Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GoBow

New AC outlet question - Left or Right

Rate this topic

15 posts in this topic

Trying to finish off the attached garage into a rec room. I'd like to put a window AC unit in at some point down the road. I'm getting ready to run a 220 circuit over to the window for power. Don't have the AC yet, so without knowing which side the cord is on, is there a standard location for the outlet at the window?

 

Facing the window from inside the room - Left or right?

 

Gonna use 10/2, total run <50 ft.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you concidered putting it in da wall vs putting it in da window, that is if your doing the work on the room why not go one step further.

I hate to sound vage but I don't think theres a NEC standard for OEM standard protocall on which side the electrical cord terminates from the unit.

 

 

Also most receptical out lets are 18" on center off the floor and 6' from receptical to receptical or 2' from end of a wall,meaning from a door way or jog in the wall,if you are doing the work I would bring the receptical right up to the unit,I don't think it matters where you locate the receptical as long as it meets NEC or local codes.go to nec.com find out what the national standard is then call you local electric municipal dept./ town inspector and ask him what code is.

 

Also do you really need a 208 Volt double pole breaker for this unit,10/2 is great for less resistance and is good for a 30AMP double pole breaker?

I think most residential window units are 115 volts Im sure there are 208 systems out there,but 208 might be what this AC unit isn't designed for, just asking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies.

 

Speed, the outlet is going next to the window. Just wondering if L or R.

 

5/0, I'm not gonna cut the wall; the unit is going in the window. The A/C will be +/- 25,000 btu, they're 220v. 10/2 might be overkill, but that's just me.

 

If nothing else, I'll just head to Lowes and Sears this week and take a market survey to see which side the cords exit the A/C units on.

 

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 25,000 BTUH window A/C unit is going to need close to a 30-amp circuit on 240V, 1-phase. You decision to use 10/2 wire is a good one. Some A/C units may require a third wire (10/3) and matching 3-wire w/ground outlet, so pay attention to this when purchasing the A/C unit later.

 

Most window A/C units will allow you to run the cord behind the front cover from one side to the other to allow for outlets installed on the opposite side of the cord connection (not all, though). I don't think it will matter much (L/R), as long as you keep the outlet relatively close to the window opening.

 

Have you considered a split A/C unit instead? They are way more efficient than a window A/C unit, especially at 25,000 BTUH. Take a look at an inverter unit and you'll see what I mean (Mitsubishi, Fujitsu, Sanyo, etc..). Rough-in a 2-pole, 240V, 30A circuit on the outside for your ACCU and a 1-pole, 120V, 15A circuit for your FCU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostA 25,000 BTUH window A/C unit is going to need close to a 30-amp circuit on 240V, 1-phase. You decision to use 10/2 wire is a good one. Some A/C units may require a third wire (10/3) and matching 3-wire w/ground outlet, so pay attention to this when purchasing the A/C unit later.

 

Most window A/C units will allow you to run the cord behind the front cover from one side to the other to allow for outlets installed on the opposite side of the cord connection (not all, though). I don't think it will matter much (L/R), as long as you keep the outlet relatively close to the window opening.

 

Have you considered a split A/C unit instead? They are way more efficient than a window A/C unit, especially at 25,000 BTUH. Take a look at an inverter unit and you'll see what I mean (Mitsubishi, Fujitsu, Sanyo, etc..). Rough-in a 2-pole, 240V, 30A circuit on the outside for your ACCU and a 1-pole, 120V, 15A circuit for your FCU.

 

 

what he said, the mini-splits have come down in price since there are so many companies making them. MUCH more efficient and so much quieter than a window shaker, especially in the size you are looking at.

 

also available in heat pumps to heat the area in the winter.wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GoBow I understand & I don't think your overkilling it,if it's 208 volts then it's that way for efficiancy, more voltage = less resistance and less amps.

 

 

Split unit is the way togo,more efficient nicer asteticly but way more money than a window shaker plus the added price of install.

A nice Puron 410A 2.5 ton system would be nice system for the room he's working in.

 

It's easy to spend some one eles money & in this economy things are tight for most of us,but above all it's a buyers marketwink.gif

 

 

5/0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostGoBow I understand & I don't think your overkilling it,if it's 208 volts then it's that way for efficiancy, more voltage = less resistance and less amps.

 

5/0

 

 

higher voltage does not increase efficiency or reduce operating cost.......headscratch.gif

 

 

only thing higher voltage does is decrease required wire size.wink.gif

 

 

for the size unit he is looking at i don't think 115v is an option anyway, pretty sure the largest 115v shaker is around 18,000 btu.

 

 

how big is the garage and how is it insulated? 28,000 btu's will cool an average sized house in our area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View Posthigher voltage does not increase efficiency or reduce operating cost.......headscratch.gif

 

 

only thing higher voltage does is decrease required wire size.wink.gif

.

 

 

So I can re-wire my house with 18/2 LOL!

 

What size are you talking about AWG Kmil? or are you talking about just the numerical number?I don't follow you.

 

You have never heard that larger wire has less resistance?Why do you think they run 2/0 for a 200 amp service vs 10 guage,it's for less restriction,resistance will heat up which = fire.

 

Never heard of this?Google it or check out National electric code.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you have a 115v load at 20 amps it will be a 230v load at 10 amps.

 

thus the smaller wire size needed.wink.gif

 

 

and if the voltage was high enough in your house 18-2 would handle the load...

 

as far as being cheaper to run a higher voltage motor it's not, they measure watts for electrical usage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wire SizeRecently, there has been numerous questions on this board concerning the proper type or size of AC power cable to use with different amounts of equipment. It is very important to use the correct size cable to insure all the power will be available to your equipment and there is no danger of a fire or short from your cables. Here is a Cable/Current table to help you select the proper one to use in your application. Wire Size (AWG) 2 Conductor3 Conductor4 Conductor1030Amp252012252016141815121613108181076 Notice that the smaller the AWG number, the more current it can handle. All Extension Cords are required to list the wire gauge. That will tell you the amount of current they can safely handle. The wire in the above example is Copper type and of the same temperature rating. All currents listed are for Ambient temperature. Keep in mind that there are also many different type of insulation material that will determine the temperature rating. The wire may not be pure copper but an alloyed of aluminum, nickel, tin and copper. Standard cable, as used in home and general construction, is classified by the wire size, number of wires, insulation type and dampness condition of the wire environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most home A/C units I have seen in the last 10 or so years have the cabling exit the left bottom of the unit.

Spacing for receptacles is no more than 12' between so a lamp or other device would be no more than 6' from a receptacle. This is to keep us from running extension cords. Frankly, I like LOTS of receptacles, so long as they have the load capacity to handle a bunch of stuff.

I break my rooms up every other receptacle, and the overhead light does not share any wall receptacle in that room.

Oh, an A/C should have it's own home runsmile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The newest I've purchased exit on the rightside. But go online and pick your unit based on BTU, EER and Cost. Then Rough it in accordingly. I don't think theres a code, so thats how I would go about it.

Robsmile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and thoughts. It's a two car garage, 28'x24'x10', insulated and drywalled.

 

CD, you're spot on about the home run, might be 40 feet to the panel, figured to run a dedicated circuit just for the AC.

 

Fish, Didn't know that the AC cord could be routed L or R within the unit, I'll have to check that out.

 

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.