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HCowen

Best tying tips an SOL'er can offer......

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Okay guys & gals,

 

We always seem to get plenty of new folks getting into tying around here.That is GREAT for the industry (especially when the youngsters get involved on this site). So let's get everyoine's BEST tips with regards to tying....it could be how you tie the eyes of your Clouser down so they do not move or how to easily lay down your flash...From the simple to the difficult. Let's make this a thread that tiers for many months can come back to....If you have plenty of tips or think of more later, keep'em coming. I will start it off below:

 

When using bucktail that many times comes out of the package and flairs, the best way to tie this material in without constantly picking out the unruley pieces is to grab the material in one hand by the butts, then wet your thumb and forefinger of the other hand and twist/roll the material as you work your way toward the tips. This twines the bucktail within itself making it lie onto the hook perfectly.

 

HC

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I am assuming you are right handed. To tie a taper head, leave about a hook eye width for the size of the head. Start with the thread on the left side of the head space. Start wrapping toward the hook eye. Each wrap should touch the previous wrap with no gaps and increase the tension toward the hook eye. Repeat as many times as necessary to lock in the material. The key is starting the thread on the left and increasing tension toward the right. Have fun tying.

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My tip is to learn to tie with your sissors in your hands at all times. You will tie faster and nicer flies. They are just there and you are much more likely to trim and finish parts of the flies if they are a natural extension of your hands. Pretty soon, people will start calling you "Edward Sissorhands."

 

- ATG

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View Postloading a bobbin

 

push a small amount of thread into the bottom tube of the bobbin, then suck the thread out like a straw wink.gif

 

 

An alternative to this is to take a 10" peice of 8lb mono, fold in half, push the folded end through the top of the bobbin, fish the thread through the mono and pull through shaft.

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I see so many posts about learning to tie! Bucktail ( Jigs ) Teasers,ETC

Why does the material turn? Why does the bucktail hair flair?

Welcome New Tyers! Your in for a treat!! But be prepared to spend some money LOL

1st take the hook & wrap some thread from the eye of the hook to the bend of the hook! ( Gives the material something to grip on to ) Then cut a piece of bucktail & hold it in your fingers in the middle of the piece you cut! Look at the lengh of the hair & gently pull out the pieces that are longer,shorter than the bunch of the hair . Try & get the hair uniform! A wet finger will help to get the profile you are looking for. At the bottom of the piece that you cut,trim the hair so it is even! Now tie ( Wrap ) The hair not pulling it to tight( Which will give you the flair your not looking for) until the hair is positioned on the hook. Once the hair is on the hook you now can tighten down harder with the thread,pinching the material so it won't flair up.Repeat the prosses,add color , flash ETC & don't be affaris to expeirment!

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Today I dumped a bunch of 34007 hooks on my desk from #4 to 2/0. To sort them I hung them on my thread holder on my vice. I have done this more than once and this is a quick and simple way to clean up the mess. I also use the thread holder to hang my hooks for the flies I am going to tie during a tying scession.

525

 

Brad

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when the air is real dry like it is in winter, you'll often wind up with your legs covered in stripped hackle, cut bucktail, etc after a night of tying(unless you're some kinda neatfreak and use one of those timming baskets and what not). anywho, if you keep a spray bottle next to your bench, when done, stand up, give a light mist onto your hands, and then just wipe downward and "roll" all the gunk off. the water helps keep it all together and cut down ont he static electricity instead of just fluffing the stuff around in the air, just to land on you again.

 

you can use myriad of items to hold your work down while it dries, you trim it, etc. i've used those mini plastic clamps, clothespins, pipe cleaners, and those twist ties from the bread bags.

 

anytime you're using a product that is sold in hanks, and is held together using a zip tie, occasionally check it to make sure it's tight. more than once i've had a bunch of material slip out, because the little bits that were left fell out or were brushed out or whatever.

 

a straightened hook or thin nail stuck into the end of a glue stick make a cheap and effective bodkin.

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Hi, The late, great Charlie DeFeo showed me this tip. You need a .38 shell casing (or whatever). Cut the hair from the tail, twist a little to force into the shell casing. Tap the casing on the desk a couple or more times. Voila. the butt-ends are perfectly aligned. Pick and choose too-longs if you want. Good tying!! Casey Ghee.

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When working with bucktail or any other static gathering material that sticks to everything I've done the following; Next time you or wife does the laundry, grab the used dryer sheet out of the dryer and use it at the vice. I wipe down the work surface and the vice and my fingers to avoid the hair sticking to me or anything else. You can even stroke the bucktail with the used static sheet and it will behave better. I suggest "used" because the new ones out of the box will stink up your flies and it leaves a residue.

 

JA

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If your a beginner or even if you've been at it a while, fly tying should be an endevour that your always trying to improve. I suggest trying to spend time at the vice ever day, even if your only tying one fly at time, just put the time in. Your muscle memory will rapidly improve and you will find that once difficult tasks, (like spinning deer hair) become easier. I know that with today's lifestyle it's hard to dedicate alot of time to something like flytying but even if it's only 10 to 15 minutes a day I promise you will see improvement.

 

JA

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