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Hanta Virus, What precautions do you take?

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I tore out the old finished 60's style basement this week, I'm still cleaning up. The ceilings came down last night and besides soot from various puffbacks from over the years, alot of mouse poop, 3 Dead Mice, and dust came out too. I had a dust mask on, do you think that was enough. Today I'm wetting everything down with a bleach mixture and will mop up. And I bought a respirator. Any other advice?

Thanks, Pete

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I am not sure of exact precautions, but I would start of by keeping kids or old folks away. Anyone with a less than stellar immune system is bound to pick up some mold spore or other crap during remodeling and is more likely to get sick from it.

 

Am I missing a joke her or are you really concerned about Hanta virus?

 

I would imagine that if mice were in the house they weren't confined to behind walls and ceilings and they would have tracked whatever diseases they had throghout the house. You are right though there living space would probably be nastier.

 

I wear a respirator for work all the time, and in my opinion dust masks are worse than nothing at all. If the mask does not fit your face properly it can trap dirty air between the mask and your face. In my opinion tight fitting face masks are the only way to go and should have at least a HEPA or N95 cartridge.

 

CJ

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With 45,000 square ft. of hung ceilings, We deal with it everyday. Use a n-99 mask, gloves, goggles and a hat. Very important is to wash your hands and face afterwards with a good anti-Bac. soap as soon as yer done. Knew someone who got it cleaning out is Mothers basement. He almost bit the big before they figured it out. Got it during a lunchbreak and didn't wash his hands, and Yes, he was wearing gloves. cwm31.gif Scarey stuff.

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Don't take any chances. Treat this like it was cyanide. Mice are a disgusting little creature. Do whatever is necessary to limit or eliminate your contact with mouse feces and urine. Clean yourself when leaving the work area. Be cognizant at all times of what you come in contact with. Setup a cleaning station before any work to decontaminate yourself after work is completed. You don't want to track any even the smallest debris in your home. Remove clothing before entering your living area. Respirator for biological microscopic particles is necessary. Keep others away from the area who are not protected. Don't mess around with mice or rodents that have established a living space.

 

Visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hanta/hps/ for further info.

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I'm convinced I had it back in the mid 90's. At the time there had never been any confirmed cases outside the southwest so the hospital blew me off when I called, told me it was just a bad case of the flu. Lord was I sick, and I mean for days, and I was relativly young and healthy back then. If I got that sick now I would die, not a question in my mind.

 

I was renovating an old chicken coop at the time and wearing a simple dust mask off and on. After what I went through I'd reccomend the correct type of resperator for sure.

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Squidlips,

I'm glad you made it through especially without hospital care. Most folks don't. Because its a virus it's just your antibodies vs the virus. Scary stuff.

I bought a canister type respirator, and its alot more comfortable than the dust masks. I just hope I wasn't too late. There was alot of dust flying around.

 

Shagwink.gif

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View PostI'm convinced I had it back in the mid 90's. At the time there had never been any confirmed cases outside the southwest so the hospital blew me off when I called, told me it was just a bad case of the flu. Lord was I sick, and I mean for days, and I was relativly young and healthy back then. If I got that sick now I would die, not a question in my mind.

 

I was renovating an old chicken coop at the time and wearing a simple dust mask off and on. After what I went through I'd reccomend the correct type of resperator for sure.

 

 

i wonder if it was psiatosis

 

how common is hanta virus in the northeast?

 

i work in an old greenhouse, and micew are a problem- we have an exterminator come in monthly, but the mice are fairly persistent

 

the rats seem to be gone though

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It was probably the flu. redface.gif

 

But man, there was mouse poop and bird poop dropping out of the ceiling, the walls, clouds of dust, nests..... blech.

 

cwm27.gif

 

Nice to be able to look back at that episode and laugh. beers.gif

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I know it is out there and dangerous. I live in MA. I asked the mass wildlife people about it and they looked at me like I was from mars. Yes it is possible, but they haven't seen it too much up here in the northeast. I think it is more prevalent out west like in Arizona. I still leave baited (peanut butter) mouse traps in my garage on an ongoing basis. It is new and pretty well sealed but it is big with 3 bays and is open a lot. I think they sneak in that way. I manage to trap about a dozen every year. I'm hoping to start affecting the population.... Never had one in the house (knock on wood) . When I find evidence, I spray it with bleach and water, and clean up that way to be safe. They say to wet it so you don't have lots of airborne dust.

 

One trick I figured out with the cheap snap type traps. Bait it with peanut butter and then put a toothpick crosswise through that little hole in the snap mechanism. I had a bunch of small ones around and they were able to eat around the mechanism and not set it off. Having the toothpick in there gave them something bigger to set off. Worked like a charm. Next nite 3 or 4 traps were full.

 

They get into everything. My father in law has had to totally take apart his clutch in his f250 truck twice because mice built this huge horrible mess in there. It is so bad he can't drive it, clutch totally won't work. I also have found stuff shredded up in the trunk of my car. I am thinking of putting traps in there to catch some of the ones "outside".

 

 

They also seem to love the flywheels of small engines.

 

I am sure we could have a thread a mile long of what they have gotten into...

 

Good luck

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In 1987 we bought a taurus wagon, then added another son. Anyway its our first fuel injected car. Over the winter, rats came out of the marsh and began to chew the injection wires. I ended up building a wire cage over everything on top of the motor to keep them out. That was after a $1000.00 bill from the dealership. The warranty ddn't cover rat chewing.

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This was cut and pasted from some newspaper site. I hope its allowed.

 

RODENTS HAD VIRUS THAT KILLED

 

BY MICHAEL S.C. CLAFFEY

 

Thursday, June 8th 1995, 1:16AM

 

Half the rodents trapped near the home of an East End landscaper who died of the deadly hantavirus were carrying antibodies for the disease, Suffolk health officials said yesterday.

 

But Suffolk Public Health Director Mahfouz Zaki said there is no cause for alarm. The presence of the antibodies is common in rodents and doesn't automatically mean that they can transmit the disease, he said.

 

The hantavirus is spread through airborne particles from rodent feces or urine. Health officials have urged extreme caution in handling rodents or their droppings.

 

The test results came from 20 mice, three voles and one shrew that were trapped near the Bridgehampton home of the landscaper who died last month.

 

Of the 104 people known to have contracted the virus nationwide, more than half have died, Zaki said.

 

But the disease has generally been confined to the Southwest. Only two cases, both fatalities, have occurred in the Northeast, and both were linked to Long Island.

 

David Rosenberg, 22, of Roslyn Harbor, died of hantavirus at his Rhode Island college in early 1994, shortly after he had spent time at his parents' Shelter Island summer home.

 

The disease triggered by the hantavirus starts with flu-like symptoms that lead to respiratory failure.

 

Health officials said rodent droppings should be sprayed with water or a mixture of water, bleach and dish detergent. The droppings should then be mopped up, instead of swept up or vacuumed, to avoid spreading the virus into the air.

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Our clean-up procedures call wetting it down with Chlorine/water and cleaning it up wet. Avoid vacuuming or anything that makes it air borne. Use respirator at all times with proper cartrig attached.

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