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Most imporant part of your equipment

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I would definitely consider my reels my most important pieces of equipment. I have surf fished for 35 years and while I have purchased many reels during this time, the majority of my fishing is done with my green Penns, Cracks, and Rumers. These reels have withstood the tests of time and are as good as any reels made today. No matter what type of reel you use , constantly take care of it, and it will take care of you.

 

P.S.- For what it's worth, most of the reels that I use do not have a bail.

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Really, I would agree with the first response, that knowledge (and I'll add preparedness) are paramount to success. But I will list a top 5 of of actual tangible pieces of equipement!

 

1. The Hook... size, strength, shape are all important, but I would say sharpness is the number 1 concern. If it ain't sharp you ain't gonna hook up well! This is your first connection to the fish!

 

2. Line... size and application are important. I will include good knowledge and correct usage and tying of knots. Also, try the REEL MAGIC. It works!

 

3. The Reel... I would say this is most important, but more so than type or expense of a reel, I'd say that it must be well maintained. It needs to cast smoothly, fight with proper drag adjustments, hold line, and of course, retrieve line well. Soap, water, reel-oil, and proper storage can go a long way.

 

4. The Rig... be it a lure, bottom rig, hook and sinker set up, etc. you gotta be versatile. They are some that out-produce time after time, but sometimes they don't seem to want that ole standby.

 

5. The Rod... I put this last, because although a quality rod aids in fighting/tiring/landing a fish and saving the angler's strength, I don't think I have ever lost/not caught a fish do to rod failure. If a rod fails me, it's usually because of something I did, ie break it or not store it properly! Have a supply of replacement tips and super glue or hot glue sticks for repairs.

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1. The ability to allow myself to seek knowledge from others who may have more than I do.

 

2. Reels / line - they cannot be separated as they are the team that allows yuo to get the bait out and the fish in.

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View Post1. The ability to allow myself to seek knowledge from others who may have more than I do.

 

2. Reels / line - they cannot be separated as they are the team that allows yuo to get the bait out and the fish in.

 

 

 

Ditto and add sharp hooks and the right bait and hook size for what you want to catch/whats running. Wash down your reel after every use and keep the drag setting loose when storing. Line needs to be changed often.

 

Ask the right folks the right questions, read, apply what you hear and read.

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Stuff like bait and knowledge is not equipment.

 

Thoeretically hooks since hooking the fish is essential. But I don't think its the most common equipment failure.

 

Line with its associated knots is probably the most common piece of equipment that causes failure. You gotta have that right. If not the rest is immaterial.

 

A few years back 5 of us waded out to a bar way out on Cape Point. It took 45 grueling minutes in water waste to chest deep to wade out there.

 

When we got out there it was on! 4 of us caught 23 drum in about 2 hours.

 

The other guy? Well, he hadn't changed his line since the year before. After breaking off 2 fish he was out of rigs. His drag was fine, his line had deteriorated. I had 2 spare rigs and gave him 1 of them which he promptly busted off. He didn't get my last spare so he watched as we continued to catch fish.

 

I could of swore I saw a tear trickle down his cheek.

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1) knots - many hours of testing in the garage, pulling, and tying in the dark... i lost 2-3 LARGE fish this way a year back... not anymore cwm15.gif. I trust them now

2) hooks - sharp and size/shape (personally working on this one to make something better)

3) line/reel/rod - if you cannot cast to reach the fish, or reel them in, or dont tire yourself out in the process, then you are good. Change your line at least 1once a season, starting with new at the beginning.

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Has anyone watched Knot Wars on North American Fishing? They tested the knots on braid, mono and flourocarbon. The winner the first year was the palomar knot. It lost this year but I can't remember the name of the knot. I will visit their site and find out. More later.

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terminal knots are easy, usually a uni works fine for the leader ->swivel on your hook. The running line to leader knot is the fun one, this site has plenty of info, and after trying most of them, the one "I" am most comfortable with and trust is the spider hitch --> slim beauty, illistrated buy plug.

 

The other important knot is the snell, most important part with this knot on the hook is to make them look pretty, lol... we all like pretty snell's and fish dont bite hooks with ugly onesbiggrin.giftongue.gif

525

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View PostChange your line at least 1once a season, starting with new at the beginning.

 

 

I'm doing good to get 24 hours of fishing time with mono. Braid lasts longer. If my line feels the least bit rough I change it. Abrasions GREATLY weaken mono. Nicks are even worse. I've respooled my heavers 3 or 4 times already this season. Maybe that's a little OCD but line is cheap. I burn $30 worth of gas, buy $20 worth of bait to catch a fish the last thing I want is to lose fish because I was too cheap to spend $3.50 on a respool.

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