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Burning off fogging oil

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new boat or new to you boat?

 

if engine is new i would not replace the plugs, if you bought it used replace them and keep old ones for spares.wink.gif

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View Postnew boat or new to you boat?

 

if engine is new i would not replace the plugs, if you bought it used replace them and keep old ones for spares.wink.gif

 

New to me, but I put in fresh plugs midway through last season. Just don't know if burning the fogging oil fouls the plugs enough to worry about.

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I don't any longer after taking them out and always finding them clean. I had used brake cleaning fluid and a toothbrus to clean them but they never looked any cleaner afterwardsredface.gif I don't think that it matters, but I swapped the original plugs when the engine was new to the Iridium tipped plugs - seventh season (543 hours) on the same set of plugs and she still runs as smooth as a sewing machine.

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WayneTJ.

Are those plugs in a 2 stroke or a 4 stroke?

 

I usually burn off the fogging oil, warm up the motor and then replace the plugs. I use the standard OEM plugs on my 2 stroke. I know somw folks who replace plugs several times a year. I guess that you get to know how long plugs last after a while and what you expect them to look like when removed.

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Always keep a "new" spare set handy. (old skool)

If it's running fine,,, why fix that which isn't broke? highfive.gif

 

2 stroke, 4 stroke, 20 stroke. Does it matter? if it ain't broke,....... headscratch.gif

 

Never figured it out. Some folks kill their stuff with kindness.

Like, Treat the motor good,,, change the plugs (why not?).

Then miss something like pulling the plugwire too hard when changing for problems later. Maybe crossthread the new one?,, seagull crapping in the hole... mid change?

Why look for trouble. "'Tain't broke /don't fix." my motto.

Preventive, yes. Buyt there's a line between "preventive" & "why not?"

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Start a routine..change them out and go the season. Winterize and in the spring start it up and burn off the oil,,,now put new ones in and repeat,

 

Foul up the old ones and keep for a spare. New ones cant hurt

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Eh, you can take them out and check them. If you have a 2-stroke(will always be a LITTLE dirtier than 4-stroke) and there is a tan tinged color, they're fine. There's garbage, that's bad. If they look good, but you wand to do something routine, take like a 220 grit sand paper and just skim the electrode. One stroke, very light, it will just give it a niceclean surface. You can do that every year, and swap them every 2.

 

I have never replaced plugs more than once every 2 years.

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View PostAlways keep a "new" spare set handy. (old skool)

If it's running fine,,, why fix that which isn't broke? highfive.gif

 

2 stroke, 4 stroke, 20 stroke. Does it matter? if it ain't broke,....... headscratch.gif

 

Never figured it out. Some folks kill their stuff with kindness.

Like, Treat the motor good,,, change the plugs (why not?).

Then miss something like pulling the plugwire too hard when changing for problems later. Maybe crossthread the new one?,, seagull crapping in the hole... mid change?

Why look for trouble. "'Tain't broke /don't fix." my motto.

Preventive, yes. Buyt there's a line between "preventive" & "why not?"

 

It does mater. Four strokes, especially earlier model, burn a lot less cleaner than 4s or newer 2s. I suppose I could get more than a season out of my plugs but as they get dirtier, thet burn less efficiently resulting in less fuel mileage. More importantly, as they get carbon buildup, they are more prone to pre-ignition and that can hammer an engine to death.

So for the 18 bucks it cost me, it's a cheap maintenance item.

I am also of the "don't fix it if it ain't broke" school but still beleive thatsome things need to be maintained.

Every season when I drain my lower unit, the oil looks brand new but I am still going to replace it.

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Keeler,

I think I can appreciate where you're coming from.

My thoughts, usually when the plugs start acting up you can feel it in the idle, starting, fuel consumption. After fogging / older gas, I'd prefer to wait and see on newer gas and a good cleaning out run.

Changing oils are preventive to my way of thinking. However, changing in the spring is not part of it. I'd change before storage. Oils tend to get acidic / dirty, why let it sit in the engine all winter? And if there should be water in the lower unit? I don't want to wait til the rush in the spring, nor let the water freeze in the gears.

I know more than one person that will fog an engine and add new plugs right away. Theory being, "ready to go in the spring". (each their own I guess)

 

Anyways, I'd still run out the old fuel on old plugs and play it from there. Filters would be looked at after the fuel change too unless a issue arose.

 

Just different ways of doing things I guess. smile.gif

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The new plugs with platinum or irridium cathodes/anodes do not need replacing every season. It can't hurt to do it, but it's not necessary because they don't pit and wear like the "old" style plugs.

 

Look at manufacturers recommendations for cars these days - they say 100K miles before you need to change the spark plugs.

 

Two stroke engines will require regular cleaning, but you don't have to replace them. BTW, it's not recommend to use sand paper on these plugs - in fact, you'll ruin their longevity by removing the special alloy coatings. In fact if you look at an irridium plug, the anode is no bigger than the point of a pencil - one swipe with sandpaper and its just a regular plug - probably worse.

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View PostKeeler,

I think I can appreciate where you're coming from.

My thoughts, usually when the plugs start acting up you can feel it in the idle, starting, fuel consumption. After fogging / older gas, I'd prefer to wait and see on newer gas and a good cleaning out run.

Changing oils are preventive to my way of thinking. However, changing in the spring is not part of it. I'd change before storage. Oils tend to get acidic / dirty, why let it sit in the engine all winter? And if there should be water in the lower unit? I don't want to wait til the rush in the spring, nor let the water freeze in the gears.

I know more than one person that will fog an engine and add new plugs right away. Theory being, "ready to go in the spring". (each their own I guess)

 

Anyways, I'd still run out the old fuel on old plugs and play it from there. Filters would be looked at after the fuel change too unless a issue arose.

 

Just different ways of doing things I guess. smile.gif

 

 

Good catch. I always chage the oil before winter storage for the reasons you mentioned. I was caught up in the spring, start up, change plugs and filters modesmile.gif

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Change em out just to be on the safe side. Depends on how much fogging oil was used and how much is still in there,etc. I would change them out just so I don't have any problems half way through the season. It's not that expensive to buy them. You don't want to get stuck somewhere for something so easy and cheap.

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