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Taking the Lords name in vain

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Ok, I admit it, I have no clue what that means. One of many religious things I can't quite wrap my head around. (Though I have tried on numerous occasions to understand the religious viewpoint.)

 

I've heard the phrase many times, "Don't take the Lords name in vain", but never found anyone who can actually tell me, specifically, what exactly constitutes the action of "taking the lords name in vain".

 

Whenever I ask someone, I just get a blank stare. As if they've never thought about it before. Which leads me to believe that they're just parroting what they've been told, without ever thinking about what it actually means, or how often they themselves do it on a daily basis.

 

For example, I've found that the most religious amongst us are usually the quickest to say "God bless you", when someone sneezes.

 

Is that not a most frivolous use of the Lords name? confused.gif

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The Lord is the most holy . He is above all things. His name is not to be used in common conversation, or freely. Or as a swear type comment. smile.gif

 

And saying "God bless you" is using the Lord's name as intended. One is calling on the Lord to bless someone.

 

Saying, God......, (fill in the rest) is not calling on the Lord in a proper or respectful way. He is King of Kings, and Lord of Lords.

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I agree with Jimmy... "God bless you" is a good phrase asking for blessing not cursing, definitely not the Lord's name in vain. How many times have you heard someone use the name of Jesus Christ in a derogatory sense... some people say His name as a swear word or curse. I think this is using the Lord's name in vain as well...

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View PostThe Lord is the most holy . He is above all things. His name is not to be used in common conversation, or freely. Or as a swear type comment. smile.gif

 

And saying "God bless you" is using the Lord's name as intended. One is calling on the Lord to bless someone.

 

Saying, God......, (fill in the rest) is not calling on the Lord in a proper or respectful way. He is King of Kings, and Lord of Lords.

 

View PostI agree with Jimmy... "God bless you" is a good phrase asking for blessing not cursing, definitely not the Lord's name in vain. How many times have you heard someone use the name of Jesus Christ in a derogatory sense... some people say His name as a swear word or curse. I think this is using the Lord's name in vain as well...

 

So you're really asking for Gods blessing?

 

When someone sneezes...You honestly feel the instantaneous need to ask God to bless them? It's not just a "polite saying"?

 

I'm calling BS. cwm13.gif

 

Someone could be writhing around in pain, vomiting, and coughing up blood...And no one would say any blessings.

 

But I bet you say "bless you" when your dog sneezes.

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View PostSo you're really asking for Gods blessing?

 

It's not just a "polite saying"?

 

I'm calling BS. cwm13.gif

 

It might be just that, a polite saying.... but I really don't think there is anything malicious in the intent of saying "God bless you" or just "Bless you" for that matter. Maybe it is the intentions behind our use of the Lord's name, that could qualify it as being "In vain" or not.

 

I mean you have to admit their is a different between saying "God bless you" when somebody sneezes... Or saying "gosh darn you" when you are pissed off.

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"Bless you" for a sneeze?

 

Please explain the thought behind thinking one needs to be blessed if they sneeze.

 

Are you so foolish as to believe the heart stopped and the devil may have had a chance to get it kooky.gifkooky.gifkooky.gifkooky.gifkooky.gifkooky.gif (the most common explanation I have heard)

 

Foolish utterances and one you'll never hear from me....

 

I sneeze, I say "excuse me".

 

Is a sneeze a type of orgasm? IE nerve stimulation culminating in an involuntary spasm.

 

I like sneezingbiggrin.gif

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I thought it meant invoking god to make something happen that isn't going to happen. Like "god" I wish it wasn't blowing from the east today so I could fish my favorite spot. That was how it was explained to me anyway. It made sense to me. Sort of makes "god" seem "weak" if he can't make it happen.

 

Could be wrong though, this was just an explanation someone gave me.

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View PostSo you're really asking for Gods blessing?

 

When someone sneezes...You honestly feel the instantaneous need to ask God to bless them? It's not just a "polite saying"?

 

I'm calling BS. cwm13.gif

 

Someone could be writhing around in pain, vomiting, and coughing up blood...And no one would say any blessings.

 

But I bet you say "bless you" when your dog sneezes.

 

My friend, you can say whatever you like, but in the realm of things, God bless you still means God bless you.

 

And BTW, God bless you. smile.gif

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I thought it meant that you shouldn't take the Lord's name unless you mean it. Meaning don't say you are a Christian for social reasons or convenience. Only say you are if you truly believe.

 

 

(though since Moses got these rules it transends Christianity)

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I've only heard that 'advice' (or whatever you call it) in terms of adding the word that sounds the same as 'dam' after his name...or when we screw up and the first thing we say is 'Jesus' or 'Jesus Christ'...

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View PostI thought it meant that you shouldn't take the Lord's name unless you mean it. Meaning don't say you are a Christian for social reasons or convenience. Only say you are if you truly believe.

 

 

(though since Moses got these rules it transends Christianity)

 

True, and there are many out there in the Christian community like that. They are called hypocrites.smile.gif

 

 

View PostI've only heard that 'advice' (or whatever you call it) in terms of adding the word that sounds the same as 'dam' after his name...or when we screw up and the first thing we say is 'Jesus' or 'Jesus Christ'...

 

True, God and His name are intended to be used properly. God, not god.smile.gif

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99. Q. What is required in the third commandment?

A. We are not to blaspheme or to abuse the Name of God by cursing,[1] perjury,[2] or unnecessary oaths,[3] nor to share in such horrible sins by being silent bystanders.[4] In short, we must use the holy Name of God only with fear and reverence,[5] so that we may rightly confess Him,[6] call upon Him,[7] and praise Him in all our words and works.[8]

[1] Lev. 24:10-17. [2] Lev. 19:12 [3] Matt. 5:37; James 5:12. [4] Lev. 5:1; Prov. 29:24. [5] Ps. 99:1-5; Is. 45:23; Jer. 4:2. [6] Matt. 10:32, 33; Rom. 10:9, 10. [7] Ps. 50:14, 15; I Tim. 2:8. [8] Rom. 2:24; Col. 3:17; I Tim. 6:1.

 

100. Q. Is the blaspheming of God's Name by swearing and cursing such a grievous sin that God is angry also with those who do not prevent and forbid it as much as they can?

A. Certainly,[1] for no sin is greater or provokes God's wrath more than the blaspheming of His Name. That is why He commanded it to be punished with death.[2]

[1] Lev. 5:1. [2] Lev. 24:16.

 

101. Q. But may we swear an oath by the Name of God in a godly manner?

A. Yes, when the government demands it of its subjects, or when necessity requires it, in order to maintain and promote fidelity and truth, to God's glory and for our neighbour's good. Such oath-taking is based on God's Word[1] and was therefore rightly used by saints in the Old and the New Testament.[2]

[1] Deut. 6:13; 10:20; Jer. 4:1, 2; Heb. 6:16. [2] Gen. 21:24; 31:53; Josh. 9:15; I Sam. 24:22; I Kings 1:29, 30; Rom. 1:9; II Cor. 1:23.

 

102. Q. May we also swear by saints or other creatures?

A. No. A lawful oath is a calling upon God, who alone knows the heart, to bear witness to the truth, and to punish me if I swear falsely.[1] No creature is worthy of such honour.[2]

[1] Rom. 9:1; II Cor. 1:23. [2] Matt. 5:34-37; 23:16-22; James 5:12.

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Generally, the big Ten seem to be simple, straighforward, common sense good suggestions on a decent life. But you gotta admit, that one's a little harsh.

I think it should be down around 14.

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