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Joe5

Roof Rack Q

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I have a Tarpon 140 and i'm looking for a roof rack for my 2004 Mercury Mountainier. Any suggestions on somthing affordable. Thanks in advance!!!

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If you have factory crossbars you dont need anything but the right straps. If you only have factory rails then you need Yakima lowriders and crossbars, about $160

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View PostIf you have factory crossbars you dont need anything but the right straps. If you only have factory rails then you need Yakima lowriders and crossbars, about $160

 

 

 

Check in the manual that come with your vehicle of the load rating of your factory cross bars. A lot of them will support the weight of a Kayak but have a tendency to sag when you hit bumps and potholes in the road and thus having your kayak rub on the top of your roof. Not a good idea!

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View PostCheck in the manual that come with your vehicle of the load rating of your factory cross bars. A lot of them will support the weight of a Kayak but have a tendency to sag when you hit bumps and potholes in the road and thus having your kayak rub on the top of your roof. Not a good idea!

 

Have not seen that problem in modern cars and suv's and I have strapped thousands of kayaks to factory bars including a 90 pound pro angler to a guys car last week. You dont put the kayak dead center on the bar anyway always over on the passenger side for more eficient strapping technique.

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View PostHave not seen that problem in modern cars and suv's and I have strapped thousands of kayaks to factory bars including a 90 pound pro angler to a guys car last week. You dont put the kayak dead center on the bar anyway always over on the passenger side for more eficient strapping technique.

 

 

Do you use any pads or anything on the factory crossbars?

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View PostDo you use any pads or anything on the factory crossbars?

 

here's a couple suggestions

 

 

instead of buying cross bar pads from one of the big two (Thule/Yakima)

 

 

you can either go to Home Depot or Lowes and in the plumbing dept pick up water pipe insulation - usually comes in 4 ft lengths and 4 per package. They are already slit to fit over copper pipes - just use two of those and some good duct tape - your good to go

 

 

What I may use next week when I'm ready to begin my season is I have 2 or 3 kids swimming pool noodle tubes. They are a larger diameter than the pipe insulation. I'll slit them cause they already have a hollow center - cut em down to my cross bar size desired and again some good tape. I'm good to go.

 

 

The Yakima cross bar pads are $30 or more - use your savings for necessities

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Your factory bars will be fine. Use jack's foam ideas. Get 2 straps (HD) with cam locks, not ratcheting and no hooks. Place the kayak deck side down. Take a strap, go over the hull, under the cross bar, back over the hull and under the crossbar again. Cinch it down tight. Do it again at the other crossbar. You're good to go. If you want to be extra sure, tie a line from the bow to some point on the front of you truck.

 

A kayak without gear won't weigh more than 70 lbs. If your cross bars can't handle 35 lbs each, get a new car.

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No foam, never, it nots needed and makes loading the kayak more difficult.

I dont understand the use of foam pads. What do they do? Why do people put them on? The kayak will not scratch the bars and the bars will not scratch the kayak.

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View PostNo foam, never, it nots needed and makes loading the kayak more difficult.

 

I dont understand the use of foam pads. What do they do? Why do people put them on? The kayak will not scratch the bars and the bars will not scratch the kayak.

 

I'll tell ya Barrell, you're very interesting to hear from on this forum (or any forum), what with you being in the business plus your experience(s)

 

 

although I agree with you they aren't necessary

 

 

don't ya think that they do provide some cushion that further holds tight the yak on the crossbars?

 

 

I mean a hard item against a soft item it more snug than a hard item on a hard item - right?

 

 

but what you say is exactly why I would never buy crossbar pads

 

 

waste of money

 

 

unless someone has to have Thule or Yakima advertising on the roof of their car

 

 

but I mean even when I transport a piece of furniture - I place an old bed quilt on top of the roof before loading the furniture - right ????

 

confused.gif

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I'm with Barrell on this one. The foam pads make it more difficult to slide the kayak on the cross bars and you're not gonna scratch either the kayak of the bars. With a good cam strap you can snug it down pretty tight where the foam will compress under tension. There is nothing wrong with using pads if you have them, just not necessary to purchase them if you don't already have them.

 

Tony

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View PostI'll tell ya Barrell, you're very interesting to hear from on this forum (or any forum), what with you being in the business plus your experience(s)

 

although I agree with you they aren't necessary

 

don't ya think that they do provide some cushion that further holds tight the yak on the crossbars?

 

I mean a hard item against a soft item it more snug than a hard item on a hard item - right?

 

but what you say is exactly why I would never buy crossbar pads

 

waste of money

 

unless someone has to have Thule or Yakima advertising on the roof of their car

 

but I mean even when I transport a piece of furniture - I place an old bed quilt on top of the roof before loading the furniture - right ????

confused.gif

 

Hat, If you strap correctly (and ive seen some crazy strapping methods pull up in my driveway) The yak cant move up, forward, left,or right. With two 15 foot cheap tie downs I can first lock the yak down, then lock it from sliding forward or backwards , then finaly lock it from rotating left and right. All on a smooth factory bar.

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Barrells way is certainly one way to do it. No need to overthink it.

 

Racks are nice as they add a flat and non flexing platform. They also allow you to add other items or more than one kayak. I have three kayak racks, a rod box, a huge travel box and a bike rack. They rotate on and off depending on what I am doing with the family or fishing.

 

When you sit down and think about this is not a simple question at all.

 

Thule?

 

Yakima?

 

Malone?

 

Do the research. If you do lots of stuff a good rack system is almost a necessary part of the deal.

 

If you are just running and gunning the factory roof racks on a mountaineer are rated at about 190 lbs and you are fine. I use the foam pads (never really have a problem with themheadscratch.gif) I like some cusion especially from vibration. I dont need my transducer or seams being smashed around when a simple pool noodle will fix it. Less than a buck.

 

Think of it as cartalidge in your knee.wink.gif

 

my .02

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View PostBarrells way is certainly one way to do it. No need to overthink it.

 

Racks are nice as they add a flat and non flexing platform. They also allow you to add other items or more than one kayak. I have three kayak racks, a rod box, a huge travel box and a bike rack. They rotate on and off depending on what I am doing with the family or fishing.

 

When you sit down and think about this is not a simple question at all.

Thule?

Yakima?

Malone?

 

Do the research. If you do lots of stuff a good rack system is almost a necessary part of the deal.

 

If you are just running and gunning the factory roof racks on a mountaineer are rated at about 190 lbs and you are fine. I use the foam pads (never really have a problem with themheadscratch.gif) I like some cusion especially from vibration. I dont need my transducer or seams being smashed around when a simple pool noodle will fix it. Less than a buck.

 

Think of it as cartalidge in your knee.wink.gif

 

my .02

 

Sounds like you are a candidate for a trailer. I like the idea of a trailer for the guys who dont have a pickup. I dont use one or sell them but can see how you could set up a trailer realy nice to just hold 2 to 4 kayaks and a locking tool box in the front and all the other gear that might be needed for a weekend in the mountains or at the shore.

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View PostHave not seen that problem in modern cars and suv's and I have strapped thousands of kayaks to factory bars including a 90 pound pro angler to a guys car last week. You dont put the kayak dead center on the bar anyway always over on the passenger side for more eficient strapping technique.

 

 

 

Here is an example. I have a brand new escalade with factory crossbars, prior to that I had an 07 Tahoe with factory crossbars. Now according to Yakama's book, they only make a ski rack that will fit onto those crossbars. According to my owners manual the load rating on the cross bars is only 60lbs. Now I have an Outback....your telling me that it is completely safe to load that yak onto the top of my factory crossbars with the right straps? I would considerate it a modern vehicle and because of it's cost, I'm sure you can understand my concern.

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