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fisherman25

Dying bucktail, kool-aid results

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Saw a post about Kool-Aid and tried it out on some small pieces of bucktail, and some already tied jigs.

 

 

Pict 1 Black Cherry

Pict 2 Blue Raspberry (the darker one with a little blue food cloring)

Pict 3 Grape

525

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These are the directions I followed to dye them.

 

Dying Buck Tail With Kool-Aide

by Kevin McKay

 

Items Needed

1. Unsweetened Kool-Aid

2. White Vinegar

3. 2 Pots

4. Measuring Cup

5. Water

 

 

1. Take the tail and place it in a pot with hot water right out of the tap for 30 minutes until the tail is soft.

 

2. Place two packages of Kool-Aid in a second pot with 12 ounces of water and 4 ounces of vinegar. Bring it to just below boiling.

 

3. Remove the tail from the hot water and get rid of the excess water and pieces of tail that have come off, over a sink.

 

4. Place tail in the Kool-Aid.

 

5. Make sure the whole tail is covered.

 

6. Let the tail simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or until the tail has reached the desired color. (I let mine stay in for about 2 hrs).

 

7. Let the solution temperature cool down.

 

8. Rinse and wash in warm water with dish soap.

 

9. Now take a coat hanger and clothes line pins and hang the tail to dry.

 

 

I like the results of the purple and black cherry. About a week after they dried I put them back into a pot with warm water, leaving them in the water for an hour, the color's ran but very little. The dye hasn't come off when I've been handling them.

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I was on a 6pack charter out east for stripers and we were given "wine" colored bucktail jigs and we slayed them. I was tieing professionaly at the time and wanted to copy the hair color and could not buy it any where. My girl friend and were in school and this girl walked by with purple hair!

 

off to the hair color asle no luck and no purple. the sales girl askes me if i need help. when i got done explaining what i needed to dye and what color she sugested cool aid. was she bsing me nope it worked great and the color held fast.

 

this was (now this post) my trick. with fabric dyes the colors you can make are endless. the fabric dyes are more costly and cool aid works great and is cheap.

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Kool.

 

I've been hearing about this kool-aid color process for a while. Nice to see first hand results. Good job.

 

Now who's up for some Lemon-Lime, some Arctic Green Apple, or some Pina Pineapple?

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View PostThese are the directions I followed to dye them.

 

Dying Buck Tail With Kool-Aide

by Kevin McKay

 

Items Needed

1. Unsweetened Kool-Aid

2. White Vinegar

3. 2 Pots

4. Measuring Cup

5. Water

 

 

1. Take the tail and place it in a pot with hot water right out of the tap for 30 minutes until the tail is soft.

 

2. Place two packages of Kool-Aid in a second pot with 12 ounces of water and 4 ounces of vinegar. Bring it to just below boiling.

 

3. Remove the tail from the hot water and get rid of the excess water and pieces of tail that have come off, over a sink.

 

4. Place tail in the Kool-Aid.

 

5. Make sure the whole tail is covered.

 

6. Let the tail simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or until the tail has reached the desired color. (I let mine stay in for about 2 hrs).

 

7. Let the solution temperature cool down.

 

8. Rinse and wash in warm water with dish soap.

 

9. Now take a coat hanger and clothes line pins and hang the tail to dry.

 

 

I like the results of the purple and black cherry. About a week after they dried I put them back into a pot with warm water, leaving them in the water for an hour, the color's ran but very little. The dye hasn't come off when I've been handling them.

 

I skip step 1.

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I've been dying saddle this way for a while now. I've had absolutely no problem with the colors running. I've found that by adjusting the amount of time the saddle spends in the boiling dye solution I can control the shade of the color (i.e. pastel or rich).

 

Here's a fly I've tied that incorporates saddle died with Cool-Aid. These saddles only spent a few minutes in the solution to produce the pale colors I like for this particular pattern.

 

P1010162.jpg

 

PS: Lemon Lime + Lemonade = Chartreuse biggrin.gif

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