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carp13

Serious question for experieced yakkers

21 posts in this topic

I'm new to the sport and picking up my Malibu Stealth in two days,now what I'm about to ask i am not planning to try anytime soon.I will wait until I feel I am experienced enough to do so,or maybe not at all depending on the information/advice I get here.Is it possible to fish the mainstream/channel of the Connecticut River between Hartford and Wethersfield during normal water levels?Seems like it might be alot to handle,boat control while concentrating on fishing.I,ve also heard that anchoring in current can be dangerous.I understand a tree coming downsteram just below the surface can swamp a kayak instantly without quick decisive action.Anyone ever hook a 30-40 inch striper on a kayak while in heavy river current?Is it possible to land one without getting towed all the way to Old Lyme?I know,lots of questions here,I just can't find any information on this type fishing.How about a controlled drift?Is that a feasible alternative to anchoring?Or are there too many snags and will freeing up lines and maintaining boat control be impossible.Any experience with anything I mentioned here will be greatly appreciated.Thank you in advance...please no lectures on pfd's,I have one and plan to always wear it while on the river or the ocean.Thanks.

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legal disclaimer.... cwm27.gif

 

FIRST: IT IS YOUR LIFE... NOT MINE.... and SAFETY FIRST.... that being said...

 

i think it depends on the flow rate and traffic of your local river.... while it's not the safest or most sane thing to do, sometimes there's no way around it if you want to get at the fish...

 

man... i know i'm going to get flamed for this but... i anchor up and fish the delaware river at several spots without any problems. i've also done it, bayside within a mile of the indian river inlet kooky.gif .... just make sure you have an anchor that is rated well over the weight and length of your yak and have at least 50feet of anchor line (although 100ft is better depending on depth you're fishing).... i would recommend an anchor line that is at least 1/4" diameter as it is exceeding hard on the hands to try to pull up a set anchor while sitting in a 10 knot current... also have a knife handy to cut the anchor line if necessary...

 

being taken on a sleigh ride is cool and should generally be the least of your concerns, unless a fish could possibly take you into 5foot tall standing waves right in front of an inlet cwm31.gif .... just know where the danger is and be ready to cut off a good fish if necessary...

 

ps... if you're worried about yak handling with or without a fish on in such conditions, i don't think you ready or experienced enough to try this yet

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Good so I'm not insane,appreciate the info Scooter.You're right though,I'm not ready for this yet but I wanted to know if it can be done.This type of fishing is a goal of mine once I achieve the skills necessary to pull it off....OH,and I do intend to wear a knife on my pfd at all times.Thanks again.

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yea... its an experience thing .. if your a newb ... CT river with flood condictions is not a good place to be -- nevermine anchor! plus the water is still cold...at least wait until the water rate comes down ...

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Carp...

 

I live in Wethersfield and fish that stretch of the river a lot.

 

I would not recommend fishing this area for the following reasons:

 

1. The river flow rate is incredibly high right now.

2. To deal with the current, you will need to be a very strong paddler...and considering you are new to the sport....

3. Submerged or barely submerged objects are everywhere this time of year. It is not uncommon to see a 50 foot tree floating down the river at 4 knots. That thing hits you, you're done.

4. Never anchor in rivers with current flow like that. It is a recipe for disaster, as I've seen first hand. Plus, most of the time, the anchor won't work because the river bed is a big mass of soft sediment.

 

Practice your paddling technique in the Coves. Get used to your boat. And simply wait til the river is actually manageable. If you want to cruise around and actually fish, launch from Wethersfield Cove (work that eastern side of the cove) or Keeney Cove, where you may find some perch, large/smallmouth bass, and maybe even a pike.

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Thank you very much for your input,it was exactly what I was looking for.I actually did fish Wethersfield Cove last weekend and got a nice smallie.I plan to check out keeney and also crow point cove and stay in those areas until I get my skills up to par and then maybe try the main flow during normal or low levels during the summer.I agree that the flow rate of the area that we are talking about seems a liitle intimidating and I'm not trying to die out there.Thank You again,you've been very helpful.

525

525

525

525

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View PostGood for you Carp.

 

Glad you did the right thing...and still got to fight a nice smallie! clapping.gif

 

Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions Soundfisher,your reply was exactly the kind of good information I was looking for.By the way,I did get the Smallmouth while working the east side.biggrin.gif

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I fish in a river, too, and have been contemplating building an anchor that's a heavier variant of a spider sinker, with wire "legs" that will straighten out under loads above and beyond normal anchoring.

 

Does this sound reasonable?

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View PostI fish in a river, too, and have been contemplating building an anchor that's a heavier variant of a spider sinker, with wire "legs" that will straighten out under loads above and beyond normal anchoring.Does this sound reasonable?

 

 

IMO that would be really hard to get just right.... rivers flow at differing rates and conditions, especially if you fish the tidal zones, not to mention the effects of swells from tankers going by, as I experience in the Delaware.

 

Engineering the 'legs' to just the right level of resistance to hold bottom but let go onder specific conditions would be hard to get right.... how about a quick release or a length of line that is easy to cut???....

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