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fishweewee

fda: cheerios might as well be a drug

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Although the marketing buttholes at General Mills ought to be taken out and shot, for claiming that uber sugar-laden Honey-Nut Cheerios are good for you. mad.gifkooky.gif

There's enough sugar in one bowl to turn a pancreas blue. 'Lower your cholesterol; ruin your pancreas'. shakehead.gif

 

High triglycerides, (carbs), are now thought to be a better indicator of potential heart disease than cholesterol. cwm13.gif

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Triglycerides are actually blood fats, not sugars. You are correct that many experts believe there's a link between carb rich diets and elevated cholesterol, once thought to only be caused by fat concumption, which is only the case with certain fats among other factors.

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General Mills should not marketing this cereal as healthful on any level. Existing labeling laws have ensured that the consumer has the info needed to make in informed decision for themselves.

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View PostTriglycerides are actually blood fats, not sugars. You are correct that many experts believe there's a link between carb rich diets and elevated cholesterol, once thought to only be caused by fat concumption, which is only the case with certain fats among other factors.

 

 

Atkins & South Beach have served me well. My last cholesterol test had me at a TC of 120, with an HDL of 45. (But my endo still wanted to put me on a Statin. kooky.gif 'Eff that, I told her.cwm13.gif ) But my bicycling helps a lot, too.

 

For my body type, carbs are quite figuratively 'The Devil'.

 

The new, up & coming blood test standard for heart disease, amy well end up being the C-Reactive Protein test, which measures inflammation of the blood vessels. It has a side benefit of detecting susceptibility to Rheumatoid arthritis.

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View PostAtkins & South Beach have served me well. My last cholesterol test had me at a TC of 120, with an HDL of 45. (But my endo still wanted to put me on a Statin. kooky.gif 'Eff that, I told her.cwm13.gif ) But my bicycling helps a lot, too.

 

For my body type, carbs are quite figuratively 'The Devil'.

 

The new, up & coming blood test standard for heart disease, amy well end up being the C-Reactive Protein test, which measures inflammation of the blood vessels. It has a side benefit of detecting susceptibility to Rheumatoid arthritis.

 

 

I'm learning that myself. Put on a few pounds, and tried out the South Beach approach and it's working out great. My body is responding very well to it. A few more pounds and I might even be back to being able to climbing halfway decently on the bike. However, I do thirst for carbs if I've done a long ride, and I find it hard not to bonk after about two hours on a ride without sugary nutrition.

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View PostI'm learning that myself. Put on a few pounds, and tried out the South Beach approach and it's working out great. My body is responding very well to it. A few more pounds and I might even be back to being able to climbing halfway decently on the bike. However, I do thirst for carbs if I've done a long ride, and I find it hard not to bonk after about two hours on a ride without sugary nutrition.

 

 

Dude, Well I'll be gawddammed, and dipped in butter; we do have something in common. Riding is my passion. It is but one more thing that I manage to be mediocre in. wink.giffrown.gif

 

We all bonk after two hours; three hours max, of hard exertion. Something to do with lactic acid, or some such thing, I think. Don't knock yourself for it. I tend to be rather uninterested in eating after a long-ride, but if the appetite for carbs kicks in, I try to head for fruit, and/or high protein drink mix. But I do have the tendency to 'fall off the wagon', every now and again. wink.gif

 

At my age, and heft, I avoid hills like the plague. I love to ride, but I'm not willing to blow out my knees, or my heart, for bragging rights. (I've spent more than enough time in the 'crash house' to know that it is best to avoid the place at all reasonable cost.) 'Eff that. I stick to the flats, near the beach, and ride high in the cranks, doing speed intervals, to compensate.

 

(My average ride is a quarter Century, 3 to 4 times a week, with a third of a Century every other week. A half Century every month. The best I've ever done was a three quarters Century, and it damn near killed me! freak.gifwink.gif I fear I'll never be able to manage a full Century ride.) frown.gif

 

Clint Eastwood, as Dirty Harry, said 'A man's got to know his limitations'. Over time, I have finally come to accept this with some measure of grace. It was'nt easy. My mentor is a master cyclist, but he is of an entirely different body type: a true Ectomorph. Tall, lanky, lean, with powerful leg muscles, he routinely did Century and Century and a half rides. I know; I drove his SAG wagon.

 

(I once followed him up Hurricane Mountain Road, in East Conway, NH in 95 degree heat, on a full Century ride. It did'nt phase him, but later that day, it blew out the transmission on my '92 Ford 'Exploder'. (Aptly nick-named, as it turned out. cwm13.gif ) It is a monster of a hill, with 8 or 9% grades, maybe more, IIRC; Levi Leipheimer rides it for practice.)

 

(But my mentor must see some potential in me. He bought me an Specialized Roubaix last year. It would be most rude and ungracious of me not to ride it. wink.gifbiggrin.gif )

 

I am what is referred to in bicycle parlance as a 'Clydesdale', a true Endomorph, which makes strenous exercise interesting, to say the least. But, within the parameters of Clints clever big-screen advice, I make do. wink.gif

 

To sum up, bicycling is a phenomenol way to lower blood fats, control blood sugars, lose/maintain weight, gain muscle, and relieve stress, in a relatively safe, non-jarring, low bone impact way. I recommend it to one and all. If I can do it, anyone can. wink.gif

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View PostCheerios is the new gateway drug. First Cheerios then heroin.

 

 

First Cheerios, then the weed. Or is it 'First Kashi, then the weed'? I forget. headscratch.gifwink.gif

 

Man, I'm Jonesin' for some granola bars, dudes. wink.gif

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I'm definitely not a cyclist build either, and right now, I'm an official clyde. However, I've got a sick streak in me, and for some reason, I hunt out the hills.kooky.gif I got into cycling from doing triathlons, and cycling quickly became my favorite flavor of the three disciplines. I average about 60-70 miles a week between two rides. Occasionally, I hit the local group ride, and try not to get dropped for as long as I can.biggrin.gif I also ride a lot with my neighbors who were big racers (she rode for Trek for a few years), and they're nice enough to wait for me on the hills and pull me on the flats.

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Anybody who bashes cheerios doesn't know the FACTS

 

Calories 103 Calories from Fat 15 % Daily Value * Total Fat 2g3% Saturated Fat 0g0% Monounsaturated Fat 0.5g Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5g Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg0% Sodium 186mg8% Potassium 170mg5% Total Carbohydrate 21g7% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 1g Protein 3g6%Vitamin A16% Vitamin C11% Calcium11% Iron49% Vitamin D10% Thiamin (B1)25% Riboflavin (B2)25% Niacin (B3)25% Vitamin B625% Folic Acid (Folate)50% Vitamin B1225% Magnesium10%Zinc25% Copper2%

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