for sale is illegal. Whether it done to a restaurant, or from fisherman to fisherman.

 

 

I also believe it is illegal to serve striped bass on any table other than a private home in these states.

 

 

I think there is a fairly strong guideline along most of the Eastern seaboard in regards to this as of late. I have never seen it, but I believe that striper's while not protected, were one of the most saught after fish out there.

 

 

I personally think striper is kind of bland. the meat is VERY white, nice and firm, but flaky. Doesn't fall apart easily, cooks very well, accepts flavors and marinades VERY well. It is a VERY good fish to eat(out of salt at least). I know this because I do not like a whole lot of fish. I'll eat bluefish any time I am forced to keep it(gut-hooked, or party boat where gaffed, etc.) but generally I will ONLY eat Striper, Weakfish, Croaker. Nothing else for me.

 

I think that you are pretty close with this, but I am quite sure that it is not illegal to serve striped bass. I am not sure of what the guidelines are, but there is a famous restaurant in NY that has it on the menu. Perhaps a hybrid bass? I have seen it served at restaurants in MA too.

 

 

I do believe you are correct that the sale of it is not legal, but I think this only pertains to certain times of the year.

 

 

I am with you on the striped bass flavor, a bit bland. The texture is what I do not care for, kind of chewy.

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That very likely is hybrid striper. Can't say for sure, but I would guess.

 

As to serving, I don't think it can be served at a restaurant. Like there is a little tiny restaurant attacked to my local B&T and a lot of the local guys know them. One guy brought in a bass fillet, and asked them to cook it for him, and he would pay them for cooking. Someone told them not to do it anymore because it was illegal. Now it was his fish, just being cooked by him. I do not know for sure if it was because you can't bring your own food to coook at any restaurant, or the fish, but I think it was because of the fish. Either that of the guy had no clue.

 

Lastly, if it's chewy, you are cooking it too long. It will be a LITTLE meatier than most fish, but not chewy. Oh and my views on this are limited, as I have never eaten a bass over 12#, so maybe it is tougher on the larger fish.

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I think the saltwater variety tastes much better than the freshy's taste. I think it has to do with forage base and of course the salt. Stripers in fresh water dine on 95% oily baitfish like gizzard shad,threadfin shad and herring and I think that has a big impact on the quality of taste

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Striper is on the menu all over NYC, with no mention of it being any sort of hybrid.

 

I have found that different stripers can taste really different. This may sound crazy, but I think that I would probably rather eat a striper that has been eating crabs and shrimp etc, and taking it easy down deep, than one that has been chasing sand eels and bunker in rips... Right? maybe I am thinking too much, but it seems there is a lot of variation in striper taste.

 

As for landlocked stripes, I dont realy like any freshwater fish, but that prob has more to do with my preference for saltwater in all parts of life, swimming, fishing, looking at, living near, etc.

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View PostStriper is on the menu all over NYC, with no mention of it being any sort of hybrid.

 

I have found that different stripers can taste really different. This may sound crazy, but I think that I would probably rather eat a striper that has been eating crabs and shrimp etc, and taking it easy down deep, than one that has been chasing sand eels and bunker in rips... Right? maybe I am thinking too much, but it seems there is a lot of variation in striper taste.

 

I agree with you on that one. Love the ones that have that lobsterish taste to them. It's always a roll of the dice.

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I was actually just reading McClane's "Game Fish of North America" book the other night, and he makes the point that it's the diet of the fish that makes it good moreso than the water in which it was found.

 

I had one bass last year that was chock-full of bunker. Tasted like ass, to be quite frank.

 

Earlier in the season, before the bunker invasion, when we're deeling with squid and herring and mackerel and crabs and shrimp and other things that human beings might potentially eat? Might well come out better overall.

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it is legal to serve wild striped bass in restaurants in ny as long as they are tagged fish theres always fish in the markets with tags running up the coast like virginia ,del,RI, NY TAGS START IN JULY

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Yes as a rule, most freshly caught salt water fish taste better than fresh water fish to me. Salt water fish seems to have less of the "fishy" taste. It also makes a lot of sense as someone else mentioned, that the strong flavor of fresh water striper may be attributed to their diet of gizzard shad and skipjacks. G. shad and skipjacks are some of the smelliest old fish I have encountered. They make good catfish bait, however.

 

There are maybe three freshwater fish IMHO that can even try to compete with salt water fish, and they must come from cool water: 1)Walleye, 2)Yellow Perch, and 3)Crappie. Maybe it's because I live 12 hours or more from the ocean and don't fish there often.

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