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OCsurfcaster

Newbies finding certian spots?

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How do we do it..just time, expierence..im new..fresh meat..one season of striper fishing under my belt..but how do i come to find great surf fishing spots..how did you vets find your spots? dont give em away..just let us newbies know how we do it.

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OC, I have learned by fishing with expierenced anglers. But mostly by learning to read the water. I look for cuts,sandbars, structure and currents and most importantly by putting time in fishing at sun up, sun down, night or getting to the water when the wind is right.

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cwm15.gif

Research! There are some excellent books on surf fishing, all the info is there.

After the books, scout a few areas now that you'll know what to look for. Such as structure, currents, bait, etc.

Start a log on all of your ventures, what you see, note the date, time, weather, tides, any bait observed, etc..

It's a never ending quest, enjoy it!

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http://www.stripersonline.com/Pages/Articles/

 

 

and

 

 

View PostAin't no way that's Jersey, here's why:

 

  • No body collecting money to walk on the sand

     

  • No traffic jams visible on any of the roads

     

  • There's not 42 fishermen trying to fish this 500yd stretch of beach

     

  • The water gets too deep too quickly

     

  • There's no lifeguard stands every 85 feet to protect the towns from lawsuits from people who can't swim going into a storm surf

Prospector, if NJ had water like that, I wouldn't have to drive all the way up to yer neighborhood wink.gif

 

 

Rips are generally where current flows over a sudden change in depth/contour. There can be rips from the wind piling the water into a jetty pocket, the water would "rip" out where it could. Rips can be where two different currents run next to each other.

 

 

The picture shows a steep beach with cuts breaching a wide, shallow bar as well as sweeping across some sandy points, both big and small. Once the water removes more sand from behind the bar, then holes will form...they'll hold fish.

 

 

Anyway, I figger since that picture show some water that makes me break out in cold sweats, I'll scribble on it some and try to unravel some mysteries for you guys looking to understand such a place.

 

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=1333&d=11435

 

 

The arrows show the water's direction. The shallow/deep changes are obvious from this point of view. If you were at ground level or in the dark, you could tell the general depth by the white water. The whiter a wave breaks the shallower the water. If the wave doesn't break but crests, it's pretty deep. If the wave barely bulges, it's very deep. If the wave breaks or crests but then reforms, it was shallow but got deeper...this is a good spot smile.gif

 

 

One must consider that all fish want to expend as little energy as possible while waiting for grub. They will station themselves where the deep water butts up to the shallow stuff, the steeper the slope, the more protection from the forces of the current the fish will enjoy..they will look for these spots! The easiest way for stripers to feed is to sit with their noses against one of these drop offs where the water comes directly towards them and over their heads...they'll be watching the water for anything resembling a disoriented critter. Wherever you see the smaller arrows that show the water spilling off the points is just that kinda water. In the dark many times you will find the fish feeding right where the waves are crashing...where the big arrows point towards shore. You can see the outter bar in this photo that causes the wave to break. The fish will sit on the shore side of this bar and look for disoriented critters. The best way to fish those spots would be at an angle. That is, you'd stand on the point if safe and cast just behind the breaking wave at an angle of about 45 degrees. Generally, the water won't be coming straight it, it's best to cast at an angle at which the water will pull against your lure rather than push it towards you. About the least realistic way to fish this kinda water is also the most popular. Folks will line up with the arrows headed out, the deepest water...they'll cast straight out and bring their lures in directly against the current. That's wrong...yes, occasionally a suicidal little rat will latch on, but you'r missing out on the real gems in this water.

 

 

If the waters too rough or deep to get on the points, the letter "C"'s mark a likely feeding spot near shore. The water that rushes up on the sand pulls back out where marked by the C's. Again, you don't want to stand at C and cast straight out. Ideally, you'd stand at B and cast right up nearly onto the sand when the wave is as far up the beach as it will go...then your lure will look most realistic as it enters the strike zone. If you can't get to B, get down the beach from C and cast across it...this will work but isn't ideal. I put the D's on there for you folks who prefer to throw clams....you put a clam on those D's and everything is working for ya! The water flow will send your clam smell all over the hole...and any fish cruising in/out of the hole will usually do so along those edges. Funny thing, the fish will often favor one D over the other...it doesn't even always make sense, but they sometimes will.

 

 

Hope this helps smile.gif

 

 

TimS

 

View PostPlug...good point...one thing you're forgetting...we don't have enough current here to cause any kind of rips to form anywhere except in the inlets! All rips along jetties and beaches are formed by the current wave action and wind...they are "by the book"....nothing fancy. If the waves are 2-3 feet and coming from the SE...look for the water on the north side of the jetty to pull out next to the rocks....sweep from left to right along the beach from the point the waves are hitting the beach to the rip along the jetty...and from right to left from where the waves are hitting the beach to the rip on the southside of the jetty to the north.

 

 

No "up my sleeve" tricks, no "magic spots at certain tides"....plain old wind and wave induced rips and currents...everything that's out there is obvious....Dan O'Connor once coined a piece of Spring Lake Beach as "Obvious Beach"....he said any hammerhead could see the holes and bars...even at night! Yes, it takes wind/waves to make the white stuff that helps us read beaches....hopefully, we'll have 2-3 footers...light winds and many unicorns!

 

 

The section of beach that we're going to fish has a groin or jetty approximately every 150-200yds..some closer, some further....the jetties kinda act like "bumpers" for the waves...the waves are forced to react to the jetties in a predictable manner...easy to see, even at night. If there aren't enough waves to have the white stuff, I'll be walkin' and casting just like you! The entire stretch is 7 miles....most people will be in northern most 3 miles or so.

 

 

As for starting out places....I'll be honest, each spring, it starts all over...I have been fishing this stretch for 15 years and still have to find the fish myself everytime I go out...and when you find them in one spot, they are usually spread out through the entire stretch...that's what makes this spot a good one...almost the entire stretch is very consistently excellent fishing...where to start is usually only a matter to me of where there is no one else...that's it.

 

 

Technically, it's easier than driving the sand...you drive the asphalt...park...walk 30 feet to the boardwalk...it's elevated and lighted...you can see the water clearly from there and you can see holes, cuts, bars, white water...you can make a call based on a 30 foot walk on concrete on boardwalk!! It doesn't get any easier than that! smile.gif

 

 

TimS

 

 

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Thank you but I'm just real good with the search feature

 

Use it and find all the info you could possibly want.

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I got a book that pointed me in the right directions when i first started out. Then its using your head. You look around and find a spot that looks good, then you find a way to get there. Every time out you learn more about fishing, you use the knowledge to point you to a certain spot at a certain time. Keeping a log is damn helpful, wish i would have started when i first wet a line. Find a good tackle shop, and make it your tackle shop, get to know the guys and spend a few bucks, ask a few questions and pay attention to what other fisherman say and do. You will find your niche and succeed. The most important thing you can do is go fishing. Go in a variety of conditions, use a variety of techniques, fish different tide and moon phases and see what works for you.

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Where you fishing? Open beach much harder to cut your teeth on, or better put the changes are harder to notice when your are less experienced. Fishing the back side of island beaches,etc bays these cuts, change in current i.e. structure are a more easily disernable.The vastness of an open stretch of a sandy beach sometimes it is harder to focus and as such harder to try and break down; cwm31.gif

Use google earth or some sort of internet satelite imagery, buy a nautical map and explore points that appear interesting from google earth. Drop some coin in a local tackle store and ask about local spots,it is a start.

If there is a local clammer, bayman try dropping off a case of suds, a couple of cigars ????depending on who he is that info can be invaluable. Oh yes walk the beach, little harder to do on the back side hence my suggestion from above.

 

When you do find an interesting area whether its open beach or backside

pick a spot and focus on it trying to get a fish from it, visit it on different tides, fish it during different moon phases, different winds. Beacuse you need

to conquer that first 50 foot radius of beach before you can conquer the rest of the beach. themes and patterns repeat themselves, so that is what you really are trying to learn. yes there are specifics to area but that is what becomes your local knowledge a large% of what you need to catch fish is applicable to every spot. as always just my .02

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That would be your feet. Plugging lets you cover miles, if necessary. Walk, cast, repeat. If you get a hit or fish, hang for a few more casts. Sometimes getting a fish is the tip of the iceberg, other times you caught the only stray around. When you find a producing spot note it in a manner that will let you find it again. Keep records, Date, Tide, surf, wind speed and direction, light level, lure, location, moon phase and catch.

 

Peace

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View PostThat would be your feet. Plugging lets you cover miles, if necessary. Walk, cast, repeat. If you get a hit or fish, hang for a few more casts. Sometimes getting a fish is the tip of the iceberg, other times you caught the only stray around. When you find a producing spot note it in a manner that will let you find it again. Keep records, Date, Tide, surf, wind speed and direction, light level, lure, location, moon phase and catch.

 

Peace

 

It is good recommendations, but keep in the mind that a lot of things on the sand beach is changing. You have to read water again and again.

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