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MrTeek

Dremel, drilling, and steel

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Hey guys. I'm in the process of pimping out a penn 700, and I'm hoping to drill it out like you guys typically do with a dremel.smile.gif

 

Any of you guys have experience with drilling the steel rotor cup with a dremel? I've never done this before, just looking for some tips and general advice.

 

My biggest problem is dremel doesn't really suggest or make drill bits specifically for drilling steel. They're very vague about it. Any suggestions on bits to use or methods?

 

Thanks.

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I have a ton of experience working with dremels, to drill holes in wood its fine or free hand carving , grinding, general shaping etc. Metal is alot harder to work with because u can't get a slow enought speed on a dremel to drill it correctly. when u drill metal u want a relativly low speed but with enought torgue to bore and chip away the material. a dremel spins too fast and vibrates. as soon as u break the surface the bit can shift position and mess up ur hole, so if u want to be neat, definatly like others have stated use a drill press and a drill vise where u can hold the workpiece.

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MrTeek, my only advice to you is don't drill the bottom of the 700 rotor-cup only the sides. Unlike other Penn rotors drilling the bottom of the 700 you are just draining onto your pinion bearing. (NOT SMART)cwm40.gif

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Wow, I didn't know that using the dremel was such a bad idea. Thanks for the heads up, I'm glad I asked you guys first before I started and could have messed things up badly.

 

So I guess I'll have to take this to a machinist to get it done?headscratch.gif

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Ok, I misread some of the posts.

 

So now that I'm coherent, what I can get is that YOU CAN use the dremel if you want to, but you may not get the best results as if using a professional drill press.

 

I forgot to mention, that I have the drill press attachment for the dremel. So with that in mind is it a bit more viable?

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It's more the fact that the Dremel can't turn slow enough to drill metal properly. How big are the holes you plan on putting in there? Lets say you were going to use a 1/4 inch drill, you would not want to spin in much faster than 500 Rpm's. You want to use some sort of cutting oil on it as well, motor oil works fine in a pinch, the drill will last longer. And make sure to lay out the holes before you start, with a punch of some sort, this will give the drill some thing to locate itself on.

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You can do much better job with a hand drill and good bits than a Dremel ever could. Also, you are not likely to mess up with the drill.

Mark out the pattern, make dimples on your layout marks with a center punch, drill out with a 1/8 bit first, and then work up in bit size through all the holes.

It will come out very nicely, IF you take the time to be neat, clean and precise.

Take the time to be positive that the layout marks are evenly spaced, and placed so no hole is too close to the roller or opposite.

Uneven layout makes for a very shoddy looking product.

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do you have access to a drill press ?

that will make your job much easyer

lay out your drilling patten

save the dremmel tool for deburring both sides of the holes

spray a lil bit of WD-40 as your drilling after deburring the holes degrease it

since the polishing compounds also have grease/wax in them

beers.gif have fun

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I would ude a drill press or you can use a hand drill (that's what I used and it came out fine) If you still want to give a dremel a try contact Mike (srfslick) via PM on this site. I think he used a dremel he will tell you any problems that he had. Just take your time and it will come out okay. You should only drill out the sides of the 700 and not the bottom though as lion said a few posts up.

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Thanks so far for everyone's opinion and advice. I think I'm going to forget the dremel for now and maybe use a hand drill and a vice. FYI, I might have access to a drill press, waiting on a friend to get back to me on that.

 

So if my friend bails, my plan is to anchor the rotor cup in the vice, use a centerpunch to mark the holes and use a hand drill. Now my next question, is if my drill is up to the task. I hate to say its a "crappy" craftsman drill but it certainly isn't top notch. Its a 7.2 volt hand drill, probably like $30 at sears. It's also battery powered.

 

What do you think, can the drill handle the job?

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Yes, and I'll say it again, buy a brand new bit.

 

If you look around a bit, you should be able to find an old junker or two...brand and model don't matter, because they're gonna be sacrificed. Pull the rotors, and drill them. Make your mistakes on a POS.wink.gif

 

One more thing: be very careful with that vise. Treat your rotor with care.

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