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flysnplugs

Plain Blade? Serrated Blade?

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I am ordering a G.Sakai Sabi in H1 steel for my surf belt. Should I order a plain edge or a serrated edge? What are the pros and cons? I look forward to everyone's thoughts and ideas.

Thanks in advance. FnP

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For any knife used in an environment where you can tangle in mono through lobster pot ropes I would and do cary a combo blade. The serations will get you out of a lot of rope or line fast.

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Think of it this way... Serated will cut through just about anything, a razor edge will dull a lot faster and cut through less. But it seems that the combo blade has the ups on this one, and honestly I'd prolly get it too wink.gif

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Another thing to consider is, how will you sharpen a serrated knife?

 

If you use it long enough it will get dull. If it was cheap enough then just replace it. Or send it back for sharpening. Or buy the right tools to sharpen it.

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View PostAnother thing to consider is, how will you sharpen a serrated knife?

 

If you use it long enough it will get dull. If it was cheap enough then just replace it. Or send it back for sharpening. Or buy the right tools to sharpen it.

 

I have been using a Spyderco Sharpmaker to sharpen the serrated blades I use. Works well.

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Serrated 100% since they will have a small part at the tip that will be plain edge.

 

To sharpen you just need a rod type diamond steel and run it along the angle of the serration. Then you will feel a BURR on the backside of the blade (no scalloped serrations) that you can either sharpen on an upstroke and break it off in essence creating a double sided serration or on the downstoke to straigten it out (more brittle but sharper)

 

I suggest www.BLADEFORUMS.com if your getting into knives. They will teach you everything.

 

Of course for the everyday pocket folder a SEBENZA is the only way to go. Had mine 8 years not made any purchases since.

 

JC

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quote=flysnplugs;5766686]I am ordering a G.Sakai Sabi in H1 steel for my surf belt. Should I order a plain edge or a serrated edge? What are the pros and cons? I look forward to everyone's thoughts and ideas.

Thanks in advance. FnP

 

 

What influenced you to pick this brand??? headscratch.gif

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EdL

What influenced you to pick this brand??? headscratch.gif

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I have a folder, Spyderco Tasman Salt it uses the H1 steel. It will not rust. Used it in the salt and intentionally did not rinse it. No rust after weeks n months. Spyderco now make a few fixed blade knives but they are about 2x the price. Spyderco has imported G.Sakai knives into the USA, I am not sure but I think that the H1 steel may have been developed by G.Sakai or some other Japanese steel producer. It is harder to sharpen but does come back to a very keen edge.

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Jameson - QUOTE "To sharpen you just need a rod type diamond steel and run it along the angle of the serration. Then you will feel a BURR on the backside of the blade (no scalloped serrations) that you can either sharpen on an upstroke and break it off in essence creating a double sided serration or on the downstoke to straigten it out (more brittle but sharper)

 

I suggest www.BLADEFORUMS.com if your getting into knives. They will teach you everything.

 

Of course for the everyday pocket folder a SEBENZA is the only way to go. Had mine 8 years not made any purchases since.

 

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I am registered @ BladeForums. I have read many good reviews about the Sebie, everyone that carries one really likes it. I've got a few kniveswink.gif , Gossman, Busse, Terzuola. I buy them to use no safe queens. I have slowed down now. The Sharpmaker is what you have described I am planning to get the diamond rods when I can find tham a t the right price.

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I usually have a combination when possible. Anytime you're cutting anything that resembles rope (string, line, twine, rope) it's quicker to cut thru using a serrated blade. Not the serrated that you used to find on steak knives in the 50s, I'm talking about the modern scalloped type serrations.

As far a sharpening either straigh or serrated, I've had a Chantry knife sharpener for over 20 years. That will sharpen either normal or serrated without any problem. They're a bit more expensive these days. But like I said I've had mine for over 20 years without any problems. They sell replacement rods for them. Mine are still the original and still working fine. 6 pulles thru the thing will keep a sharp knife sharp, usually you don't even need that many. It does work best if you've got at least a basic edge on the knife when you start, otherwise it takes a bit to get to sharp. But once you've got the proper edge, all the knives need are a touch up once in a while, depending on the hardness and use of the blade.

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Serrated is a good edge for an emergency tool, that might have to saw through heavy line, or a seatbelt or something like that in a hurry. But, serrated edges are harder to sharpen, and they don't make as clean a cut as a plain edge. You won't see good fillet knives,or good chefs/kitchen knives with serrated edges. Although makers of tactical knives are now producing many of their models with serrated, or combo edges, I still believe a plain. non serrated blade will give the best all around performance.

 

Valentine

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View PostEdL

What influenced you to pick this brand??? headscratch.gif

 

-----------------------------------------

 

I have a folder, Spyderco Tasman Salt it uses the H1 steel. It will not rust. Used it in the salt and intentionally did not rinse it. No rust after weeks n months. Spyderco now make a few fixed blade knives but they are about 2x the price. Spyderco has imported G.Sakai knives into the USA, I am not sure but I think that the H1 steel may have been developed by G.Sakai or some other Japanese steel producer. It is harder to sharpen but does come back to a very keen edge.

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I also have a Spyderco folder in the H1 steel, and it has shown no rust after repeated dunkings on the surf belt without being rinsed at the end of the day. Very sharp out of the box. I have a serrated model, but it has a small section at the blade tip that is plain, so it has the best of both worlds...

 

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