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DadaI3

Martha's Vineyard crabs and shrimps

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Do you have any experience with shrimps, crabs or worms flies?

Ive been chasing shallows have seen a lot of fish, but fish just followed my sand eel and than escaped. They were chasing something on bottom, but what? Sorry, but Iam trying to fill my fly box again and get ready for summer holiday....

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Go to Larry's or one of the other Fly Shops on MV and get a few Skok's Mole crab and Flounder flies.

 

Are the fish coming up on to the beach or flat with a rising tide? If they are not chasing sand eels they are probably hunting mole crabes or baby flounder.

 

A mole crab has no pincers. The body os almost egg shaped and is usually tan and they burrow in to the sand or mixed sand and gravel to hide from cruising striped bass. The size runs from about one inch to half an inch.

 

If you have tan or even brown and white decivers they might fool the bass.

 

If you spot a bass crusing a guzzle (a deeper depression) on the flat lay your fly in front of him in the guzzle and let it sit still. When the bass is about 2 feet from it, twitch it slightly. If he is hunting mole crabs or flounder he will hit it quickly strip hook him when you see his red gills flair.

 

A striped bass pounces on the crab and inhales it like a vacum cleaner. It flairs its gills to let the sand blow out thru the gills as it inhales the crab.

 

It is a very exciting method of sight fishing.

 

Good Luck and enjoy the Vineyard.

 

PS - You might enjoy reading Alan Caolo's book Sight Fishing for Striped Bass. The fly shops should have a copy or a book store on the island. If you are staying a while go on Amazon and order it. If they sell that book slightly used they are sold at bargain prices.

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RE: Do you have any experience with shrimps, crabs or worms flies?

 

Affirmative, although more on the RI mainland and on Block Island. I tend to fish the shrimp and worm patterns (and for that matter, sand eels) up near the surface, using a system of droppers and floats to suspend the flies near the surface.

 

Favorite shrimp pattern is the General Practitioner and its many variances. Worm, Ken Abrames' Orange Ruthless (that fly has been a huge producer for me, even when there are no clam worms around).

 

Haven't gotten into crab patterns, but I will this summer.

 

You didn't ask, but my favorite sand eel pattern is tied on a #6 Atlantic Salmon hook, with about 30 total mixed bucktail hairs and a single strand of flash, braind body and a few strands of krystal flash topping. Very, very sparse. Very, very lethal. ;-)

 

Good luck! I guess I need to get my summer striper box in order, too.

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View PostDo you have any experience with shrimps, crabs or worms flies?

Ive been chasing shallows have seen a lot of fish, but fish just followed my sand eel and than escaped. They were chasing something on bottom, but what? Sorry, but Iam trying to fill my fly box again and get ready for summer holiday....

 

 

Dada: From my experience flyfishing flats on the Vineyard, a tan or cream crab fly is the ticket. A Merkin without legs, a McCrab pattern or any mostly tan, crab fly. The key is the presentation as the flats stripers are approaching you. That's for you to work out as the "presentation" always seems to change! I've had most success with dime sized crab flies, BTW. Good luck.

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Aha! the right thread into which to insert a question.

 

Have you tied your small tan crabs on a circle hook, and if so, with what result?

 

A fly being sucked off the bottom .... oughta be an ideal presentation/bite situation for a small circle. I think.

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Brian,

I'm going to bring some circle hook flies to the Spring Fling and force you to fish them so you can learn that circle hooks don't require any unique circumstances or unique feeding behavior or unique anything. Of course, since no fish are ever caught at a Fling you won't learn anything.

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Brian,

 

Loon uses circle hooks almost exclusively. He is coming to worm camp and I'm sure he can fill you in on their catching ability. I'm curious my self. I've participated in two circle hook studies using bait for stiped bass. The trick is not to react to the hit by jerking the rod to sink the hook. Take the hit and could to 5 or 10 or as you feel the fish move away with its prize. close the bail or put it in gear and let the hook ride up the fish's gullet and it will 99.9% of the time embed its point in the corner of the mouth the line is slliding thru.

 

In fly fishing when you feel the tug of the hook connecting with the corner strip strike firmly once or twice to secure it in the fish's mouth. It is easy to catch and release from the corner location than havng to force it out of the gullet, etc.

 

Mass. F&G did a study on a headboat out of Falmouth a few years ago. They fished J hooks with liver fishermen and circle hooks on rods secured tothe rail with no fisherman attending. The secured rods and circle hooks caught more fish than the fishermen.

 

Will it work on a mole crab or merkin presentaion? I'm not sure. headscratch.gifheadscratch.gif But we can find out in a couple of weeks.

 

My good looking girl friend is letting me stay at her house on the lake for the wedding and there I will remain until the morning of May 22 when I leave for Quonny Pond.

 

The cottage should have a wireless connection, if you want to record our adventures and share them with the stay at homeboys. If that isn't connected, there is "Dave's Coffee House" and ladies underware emporium just up the hill from the cottage. Great coffee and triple sized muffins of all sorts. Blueberry or corn are my favorites, along with a cuppa "Quonny Pond Blend" or "Weepapaug Simatra". biggrin.gif

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Thanks a lot guys.. Iwasnt expact so many answers... Somehow I totaly forgot about flounders, but how big the fly suppose to be and what pattern(picturesmile.gif , please)? Also the crabs, when Ive been there everybody fishing with sand eels, huge poppers or bunkers.. But somehow Ididnt tried them.. How about night? Crabs in same colour? And what Iam still not able to understand is floating worm aspecially redkooky.gif

Iam gonna be there for summer, last year I really easily felt in love with Pauls point, this year Ill stay somewhere around OB, so State beach... Still faaar away from Lobster villefrown.gif .... Thanks a lot, Dada

 

Tight Lines

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Cinder worms. Go tothe search section and click it. Tyoe in Cinder Worms. There shuld be sevral threads about them including pictures.

 

Best time to observe a hatch is during the new and full moon periods. The lower tides during the day warm the mud the worms are incubating in. They will respond to the warmer water and swarm. This atracks predators (especially striped bass) and they sip the worms as they wiggle and squirm near and on the top of the water. Just like trout do to emerging may flys.

 

The hatch's are rare and a local angler may have knowledge of the spots it may happen. If you fish stte beach fish the incoming tide in the bay after it flows in from the sea. Fish usually line up to feed on bait being pushed into the bay. I like the right side of the bridge.

 

Storms may have changed the contour of the flow but three years ago the right side inflow produced some nice fish.

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RJ, I keep reading that the success or failure of circle hooks depends on how the fish takes the fly/lure/bait. A fish might take an imitation sandeel or spearing quite differently from how it takes a crab. I will bring my tying stuff up to RI as usual, we'll have lots of raw material with which to goof around.

 

Got a quart or two of the Sapphire coming, with which to flavor your coffee.

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OK, Dada, gotcha.

 

As others have mentioned, these worms swarm near the surface, and you can clearly see them wriggling about as they swim. They vary in size and color (in RI I have seen them as small as 1" and as large as 3", and there are all kinds of worms that are even bigger) and the new moon is a good time to be on the lookout for them.

 

When fishing worm patterns during a swarm, I typically use a floating line, a foam indicator and a floating fly (like a Gurgler) to keep my rig (consisting of two clam worm fly droppers) suspended near the surface. I also tend to dead drift the rig.

 

An RLS Ruthless (in orange and red) is my go-to pattern. YMMV.

 

Hope that helps. :-)

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RJ: I ve been around bridge few times, I dont know why, but too many people, cars... I prefered calm spots like Ceeder tree neck or sometimes Tashmo(privat side)... I ll study more about worms and flounders patterns, but too much stress right now, college is finishing....cwm33.gif

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D,

 

The pond in Tashmoo will probable support worm hatches and your next best time is this up coming week end or a little earlier.

 

Do a goggle map for MV and then expand the map to show cast Tashmoo pond and click the satellite button.

 

Look for the darker patches under the water. They will be mud banks. The new moon will cause extreme high and low tides. begingin two or three days before the new moon date and after it as well. I'm traveling now and do not have a callendar handy, but the new moon will occur on or about May 21st.

 

If you have a low tide a Tashmoo during warm and sunny days it will warm up the pond water and the exposed and almost exposed mud banks. This should trigger a worm spawn that could last for 2 to 6 days. Afternoons thru dark are the best times for sqarms of worms.

 

You are lucky to have access to Tashmoo's private side. It is a great piece of water and you should beable to find a worm spawn in it.

 

Menensha and Squibnockett Ponds are also likely places to seek worm spawing this coming week and the holiday weekend. I hope you will be on the island and finished with school by the end of this week.

 

Are you going to school on MV or the mainland?

 

Another pond that is great fishing is Lagoon Pond on the road between Vineyard Haven and Oak Bluffs.

 

If you have access to a kayak and the ability to transport it to the ponds above, finding worm spawns on the surface will be easier. The worms will come out of the mud and swim to the surface in their hundres and thousands. You will see nervous water on calm days. Also look for small splashes made by feeding striped bass.

 

Cape Poge Bay should have some opportunity for worm hatches inside the north neck portion of the bay. Again, use the satellite maps to locake the dare patches for your plan of attack on all the Ponds.

 

Enjoy yourself this summer, work hard, play hard and you will be smarter, stronger and happier for the effort.

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