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pmbrac

measured my cast yesterday

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I pull out my nikon range finder yesterday to measure some casts.. With my xra 1322 and emblem 550, 50 lb power pro, I was getting an average of 100 yrds with a few that were 110. My best cast was 115 yrds. all these were with a 3 oz guppy pencil popper.. Im pretty happy with these results.. The easier I cast, the better distance I seemed to get... I thinking if I had better form, I could maybe do better.. Anyone else have this set-up?? What kind of distance is is capable of in the right hands??

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That is about right with 50#. drop down to 30# for more distance if you are only plugging.You can adjust the lure drop from the tip to maybe give you more. You are on the right trac,do not snap cast this set-up. When you feel the rod start to load pull down on the butt with some good power. Just practice your timing and accuracy,the distance will come.

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Didn't mention if spin or conv.

Either way,, it's like golf. Cast to beat yourself, not to compete with others.

For me, I'd be pleased knowing 80 is solid in your test.

How well can you put it where you really want it? 10 ft? 10 inches? That's important too.

 

"The easier I cast the better distance I get...."

Absolutely! I can cast fairly(?) well with my conv.

But I can cast "spot on" about 80% of that distance. Plus, within that 80% I can easily reach further and need to controll the distance.

 

Ironicly, if I go for the distance I reach on the above on purpose, I'm often off target by up to 15 ft. kooky.gif Gotta be a focus thing?

From the beach it may not be an issue when blind casting. But from a boat casting to schools, rocks, drops, rises, it is more important.

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The Emblem Pro the OP mentions is a spinning reel. I have one too; I like it, but it's heavier then ideal.

 

The hundred yard barrier is significant with plugs, a point beyond which your returns of distance, for increased effort, fall off significantly. You might do a Search for High Plains Drifter's posts; he does more with plugs at maxumum range then most of us.

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Yea seems like you are getting close the max you could expect with that lure. Once you have the right equipment and decent form so much depends on the aerodynamics of the lure.

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This is what I think is happening. Now you said your getting less distance when your casting harder. What I think Is happening the rod is loading and reaching full lock, which is fine. But the only part is the rod is not recovering

because of the power put in the cast. I think if you load the rod like if you were swinging at A pitch that was high and outside it will take some of the pressure off of the blank and get that extreme distance that we all want.

Hope this helps.

 

 

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I have three tips for you:

 

1) If you are not using body twisting casts like a pendulum or off-the-ground cast then learn those. Not only do they supply more power but they also line up the fishing line in the correct postion prior to the forward stroke. This is vital when casting plugs. It makes them go dart like without speed scrubbing wobbles or tumbling. It will require practice to groove this in.

 

2) Find the IDEAL weight for your rod. Often, this is a small range within a 1/2 ounce bracket.

 

3) The most effort/power should be placed at the final portion of the forward stroke. If you apply it too early, your rod will load and then relax BEFORE you let the lure loose. It requires constant ACCELERATION to allow the INERTIA of the plug to keep the rod bent. If you accelerate to top speed too early.....the rod is going to relax before your cast is launched.

It helps to try to push forward at the end of the stroke. The casting arc should not be a perfect "C". Instead, it should be sort of a "J" (laying on its front side) with the long leg being the last part of your stroke

 

I hope this helps. It will take many casts with just a few that feel "ahh, just right". The rod will feel "heavy" and fully loaded at the end of the stroke. Gradually learn why that happened and groove it in. - HPD

 

PS - Casts of 150 yards while fishing are possible with your set-up (go with 30# for this) but it requires carefully selected lures and excellent technique.

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Adding on to what HPD said, making your lure fly like a dart is something most of us naturally do when facing stiff wind conditions. I've heard people call it 'punching through the wind.'

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I have three tips for you:

 

3) The most effort/power should be placed at the final portion of the forward stroke. If you apply it too early, your rod will load and then relax BEFORE you let the lure loose. It requires constant ACCELERATION to allow the INERTIA of the plug to keep the rod bent. If you accelerate to top speed too early.....the rod is going to relax before your cast is launched.

It helps to try to push forward at the end of the stroke. The casting arc should not be a perfect "C". Instead, it should be sort of a "J" (laying on its front side) with the long leg being the last part of your stroke

 

Does this look right????

525

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Does this look right????

 

 

Thanks for posting that great photo! I'm going to point out a few things but don't let them strike you as critisism of any sort. You are obviously doing good stuff in that PARTICULAR SITUATION!

 

1) If we are talking about true distance casting then we are also talking about footing. To get them most out of a cast (and particularily using pendulum or other body twisting casts) requires firm footing and a wide stance. Some situations simply do not allow this.

 

2) Please notice how the rod is deeply bent in the lower sections but @ 1/3 of the tip section has practically no bend in it. This means only a portion of the rod is storing energy. Really good distance casting rods have a more power in the butt and the entire rod stores energy without any of it folded over.

I'm not sure if you thought the "J" reference was about the shape of the bend in the rod. It was meant to refer to the the mechanics of the casting stroke.

 

Once again, it looks like you are doing the right thing in the pictured situation! I'm just pointing out what would be more ideal in other situations! I would probably be using that same rod and the same technique if I fished those slippery rocks. I sure as heck wouldn't be using a rod that required me to put a lot of body weight transfer into it! - HPD

 

Here is a photo of my wife with a great distance casting rod (Breakaway Omeaga. Contrast the flex pattern with your rod (which might be more appropiate for limited footing).

 

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