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Feltsoul

Shaping peacock herl

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I tied up some decievers last night for the first time. Everything seemed to work well with the exception of the peacock herl top. It seems the herl stands above the top wing and does not form to the curve of the fly.

Any suggestions on how to get this materiel to obey. I'll try to post some pictures tonight.

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You can shape it with the back part of a sissors! put the sissors under or over the hurl & hold the hurl with your thumb.Now pull the hurl over the backside of your sissors & the hurl will shape in the direction of the way you pull it. Hope you understand!

You can also do this with your Hackle!

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Flytyingguy has got it right. It's like creating the curl on ribbon used to wrap presents. But go easy or it will curl too much -- just light pressure between your thumb and the back of your scissors. Another trick is to take the clump of herl, wet it, and see which way it naturally droops, and then lay it draped over the back and tie it in.

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I used to use it a lot, but have gotten away from herl. Instead, I usually go with peacock krystal flash.

 

You can try soaking it in warm water to soften it, then tie it in. Herl has a stiff stem, especially as you get down near the butt end where it would be attached to the main stem of a feather. Some will have a natural curve to them, that's the ones you want to use if possible.

 

If you're using strung herl, it's harder to find good pieces with the natural curve.

 

Unless you're tying to sell the flies and want them to look pretty, I wouldn't get too concerned about it. Herl is not particularly durable, and will likely get torn off anyway. Just go with what you have, use the curved herl as best you can & mix the straight pieces in to get the full affect that you desire. Then take them out & fish them. The fish won't care one way or another. biggrin.gif

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I have a love affair with peacock heart.gif . I honestly believe it has magical light reflecting properties found in no other material. Call me crazy, I've been called worse wink.gif .

 

All good points above icon14.gif .

 

I would add two tidbits;

 

First, try to get long thin peacock hearl, not the short, fat, stubby hearls. They tend to lay down better.

 

Second, watch your thread pressure. Hearl will flair just like bucktail if you crank it down. And once it flairs it doesn't unflair. Lighter thread pressure willl make it more manageable.

 

Good luck!

 

Alan

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View PostI have a love affair with peacock heart.gif . I honestly believe it has magical light reflecting properties found in no other material. Call me crazy, I've been called worse wink.gif .

 

All good points above icon14.gif .

 

I would add two tidbits;

 

First, try to get long thin peacock hearl, not the short, fat, stubby hearls. They tend to lay down better.

 

Second, watch your thread pressure. Hearl will flair just like bucktail if you crank it down. And once it flairs it doesn't unflair. Lighter thread pressure willl make it more manageable.

 

Good luck!

 

Alan

 

I have to agree! The colors when the hit the light are just beautiful, I think they add so much to the tie!

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View PostFlytyingguy has got it right. It's like creating the curl on ribbon used to wrap presents. But go easy or it will curl too much -- just light pressure between your thumb and the back of your scissors. Another trick is to take the clump of herl, wet it, and see which way it naturally droops, and then lay it draped over the back and tie it in.

 

 

Exactly, scissors as for ribbon, light pressure. I do the whole clump after it's tied in actually and go back for the few that didn't take the right curl after.

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I also use the scissors/ribbon method. As has been mentioned light pressure-you can always do more. I only apply the technique in the middle section of the length to add that hump to the back. I do not like to have the ends curled.

Hoop

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View PostI tied up some decievers last night for the first time. Everything seemed to work well with the exception of the peacock herl top. It seems the herl stands above the top wing and does not form to the curve of the fly.

Any suggestions on how to get this materiel to obey. I'll try to post some pictures tonight.

 

 

Scott,

 

the scissor method described above is spot on! Just like when people wrapping gifts curl the ribbon using the back of the scissor. Controls the material perfectly...

Try using hot pink Fluoro Fibre as the throat.......wink.gif

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Another method for the herl, if you have the time, is to wet the whole fly and use a hair dryer to dry it. Point the hair dryer directly in front of the hook eye and it will shape the herl to the contour of your fly...I got tired of waiting for my flies to dry, works great.

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I went back last night to my flies and tried the scissor method. Works perfect!

I just want to thank everyone for thier help and support. Of all the hobbies and interests I've been involved, the people (especially on this site) have been incredible. Where else (in any other endeaver) can you get help from the best in the world? No where. Thanks again.

Scott

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