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Gas Prices

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notice our gas prices are heading over 2.00 per gal again,,,by Memorial Day probaly hit $2.50mad.gif ...the scummers on Wall Street figure " O the economy is looking better so lets jack the prices of oil and gas and make$$$$$$$$$$$$...put the stock people on a boat and send them to Somalia...>))>

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Let the gouging commence.............ususally WV is uber high............2.19 when I left........usually expect 0.20 -0.25 differential at 113/404 junction.......today...........2.09...........grea se up their gonna get us.

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Lets hope we find a replacemen for oil ASAP. Then we can tell them to shove it.

 

Allthough Ill feel bad for the middle east considering thats how a bunch of countries make their money... wait a sec NAHHH SCREW THEM cwm27.gif

 

Lets hope the oil guys dont get to gouge anyone, anymore, real soon!

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View Postnotice our gas prices are heading over 2.00 per gal again,,,by Memorial Day probaly hit $2.50mad.gif ...the scummers on Wall Street figure " O the economy is looking better so lets jack the prices of oil and gas and make$$$$$$$$$$$$...put the stock people on a boat and send them to Somalia...>))>

 

Uhhhhh, the recent surge in pump prices are less the fault of greedy Wall Street "scummers" and more the fault of hemp-wearing leftie "save the planet" enviro-wackos clapping.gifbiggrin.gif. . .

 

It's an annual occurrence and it is caused by the summer blend changeover. We are smack in the middle between two important dates . . . May 1st when the first drop in vapor pressure rating is mandated and June 1st when only the lowest vapor pressure rated gas can be in the system . . .

 

Short explanation:

There are two key (although not the only) specifications that refiners must meet for gasoline. The gasoline needs to have the proper octane, and it needs to have the proper Reid vapor pressure (RVP). While the octane of a particular grade is constant throughout the year, the RVP spec changes with the seasons.

 

The RVP is based on a test that measures vapor pressure of the gasoline blend at 100 degrees F. Normal atmospheric pressure varies, but is usually around 14.7 lbs per square inch (psi). Atmospheric pressure is caused by the weight of the air over our heads. If a liquid has a vapor pressure of greater than normal atmospheric pressure, that liquid boils. For example, when you heat a pan of water, the vapor pressure increases until it reaches atmospheric pressure. At that point, the water begins to boil.

 

In the summer, when temperatures can exceed 100 degrees F in many locations, it is important that the RVP of gasoline is well below 14.7. Otherwise, it can pressure up your gas tanks and gas cans, and it can boil in open containers. Gas that is vaporized ends up in the atmosphere, and contributes to air pollution. Therefore, the
EPA has declared that summer gasoline blends may not exceed 7.8 psi in some locations, and 9.0 psi in others.
The particulars vary, but key considerations are the altitude and motor vehicle density of a specific location.

:
As gasoline evaporates, volatile organic compounds (VOC's) enter the atmosphere and contribute to ozone formation. Gasoline's propensity to evaporate is measured by Reid vapor pressure (RVP). In order to control VOC emissions, the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require that all gasoline be limited to an RVP maximum of 9.0 psi during the summer high ozone season, which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established as running from June 1 to September 15. The Act also authorized the EPA to set more stringent standards for nonattainment areas. As a result, EPA limits areas designated as "high volatility non-attainment" to a maximum RVP of 7.8 psi during the high ozone season. Some States elected to require even more stringent restrictions to achieve local clean air goals, and require 7.2- and 7.0-psi gasolines.

Butane, which has an RVP of 52 psi, can be blended into gasoline in higher proportions in the winter because the vapor pressure allowance is higher. There are two advantages in doing this. First, butane is a cheaper blending component than most of the other ingredients. That makes fall and winter gasoline cheaper to produce. But butane also adds to the total gasoline pool, so that means that gasoline supplies increase in the winter as more butane is thrown into the mix. Not only that, but this all takes place after summer driving season, when demand typically falls off. These factors normally combine each year to reduce gasoline prices in the fall (even in non-election years). The RVP is stepped back down to summer levels starting in the spring, and this usually causes prices to increase.

 

Transition Schedule

 

The EPA publishes a schedule for the RVP transition:

 

The schedule varies somewhat from region to region, but in general is as follows. After allowing vapor pressures as high as 15 psig in the winter, the limit drops on May 1st:

 

May: 9.0 psig

June, Sept. 15: 7/7.8 psig

 

More congested areas and hotter areas will tend to have a limit of 7.0 psig, while cooler climates generally opt for 7.8 psig. Some cooler climates don't even require a reduction, and have a 9.0 psig limit throughout the summer.

 

Refiners will start to pull down their inventory of winter gasoline well in advance of the May 1st deadline. On that date, all gasoline in the system has to meet the stricter requirements. This is a key reason that gasoline starts to become more expensive in the spring.

 

 

But, continue on with your parroting the mantra though . . .

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$2.49 for regular at a Mobil station in western nassau this morning....10 days ago it was $2.19 mad.gif Funny, but Exxon/Mobil was complaining a week or so ago about a great reduction in profits headscratch.gif How can this country ever find an alternative to oil when it's the government, through their EPA mandates, that are controlling the price of oil. Big oil will never let this country find any alternatives. Instead, they'll just ask us to spread our cheeks widermad.gif

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View PostLets hope we find a replacemen for oil ASAP. Then we can tell them to shove it.

 

Allthough Ill feel bad for the middle east considering thats how a bunch of countries make their money... wait a sec NAHHH SCREW THEM cwm27.gif

 

Lets hope the oil guys dont get to gouge anyone, anymore, real soon!

 

 

 

Personally, I've been waiting on another source since around 1974, thats 35 years and counting, not alot has happened. Then again, health insurance and NJ car insurance have been an issue about as long or longer. If they make a real effort, the masses won't see any alternate fueled vehicles before 2020. So, get used to being abused on gas costs for the forseeable future.

 

My advice, buy something thats as efficient as you can buy for the purpose, obviously a family of 5 doesn't do well with a Honda Civic, on the otherhand the soccer moms don't need an Escalade or Excursion, a Cherokke, Explorer type SUV is sufficient.

 

Folks in the USA need to learn that pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered.,

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we go through this every spring.

 

guys, gas prices tend to be seasonal.

 

we consume more during the spring and summer driving season. prices go up.

 

sure, we're in a recession, and overall demand is down, but our dollar and purchasing power have become increasingly worthless too.

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View PostAll the money we spent in Iraq, gas should be free, suns dah beeches

 

All the money spent bailing everything out, you'd think the pres could have bought you and I a few gallonsfrown.gif

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