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SLR Digital Photography Thread

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Hopefuly some of the pros will chime in. I have been tryin go to learn My Nikon D60. I have been running into some issues getting the clearest photo possible. I am really interested in photographing action picutes. IE Ocean Waves, Sports, Casting, Fishing some light porn (just kidding) but you get the jist. What apeture settings and shutter speed would be recomeneded for these scenerios?

 

1)Overcast Day On the Surf

2)Bright Sunny Day on Surf Capturing Waves

3)Sunrise and Sunset

4)fish Jumping out of water.

 

I understand that a faster shutter speed would be optimal, it just seems that i cannot match the apeture settings with the shutter speed correct. I dont want to be that guy that has a $1000 worth of equipment and uses the auto setting.

 

I have the 18m - 55m VR and the 55 - 200VR lense. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Here are some sample images that I would like to match in quality:

 

courtest of "Mighty Quinn"

attachment.php?attachmentid=198334&d=123

 

Courtesy of "allen sklar"

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=198866&d=123

 

Courtesy of "BelAirSteve"

attachment.php?attachmentid=202543&d=123

attachment.php?attachmentid=202542&d=123

 

Courtesy of "allen sklar"

attachment.php?attachmentid=210632&d=123

 

Courtesy of "riverrunner"

attachment.php?attachmentid=218151&d=123

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View Posti have a D80.Have you tried using the ISO settings to increase or decrease your shutter speed?

 

 

I have played with the ISO, but it seems as if when i raise the iso, it creates a ton more blur. Its strange since you would expect it to create a sharper image. This is why I think i have the combination screwed up with the apeture settings. I understand there is a major learning curve redface.gif

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Shutter speed stops the action. (fishing jumping fast shutter speed, sunset shot lower shutter speed)

 

Aperture is going to give you depth of field. (lower number with give you a blurred background, higher number will give you deeper focus of the background)

 

If light is low you will need a longer shutter speed hence a larger aperture setting (lower setting)

 

The higher the ISO the more noise you will get. Try not to up it unless you it is necessary, to get the shot.

 

Sharpness comes down to two things your glass and steadiness. If you want super sharp shots shoot with a tripod.

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when you use your zoom hand held and zoom-in at the 200 your shake factor is going to increase because you're crunching your image.I use a mono pod when using larger zoom lenses.relax,shoot on exhale,don't hold the camera up for long periods.that will increase shaking.

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You want to keep your shutter speed at least the length of your zoom or faster.

 

If you are at 100mm you want a shutter speed of 1/125, at 200 you will want to be at 1/250 . You really do not want to hand hold any shot with a shutter speed below 1/60 without good support.

 

VR helps but also try with it off. (sometimes it can make more problems, it is a computer. redface.gif)

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remember the shots you posted as examples can be"enhanced" with the computer software.Not saying they were.The computer is your darkroom.You still need a sharp image to start.I would turn off all your vr and auto completely.Go manual and take shots of the same scene at different iso and f-stop.Then try the same image on all auto and see what the camera sees.A 2gig card gives you appx 450 shots.go practice,practice,practice.Take a note book and record your settings with the shot.It's time consuming but you'll learn from the notes.when I first got a camera[film] that's what worked for me.

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View PostI have been tryin go to learn My Nikon D60. I have been running into some issues getting the clearest photo possible.

 

Obviously because you are using a Nikon. tongue.gif

Just kidding. I work for Canon. - No I can't get anybody free/cheap stuff. For the record I work in pro video.

 

To shoot the kind of action that you want to you will need "fast" glass. These are lenses that can achieve low F stops. The most important information about a lens is the f number. For example we make a 70-200mm f/4 and a 70-200mm f/2.8. The 2.8 is much faster. Generally lenses with lower f numbers are capable of shooting at faster speeds. They are also more expensive.

 

You can't really say that x=good aperture and y=good speed. This is because they both can control the exposure which relies on the lighting conditions at the given time in the given place. They also combine in each other to achieve correct exposures. [example: f/4 at 1/200 = f/5.6 at 1/100. Both will achieve the correct exposure. The difference=depth of field. See below]

 

When shooting action you want to choose a fast shutter speed and adjust your aperture accordingly. You want to try to shoot as fast as possible - 1/250 and above. 1/250 isn't all that fast either.

 

As someone else pointed out, lower f numbers = blurred background (or foreground depending on where you focus). Lower f #'s = open lens while higher f #'s = closed. When you open the lens all the way up to say 1.4 you have a very shallow depth of field. I have an 85mm f/1.2. If I shot you at f/1.2 I could literally get only your eyelash in focus and soften the rest of your face. You may want more of the background in focus. If that's the case you will want to "stop up" in order to achieve more depth of field.

 

In order to get the correct exposure at higher f #'s you may need to increase the sensor's sensitivity to light. This is done by increasing the ISO. Be warned that the more you increase the ISO the grainier the picture will be. Since the D60 only goes up to ISO 1600 you shouldn't have too much of an issue. Most full frame (D60 is not a full frame) professional cameras go up to at least 3200 and more recent models achieve 6400. My camera goes up to 25, 600. That's total madness and creates some serious noise in the picture. But I can (and do) shoot in candlelight.

 

If you are shooting outdoors in sunlight you will probably not need to increase the ISO since it tends to be very bright. You may want to decrease the ISO if it is too bright or just to decrease the amount of noise in the picture.

 

I also have a 40D that is more comparable to the D60. My 40D can reach up to 3200 ISO. It is not a full frame camera and as a result has a 1.6x conversion on lens length. The D60 has a 1.5x conversion. This means that any lens you use will be more telephoto than it is designed to be. For example a wide angle lens such as a 16mm when mounted on your 60D (x 1.5) will shoot at 24mm. This has nothing to do with exposure. I just figured that I'd throw it in there for the sake of being thorough. wink.gif

 

Hope that helps.

 

Happy shooting. smile.gif

 

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If you don't have an exif viewer,there is free software.I use the one provided for Firefox.Most commercial pictures have the exif blocked but you can see the data in most pictures posted by members on this and other sites.The data from the owl was the only picture you posted that had the data available and it is-# Exposure Time (1 / Shutter Speed) = 1/1000 second = 0.001 second

# Lens F-Number/F-Stop = 5/1 = F5

# ISO Speed Ratings = 200

# Original Date/Time = 2009:01:04 14:34:39

# Flash = Flash did not fire

# Focal Length = 200/1 mm = 200 mm

# Image Width = 600 pixels

# Image Height = 400 pixels

 

You are getting a lot of good information here,don't try to cram with information and loose the art and fun of photography.When you photograph something,take a bunch of exposures then check the data and see what works.

Jake

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I don't shoot with a Nikon so I am not sure if they have the following capabilities.

1. Set the camera so you control the f-stop and let it adjust the aperture.

2. Set the camera so you control the aperture and it controls the f-stop.

3. Exposure bracket you shots.

 

Once you try this for a while and study the results go to full manual.

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View PostHopefuly some of the pros will chime in. I have been tryin go to learn My Nikon D60. I have been running into some issues getting the clearest photo possible. I am really interested in photographing action picutes. IE Ocean Waves, Sports, Casting, Fishing some light porn (just kidding) but you get the jist. What apeture settings and shutter speed would be recomeneded for these scenerios?

 

1)Overcast Day On the Surf

2)Bright Sunny Day on Surf Capturing Waves

3)Sunrise and Sunset

4)fish Jumping out of water.

 

I understand that a faster shutter speed would be optimal, it just seems that i cannot match the apeture settings with the shutter speed correct. I dont want to be that guy that has a $1000 worth of equipment and uses the auto setting.

 

I have the 18m - 55m VR and the 55 - 200VR lense. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Here are some sample images that I would like to match in quality:

 

courtest of "Mighty Quinn"

 

 

Courtesy of "allen sklar"

 

 

Courtesy of "BelAirSteve"

 

 

Courtesy of "allen sklar"

 

 

Courtesy of "riverrunner"

 

I am no pro but I shoot a lot and have tons pictures and lucky with digital cameras your allowed to make mistakes. One thing I tell everyone that is getting into photography is to work on your shooting percentages, so what that mean if you took 10 pictures how many of those were good, lets only 5 five them came out perfect than you shooting percentage is 50%. As you shoot more and understand how to shoot then your percentage will go up. mine is around 95%.

 

Let cover the basics:

Aperture:

the brighter day the higher Aperture setting and the opposite if the conditions are darker. But the distance of the object is more important with a beginner so focus on that...

 

The further the object is the higher the Aperture setting ( e.g. a landscape shot of a sunrise or sunset)

 

The closer the object is the lower aperture setting is need for example a portrait picture.

 

ISO speed

The less light the higher the speed its that simple...

outside pictures lower the lSO. I normal shoot a 80 or 100 for outside and 200 to 800 for inside depending on lighting.

 

shutter speeds:

Shutter speeds depend on ISO and Aperture settings in my opinion, but to make simple the less light you have the higher the shutter speed should be, which in turn will make the picture darker so thats where the Aperture and ISO settings come into play( So in turn to get the correct exposure the Aperture setting would decrease and the ISO might need to be increased( again as stated above it depends on a lot of factors)) . But they are time where you want a slow shutter speed.. For example when i shot the Trevi fountain I wanted a night shot with no flash and I want the water to appear as it was moving. So that when the tri-pod comes out and the shutter speed slows down. I also use this type of shooting with a waterfall or a wave crashing on the beach. The golden rule is simple the longer the shutter takes to close the more light enter into the lens, which may over expose you shot or blur a fast moving object. The faster the shutter speed the less light enter the lens, which may under expose your shot..

 

 

If was shooting with a C 5060 from Olympus I would start with these setting

 

1)Overcast Day On the Surf

F 4.0 1/100 ISO 100

 

2)Bright Sunny Day on Surf Capturing Waves

F 8.0 1/150 ISO 80

 

or to get the water in motion affect

 

F 80 1/50 ISO 80

 

3)Sunrise and Sunset

 

F 8.0 1/150 ISO 80

 

4)fish Jumping out of water.

 

If the fish is close and out side

 

F 2.8 1/250 ISO 80

 

If the fish is far way and out side

 

F 8 1/250 ISO 80

 

If the fish is close and inside

 

F 3.8 1/200 ISO 400

 

If the fish is far way and inside

 

F 4 1/150 ISO 200

 

 

thanks

Xmytruck

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