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nfnDrum

Fish on!

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One thing I'm curious does a good sized fish have the leverage to tip your ass over .. Lets say your reel is engaged I see allot of reels in holders that are horizontal to the boat ... will the yak automatically straiten out or could you get pulled sideways?

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As long as you set the drag right to give you enough time and line to handle the fish you should be OK. All you do then is get the fish to be directly forward of you while you fight it, and you will get pulled. Its good to have a 7 to 8 ft rod that will give you the ability to move the tip of the rod to the front of your kayak and the sides if need be more efficiantly to get the position you desire.

 

If you dont set your drag right 2 things can happen if a big fish is on :

 

1- you migh take a spill.cwm31.gif

2- your rod might fly out of its holder.

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It can be an adventure. I had to paddle back to the beach once and get off to fight a big blue that was dragging me out to sea. Trying to unhook a large blue I made a sudden move and almost tipped but that was me not the fish.

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ya gotta think.. you're not in a fixed position anymore. the kayak moves with the fish. when she pulls you follow. a properly set drag is a given. most of the fish will tow you around a little. that takes the leverage off of you tipping.

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Keeping the drag light and then slowly increasing it after the strike will also allow for a higher hook up percentage as well as keeping you from flipping.

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Uhhh......not bustin' here, but I really don't think your average fish is gonna flip you over in your yak....I hauled my first Yak-Caught Fish in this past December in Kipto.....In the dark!!! 46-1/2 in and 38.4 lbs.........lots of screamin' drag....pulling me this way and that way for over 75 yds. of action....to the surface and down....ALL off the port side!!! Up and down she went...pullin' hard....then I leadered her.....slung my left leg out of the yak........grabbed the bottom lip with both hands and used my arms and leg to push her over into the yak.....in my lap!!! Never once did I feel tippy!!!

 

A BIG BITER....now that might be a different story on the initial run... and if you try and fight off the side!!!

 

PC130693.jpg

 

PC130697.jpg

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View PostKeeping the drag light and then slowly increasing it after the strike will also allow for a higher hook up percentage as well as keeping you from flipping.

 

That's why I bought a Baitrunner 3500b, so I can troll on a light drag setting, and if I get a hit grab the rod and be set for tension when I flip it to "fighting" drag. I have not yet had an opportunity to see how it works in practice though. Tightening drag on a fighting fish seems a recipe for breaking off, and always makes me nervous when I do it on a shoregoing non-baitrunner spinning outfit.

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Some kayaks won't turn into the fish. The Heritage Fisherman was one. I bought it on a road side deal for a 100 bucks 7 years ago and sold it to rec paddler for 400...I wonder how fast the rep from former Heritage now Native will come out here to defend my above statement on not turning into the fish? cwm27.gif

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once I was trolling a T&W @ slow walk speed

before I knew it the fish stopped my forward momentum and I'm travelling backwards

LOL

I used the rudder to start my spin in reverse

no problems or concerns

fun ride

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It's possible but it isn't a major concern of mine.

 

When a fish is out away from the kayak, if it runs or dives to the bottom, not only do you have the drag but even if it's directly off port or starboard, it will spin the yak and tow you a little bit.

 

The "danger" area is when they're close up. If a fish decides to dive, in theory, this is when I would think it would be the most likely time to flip. Of course, you still have your drag and you can put a bunch of leverage on a fish when they're close in. You just have to make sure you're using the rod against them and not the other way around.

 

I've never felt like I was in danger from a fish though.

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